Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2014
Pub. count:50
Number of co-authors:71



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Mark Rouncefield:19
Alan J. Dix:12
Nigel Davies:12

 

 

Productive colleagues

Keith Cheverst's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Alan J. Dix:107
Tom Rodden:106
 
 
 

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Keith Cheverst

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Has also published under the name of:
"K. Cheverst"

Personal Homepage:
comp.lancs.ac.uk/computing/staff/kc/


Keith Cheverst is a Senior Lecturer in the Computing Department at Lancaster University and has recently held positions as Visiting Research Scientist at Melbourne University and Microsoft Research, Cambridge. For the last 10 years he has participated actively in the areas of Mobile computing, CSCW, HCI and Ubiquitous computing (with his interest in the latter area focussing on the study of proactive systems and situated display based interactive systems). He has served on numerous PCs and published over 80 research publications. He has also co-founded and co-organised a number of international workshops - including: HCI in Mobile Guides (a series of five), User Modelling for Ubiquitous Computing , Ubiquitous and Decentralized User Modeling and Appropriate Methods for Design in Complex and Sensitive Settings . He has presented a number of invited talks, the most recent being a keynote in Melbourne at the Simtech international workshop entitled: Social Interaction, Messaging to Place and Situated Digital Displays. He holds a BSc and PhD in Computer Science, both from Lancaster and is the PI of the EPSRC funded CASIDE project.

 

Publications by Keith Cheverst (bibliography)

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2014

Cheverst, Keith (2014). Commentary on 'Context-Aware Computing: Context-Awareness, Context-Aware User Interfaces, and Implicit Interaction' by Albrecht Schmidt

2011
 
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Salovaara, Antti, Hook, Kristina, Cheverst, Keith, Twidale, Michael, Chalmers, Matthew and Sas, Corina (2011): Appropriation and creative use: linking user studies and design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 37-40. Available online

Appropriation refers to the ways that technologies are adapted and repurposed to new purposes of use by individuals, groups or communities. This workshop brings together researchers interested in appropriation from CSCW and design. Until now, these communities have been working separately, despite their converging interests. The workshop is based on roundtable discussions that bring the participants' qualitative observations and theoretical viewpoints in contact with practical design efforts that support user creativity and appropriation.

© All rights reserved Salovaara et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Taher, Faisal and Cheverst, Keith (2011): Exploring user preferences for indoor navigation support through a combination of mobile and fixed displays. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 201-210. Available online

In this paper we explore, through a formative study, user preferences for indoor navigation support using a combination of mobile and fixed displays along with a range of navigation content such as digital 2D maps, 3D route visualizations (presented as continuous media from a first person perspective) and graphical directional arrows. It is well-established that visitors within complex building architectures (e.g. hospitals) often face challenges in finding their way and are limited to using traditional static signage or asking others for directions. Recent developments in mobile and pervasive technology however, are enabling a range of possibilities and augmenting the way in which users receive digital navigation support. Here, we discuss a formative study involving 16 participants using the prototype Hermes2 Navigation System in order to inform the development of a useful and usable interactive indoor navigation system.

© All rights reserved Taher and Cheverst and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Taylor, Nick and Cheverst, Keith (2010): Creating a rural community display with local engagement. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 218-227. Available online

We present our experiences of using an iterative, prototype-driven approach to developing social systems with the participation of communities, inspired by probe-based methodologies. This approach is illustrated by our attempts to design and understand the role of situated display technologies in a rural community, which has led to the development of a photo display and digital notice board, guided by the community's involvement.

© All rights reserved Taylor and Cheverst and/or their publisher

 
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Schmid, Falko, Hesselmann, Tobias, Boll, Susanne, Cheverst, Keith and Kulik, Lars (2010): SISSI '10: social interaction in spatially separated environments. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 501-502. Available online

Social relationships between co-workers, family members and friends play an important role in our everyday lives. They are responsible for our well-being, for a productive working atmosphere and for feeling part of our various communities. Nevertheless, it can be difficult to establish and maintain such relationships if individuals are spatially separated, e. g. working in different branch offices of a corporation, as they usually cannot interact and communicate in a natural, everyday manner. In the past, significant effort has been put into the development of planned, explicit interaction methods such as email, chat or video-conferencing. In contrast to that, much less is known about techniques to enable casual, spontaneous interactions between spatially separated social groups, e.g., occasional meetings on the office floor, by the means of implicit and more subtle methods. SISSI 2010 brings together academia and industry to present new ways of facilitating, establishing and maintaining social relationships by the means of ubiquitous systems, in order to achieve a feeling of togetherness, presence and closeness between members of spatially separated professional or private social groups. The audience of SISSI is interdisciplinary, including researchers from human computer interaction, pervasive communication, spatial cognition and communication sciences.

