Simplicity

Your constantly-updated definition of Simplicity and collection of topical content and literature

111 shares
68
34
9

What is Simplicity?

Simplicity is a design philosophy championed by many successful companies like Apple and Google. When you design with the user's key goals in mind, you are designing for simplicity. Incorporating simplicity in your designs will help you design better user interfaces by helping your users achieve their goals faster and more efficiently, all while enjoying a great user experience.

Literature on Simplicity

Here’s the entire UX literature on Simplicity by the Interaction Design Foundation, collated in one place:

Learn more about Simplicity

Take a deep dive into Simplicity with our course UI Design Patterns for Successful Software.

Have you ever found yourself spotting shapes in the clouds? That is because people are hard-wired to recognize patterns, even when there are none. It’s the same reason that we often think we know where to click when first experiencing a website—and get frustrated if things aren’t where we think they should be. Choosing the right user interface design pattern is crucial to taking advantage of this natural pattern-spotting, and this course will teach you how to do just that.

User interface design patterns are the means by which structure and order can gel together to make powerful user experiences. Structure and order are also a user’s best friends, and along with the fact that old habits die hard (especially on the web), it is essential that designers consider user interfaces very carefully before they set the final design in stone. Products should consist of such good interactions that users don’t even notice how they got from point A to point B. Failing to do so can lead to user interfaces that are difficult or confusing to navigate, requiring the user to spend an unreasonable amount of time decoding the display—and just a few seconds too many can be “unreasonable”—rather than fulfilling their original aims and objectives.

While the focus is on the practical application of user interface design patterns, by the end of the course you will also be familiar with current terminology used in the design of user interfaces, and many of the key concepts under discussion. This should help put you ahead of the pack and furnish you with the knowledge necessary to advance beyond your competitors.

So, if you are struggling to decide which user interface design pattern is best, and how you can achieve maximum usability through implementing it, then step no further. This course will equip you with the knowledge necessary to select the most appropriate display methods and solve common design problems affecting existing user interfaces.

All literature

Hick’s Law: Making the choice easier for users

Hick’s Law: Making the choice easier for users

Now let’s see a topic about keeping our users’ lives easy. “Isn’t that the theme of most articles here?” you may ask. Well, this one is especially geared towards users. Understanding Hick’s law means you can design so that more users will visit and stay on your website. Delivering a good user experience requires that first you find out the fu...

  • 212 shares
  • 2 weeks ago
Information Overload, Why it Matters and How to Combat It

Information Overload, Why it Matters and How to Combat It

Designers often need to convey information to the users of their designs. Specialists in information visualization design in particular find themselves presenting data over and over again to their users. However, it’s important when developing your designs that you don’t create “information overload” – that is presenting so much data that you le...

  • 277 shares
  • 4 weeks ago
Design checklists: What type of designer are you?

Design checklists: What type of designer are you?

What type of designer are you? Do you have a set of principles, checklists, or methods that guide your designs? Or do you prefer to start from scratch and analyze afterwards with a checklist? If you feel more comfortable looking forward, looking backwards– or if you’re a perfectionist who likes to do both – then this article will be useful to yo...

  • 261 shares
  • 3 months ago
Simplicity in Design: 4 Ways to Achieve Simplicity in Your Designs

Simplicity in Design: 4 Ways to Achieve Simplicity in Your Designs

Learn ways to achieve simplicity in your designs and recognize why certain designs are overly complex. Simplicity is evident in many of the widely-used products created by some of the most successful companies. Simplicity is also one of the key reasons why some companies do better than their competitors. Google’s search engine, Apple iPhones, an...

  • 342 shares
  • 3 weeks ago
Occam’s Razor: The simplest solution is always the best

Occam’s Razor: The simplest solution is always the best

Now that we appreciate the need for simplicity in designs better, let’s see another great concept. You may have heard of Occam’s Razor; did you know that you can apply it to web design? When you’ve got it in your “toolbox”, you’ll have an edge in the marketplace. Occam’s Razor, put simply, states: “the simplest solution is almost always the bes...

  • 373 shares
  • 4 months ago
Horror Vacui: The Fear of Emptiness

Horror Vacui: The Fear of Emptiness

Our next article is all about a scary-looking subject in that its title may look ominous. Fear not! It covers a concept that will seem familiarvery quickly. Of course, having a better understanding of it will let you work its antidote into your designs with confidence. Horror Vacui — the fear of not filling upHorror Vacui (a Latin-derived term)...

  • 211 shares
  • 3 months ago
Using Mobile Apps – The One Thumb, One Eyeball Test for Good Mobile Design

Using Mobile Apps – The One Thumb, One Eyeball Test for Good Mobile Design

Mobile designs need to take into account the way that users work with a mobile phone. That means understanding that distractions can come into play when the smartphone is in use and also ensuring that you make the input process as simple as possible to counteract their impact. Luke Wroblewski suggests the “one thumb, one eyeball” test as an effi...

  • 468 shares
  • 2 months ago