© All rights reserved Schmid et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Wilde, Erik, Boll, Susanne, Cheverst, Keith, Frohlich, Peter, Purves, Ross and Schoning, Johannes (2009): Location and the web: (LocWeb 2009). In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4737-4740. Available online

Location-based services are becoming increasingly Web-based, as a result of the availability of networked mobile devices and mobile Internet access. The "Location and the Web (LocWeb)" workshop targets the capabilities and constraints of Web-based location-based services, which can be implemented as browser-based applications, or as native applications using Web services. The focus of this CHI workshop is on approaches which handle the complexity of location-based services, specifically looking at location abstractions, location sharing, context-relevant information, privacy issues, and interface and interaction design. The goal of this workshop is to serve as a starting point for attaining a better understanding of how the Web has to change in order to embrace location as a first-level concept, and how these changes might be reflected in applications and user interfaces that transform the Web into a platform for location-based services.

© All rights reserved Wilde et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Schoning, Johannes, Krger, Antonio, Cheverst, Keith, Rohs, Michael, Lochtefeld, Markus and Taher, Faisal (2009): PhotoMap: using spontaneously taken images of public maps for pedestrian navigation tasks on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 14. Available online

In many mid- to large-sized cities public maps are ubiquitous. One can also find a great number of maps in parks or near hiking trails. Public maps help to facilitate orientation and provide special information to not only tourists but also to locals who just want to look up an unfamiliar place while on the go. These maps offer many advantages compared to mobile maps from services like Google Maps Mobile or Nokia Maps. They often show local landmarks and sights that are not shown on standard digital maps. Often these 'You are here' (YAH) maps are adapted to a special use case, e.g. a zoo map or a hiking map of a certain area. Being designed for a fashioned purpose these maps are often aesthetically well designed and their usage is therefore more pleasant. In this paper we present a novel technique and application called PhotoMap that uses images of 'You are here' maps taken with a GPS-enhanced mobile camera phone as background maps for on-the-fly navigation tasks. We discuss different implementations of the main challenge, namely helping the user to properly georeference the taken image with sufficient accuracy to support pedestrian navigation tasks. We present a study that discusses the suitability of various public maps for this task and we evaluate if these georeferenced photos can be used for navigation on GPS-enabled devices.

© All rights reserved Schoning et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Willis, Katharine S., Cheverst, Keith, Mueller, Claudia, Abend, Pablo and Neufeldt, Cornelius (2009): Community Practices and Locative Media. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 105. Available online

The development of locative media applications is not simply about the physical location or social setting in which the interaction occurs, but rather about situating the media within a community of practice. This workshop will provide the environment for researchers to explore the potential for locative media applications to support community practices. The workshop will highlight the many open areas that require research attention, identify key problems that need to be addressed, and also discuss approaches for solving these issues. In particular the workshop will focus on appropriate methodologies for identifying requirements, evaluating behaviour and integrating locative media in specific real-world community structures.

© All rights reserved Willis et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Taylor, Nick and Cheverst, Keith (2009): Social interaction around a rural community photo display. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (12) pp. 1037-1047. Available online

Public displays of photographs are a common sight in community spaces, yet while much attention has been given recently to the use of digital photography in the home, the community domain remains underexplored. We describe the Wray Photo Display, a public situated display for community-generated photography in an English rural village, which aims to understand the community's use of photos for social purposes and the ways in which public display technology may support these social interactions. This article presents the techniques used in designing and evaluating the display as well as understanding the community and its use of photos, and our discussion of the issues and challenges presented by this study.

© All rights reserved Taylor and Cheverst and/or Academic Press

 
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Mller, Jorg, Cheverst, Keith, Fitton, Dan, Taylor, Nick, Paczkowski, Oliver and Krger, Antonio (2009): Experiences of Supporting Local and Remote Mobile Phone Interaction in Situated Public Display Deployments. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 1 (2) pp. 1-21. Available online

Public displays and mobile phones are ubiquitous technologies that are already weaving themselves into the everyday life of urban citizens. The combination of the two enables new and novel possibilities, such as interaction with displays that are not physically accessible, extending screen real estate for mobile phones or transferring user content to and from public displays. However, current usability evaluations of prototype systems have explored only a small part of this design space, as usage of such systems is deeply embedded in and dependent on social and everyday context. In order to investigate issues surrounding appropriation and real use in social context field studies are necessary. In this paper we present our experiences with field deployments in a continuum between exploratory prototypes and technology probes. We present benefits and drawbacks of different evaluation methods, and provide a number of validated lessons from our deployments.

© All rights reserved Mller et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Schoning, Johannes, Krger, Antonio and Rohs, Michael (2008): Photomap: Snap, Grab and Walk away with a "You Are Here" Map. In: Henze, Niels, Broll, Gregor, Rukzio, Enrico, Rohs, Michael, Zimmermann, Andreas and Boll, Susanne (eds.) Mobile Interaction with the Real World 2008 - MIRW 2008 - Mobile HCI Workshop September 2, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherland. pp. 73-82. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Coulton, Paul, Bamford, William and Taylor, Nick (2008): Supporting (Mobile) User Experience at a Rural Village "Scarecrow Festival": A Formative Study of a Geolocated Photo Mashup Utilising a Situated Display. In: Henze, Niels, Broll, Gregor, Rukzio, Enrico, Rohs, Michael, Zimmermann, Andreas and Boll, Susanne (eds.) Mobile Interaction with the Real World 2008 - MIRW 2008 - Mobile HCI Workshop September 2, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherland. pp. 27-38. Available online

 
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Kray, Christian, Cheverst, Keith, Harrison, Michael D., Hamhoum, Fathi and Wagner, Jrgen (2008): Towards a location model for indoor navigation support through public displays and mobile devices. In: Henze, Niels, Broll, Gregor, Rukzio, Enrico, Rohs, Michael, Zimmermann, Andreas and Boll, Susanne (eds.) Mobile Interaction with the Real World 2008 - MIRW 2008 - Mobile HCI Workshop September 2, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherland. pp. 83-92. Available online

 
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Taylor, Nick and Cheverst, Keith (2008): "This might be stupid, but...": participatory design with community displays and postcards. In: Proceedings of OZCHI08 - the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 41-48. Available online

We describe our experiences of designing a digital community display with members of a rural community. These experiences are highlighted by the development of printed and digital postcard features for the Wray Photo Display, a public photosharing display designed with the community, which was trialled during a popular village fair where both local residents and visitors interacted with the system. This trial allowed us to examine the relative popularity and differences in usage between printed and digital postcard, and offer insights into the uses of these features with community-generated content and potential problems encountered.

© All rights reserved Taylor and Cheverst and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Daniel, Rouncefield, Mark and Graham, Connor (2007): Exploring Awareness Related Messaging Through Two Situated-Display-Based Systems. In Human Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 173-220.

This article focuses on our exploration of awareness issues through the design and long-term deployment of two systems: the Hermes office door display system (which enabled staff in a university department to post awareness messages to their door displays) and SPAM (a messaging system for supporting coordination between staff at two associated residential community care facilities). In the case of both systems, a significant number of the messages sent could be classified as relating to awareness. Furthermore, with both systems, the situatedness of displays (outside office doors in the case of Hermes and in staff offices in the case of SPAM) had a significant impact on the design and subsequent use of the deployed systems. In particular, the placement of displays provided significant context for awareness messages, including, for example, the identity of the sender of the message and the intended audience of the message. Both systems highlight the need for interaction methods that fit in with both normal working practices (and unplanned events) and that enable the user to manage communication channels. The need for appropriate levels of expressiveness and user control is also apparent: We present numerous examples of users controlling the precision of awareness information and sending awareness messages that have as much to do with playfulness as supporting coordination through activity awareness.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum

 
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Taylor, Nick, Cheverst, Keith, Fitton, Dan, Race, Nicholas J. P., Rouncefield, Mark and Graham, Connor (2007): Probing communities: study of a village photo display. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 17-24. Available online

In this paper we describe a technology probe aiming to aid understanding of how digital displays can help support communities. Using a simple photo gallery application, deployed in a central social point in a small village and displaying user-generated photos and videos, we have been able to gain an understanding of this setting, field test our device and inspire new ideas directly from members of the community. We explore the process of deploying this display, the response from residents and how the display has taken a place within the community.

© All rights reserved Taylor et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Graham, Connor, Rouncefield, Mark, Gibbs, Martin, Vetere, Frank and Cheverst, Keith (2007): How probes work. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 29-37. Available online

'Cultural probes', since first being proposed and described by Bill Gaver and his colleagues, have been adapted and appropriated for a range of purposes within a variety of technology projects. In this paper we critically review different uses of Probes and discuss common aspects of different Probe variants. We also present and critique some of the debate around Probes through describing the detail of their use in two studies: The Digital Care Project (Lancaster University) and The Mediating Intimacy Project (University of Melbourne). We then reorient the discussion around Probes towards how probes work: both as interpretative fodder for social scientists and as a resource for 'designers'. Finally we discuss new possible directions for Probes as an approach and some of the challenges confronting Probes as an approach.

© All rights reserved Graham et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Daniel, Rouncefield, Mark and Graham, Connor (2007): Exploring Awareness Related Messaging Through Two Situated-Display-Based Systems. In Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 173-220. Available online

This article focuses on our exploration of awareness issues through the design and long-term deployment of two systems: the Hermes office door display system (which enabled staff in a university department to post awareness messages to their door displays) and SPAM (a messaging system for supporting coordination between staff at two associated residential community care facilities). In the case of both systems, a significant number of the messages sent could be classified as relating to awareness. Furthermore, with both systems, the situatedness of displays (outside office doors in the case of Hermes and in staff offices in the case of SPAM) had a significant impact on the design and subsequent use of the deployed systems. In particular, the placement of displays provided significant context for awareness messages, including, for example, the identity of the sender of the message and the intended audience of the message. Both systems highlight the need for interaction methods that fit in with both normal working practices (and unplanned events) and that enable the user to manage communication channels. The need for appropriate levels of expressiveness and user control is also apparent: We present numerous examples of users controlling the precision of awareness information and sending awareness messages that have as much to do with playfulness as supporting coordination through activity awareness.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Daniel, Rouncefield, Mark and Graham, Connor (2007): Exploring Awareness Related Messaging Through Two Situated-Display-Based Systems. In Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 173-220. Available online

This article focuses on our exploration of awareness issues through the design and long-term deployment of two systems: the Hermes office door display system (which enabled staff in a university department to post awareness messages to their door displays) and SPAM (a messaging system for supporting coordination between staff at two associated residential community care facilities). In the case of both systems, a significant number of the messages sent could be classified as relating to awareness. Furthermore, with both systems, the situatedness of displays (outside office doors in the case of Hermes and in staff offices in the case of SPAM) had a significant impact on the design and subsequent use of the deployed systems. In particular, the placement of displays provided significant context for awareness messages, including, for example, the identity of the sender of the message and the intended audience of the message. Both systems highlight the need for interaction methods that fit in with both normal working practices (and unplanned events) and that enable the user to manage communication channels. The need for appropriate levels of expressiveness and user control is also apparent: We present numerous examples of users controlling the precision of awareness information and sending awareness messages that have as much to do with playfulness as supporting coordination through activity awareness.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

2006
 
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Crabtree, Andy, French, Andrew, Greenhalgh, Chris, Benford, Steve, Cheverst, Keith, Fitton, Dan, Rouncefield, Mark and Graham, Connor (2006): Developing Digital Records: Early Experiences of Record and Replay. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 15 (4) pp. 281-319. Available online

In this paper we consider the development of 'digital records' to support ethnographic study of interaction and collaboration in ubiquitous computing environments and articulate the core concept of 'record and replay' through two case studies. One focuses on the utility of digital records, or records of interaction generated by a computer system, to ethnographic inquiry and highlights the mutually supportive nature of digital records and ethnographic methods. The other focuses on the work it takes to make digital records support ethnography, particularly the work of description and representation that is required to reconcile the fragmented character of interaction in ubiquitous computing environments. The work involved in 'making digital records work' highlights requirements for the design of tools to support the endeavour and informs the development of a Replay Tool. This tool enables ethnographers to visualize the data content of digital records; to extract sequences of relevance to analysis and remove non-relevant features; to marry recorded content with external resources, such as video; to add content from internal and external resources through annotation; and to reorder digital records to reflect the interactional order of events rather than the recorded order of events.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Kray, Christian, Cheverst, Keith, Fitton, Dan, Sas, Corina, Patterson, John F., Rouncefield, Mark and Stahl, Christoph (2006): Sharing control of dispersed situated displays between nand residential users. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 61-68. Available online

As the number of public displays in the environment increases, new opportunities open up to improve situated interaction and to enable new kinds of applications. In order to make distributed display resources available to nomadic users, a key issue to address is how control can be dynamically shared between display users. It is important to study how control over a shared display can be acquired, released or shared by nomadic and residential users given their competing demands for display resources. In this paper, we present a system and a user study investigating these issues in the context of two applications both competing for display resources provided by a deployment of interactive office doorplates. The first application (Hermes II) provides situated note leaving and messaging services whereas the second one (GAUDI) supports user navigating a university department. Office occupants (i.e., residential users) can control whether the navigation application may (temporarily) use their doorplate display (thus giving priority to the navigation needs of nomadic users to the department). We report on findings from a user study, and discuss interface design implications for specifying display control.

© All rights reserved Kray et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Saslis-Lagoudakis, Georgios, Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Dan and Rouncefield, Mark (2006): Hermes@Home: supporting awareness and intimacy between distant family members. In: Kjeldskov, Jesper and Paay, Jane (eds.) Proceedings of OZCHI06, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 23-30. Available online

This paper presents the Hermes@Home system, which supports awareness (through messaging) between members of a home. Person(s) 'away' from the home can send messages via a web portal to an 'always on' 'information appliance' style display situated in the home, while people at home can scribble messages on the touch sensitive display of this unit for reception by the person(s) away from the home. The system was conceived as a technology probe and serves as a tool in investigating related issues such as awareness and intimacy between home inhabitants. It supplements existing communication methods by providing a highly expressive and always-available messaging method. We present some findings and initial results from a preliminary analysis of messages sent through the system during four deployments, identifying emerging themes in message content. In addition, we also present some of the issues that have surfaced through these deployments in a domestic environment.

© All rights reserved Saslis-Lagoudakis et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kray, Christian, Cheverst, Keith, Fitton, Dan, Sas, Corina, Patterson, John, Rouncefield, Mark and Stahl, Christoph (2006): Sharing control of dispersed situated displays between nand residential users. In: Nieminen, Marko and Roykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 61-68. Available online

2005
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Daniel, Kray, Chris, Rouncefield, Mark, Sas, Corina, Saslis-Lagoudakis, George and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2005): Exploring bluetooth based mobile phone interaction with the hermes photo display. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 47-54. Available online

One of the most promising possibilities for supporting user interaction with public displays is the use of personal mobile phones. Furthermore, by utilising Bluetooth users should have the capability to interact with displays without incurring personal financial connectivity costs. However, despite the relative maturity of Bluetooth as a standard and its widespread adoption in today's mobile phones, little exploration seems to have taken place in this area -- despite its apparent significant potential. This paper describe the findings of an exploratory study involving our Hermes Photo Display which has been extended to enable users with a suitable phone to both send and receive pictures over Bluetooth. We present both the technical challenges of working with Bluetooth and, through our user study, we present initial insights into general user acceptability issues and the potential for such a display to facilitate notions of community.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Davies, Nigel, Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J. and Hesse, Andre (2005): Understanding the role of image recognition in mobile tour guides. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 191-198. Available online

Users of mobile tour guides often express a strong desire for the system to be able to provide information on arbitrary objects they encounter during their visit -- akin to pointing to a building or attraction and saying "what's that?" to a human tour guide. This paper reports on a field study in which we investigated user reaction to the use of digital image capture and recognition to support such functionality. Our results provide an insight into usage patterns and likely user reaction to mobile tour guides that use digital photography for real-time object recognition. These results include the counter-intuitive observation that a significant class of users appear happy to use image recognition even when this is a more complex, lengthy and error-prone process than traditional solutions. Careful analysis of user behavior during the field trails also provides evidence that it may be possible to classify tourists according to the methods by which they prefer to acquire information about tourist attractions in their vicinity. If shown to be generally true these results have important implications for designers of future mobile tour guide systems.

© All rights reserved Davies et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cheverst, Keith and Schmidt-Belz, Barbara (2005): 4th international workshop on: "HCI in mobile guides". In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 359-360. Available online

This fourth workshop in the series of workshops on 'HCI in Mobile Guides' once again aims to bring together both researchers and practitioners who develop and evaluate mobile guides, i.e. systems designed to guide a user who is moving in a physical environment by giving directions and supplying relevant information and access to services via some form of mobile device. Application examples of mobile guides include: mobile tourism services, museum/exhibition guides, support for building communities and context-aware directory services. The particular focus of this workshop is on establishing guidelines for fostering the development of usable mobile guide systems based on practical experience and evaluations. Following review by the program committee, accepted papers will be presented and discussed at the workshop.

© All rights reserved Cheverst and Schmidt-Belz and/or ACM Press

 
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Graham, Connor, Cheverst, Keith and Rouncefield, Mark (2005): Technology for the humdrum: trajectories, interactional needs and a care setting. In: Proceedings of OZCHI05, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 1-10. Available online

We report on a care setting where staff looking after ex-psychiatric hospital patients were supported by mobile and stationary communications technology (e.g. mobile phones and a messaging system) and physical artefacts (e.g. whiteboards and Post-It notes). Building on previous ethnographic investigations, we show that the notion of trajectory (or an ongoing course of action) was important for understanding staff's care work. We argue that sensitivity to this notion was helpful in identifying the key transitions, cycles, plans and management issues in staff's ongoing work. We present verified trajectory-informed scenarios emerging from fieldwork and show that these snapshots of work were useful for establishing current and future interactional needs among staff and residents. Finally we describe issues pertinent to new technology design emerging from these trajectory-informed scenarios and discuss the usefulness of the concept for informing socio-technical system design.

© All rights reserved Graham et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Graham, Connor, Cheverst, Keith, Rouncefield, Mark and Kray, Christian (2005): Going more public: situated display design in a care setting through co-realisation. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Designing for User Experiences DUX05 2005. p. 18. Available online

We describe findings from field work at a residential community care facility for ex-psychiatric hospital patients. The field work focused on distributed care-workers who looked after residents at the two sites forming the facility. We reflect on the process of co-realisation that verified our understanding of the setting and generated initial technology designs. This involved sharing scenarios descriptive of typical activity with care workers and presenting a demonstration of networked public display technology in use. We then illustrate how co-realisation both refined our understanding of care workers' work needs and informed us about how and where public display technology could be deployed. Finally, we present an initial design for a public display.

© All rights reserved Graham et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Daniel, Kray, Christian, Rouncefield, Mark, Sas, Corina, Saslis-Lagoudakis, George and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2005): Exploring bluetooth based mobile phone interaction with the hermes photo display. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 47-54. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith and Schmidt-Belz, Barbara (2005): 4th international workshop on: "HCI in mobile guides. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 359-360. Available online

 
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Davies, Nigel, Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J. and Hesse, Andre (2005): Understanding the role of image recognition in mobile tour guides. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 191-198. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Dan, Kray, Christian, Rouncefield, Mark, Saslis-Lagoudakis, George and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2005): Exploring Mobile Phone Interaction with Situated Displays. In: Rukzio, Enrico, Hkkil, Jonna, Spasojevic, Mirjana, Mntyjrvi, Jani and Ravi, Nishkam (eds.) PERMID 2005 - Pervasive Mobile Interaction Devices - Mobile Devices as Pervasive User Interfaces and Interaction Devices - Workshop in conjunction with The 3rd International Conference on Pervasive Computing PERVASIVE 2005 May 11, 2005, Munich, Germany. pp. 43-47. Available online

 
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Fitton, Daniel, Cheverst, Keith, Kray, Christian, Dix, Alan J., Rouncefield, Mark and Saslis-Lagoudakis, George (2005): Rapid prototyping and user-centered design of interactive display-based systems. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 58-66. Available online

2004
 
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Cheverst, Keith and Schmidt-Belz, Barbara (2004): 3rd International Workshop on: "HCI in Mobile Guides. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 521-522. Available online

2003
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Clarke, Karen, Fitton, Dan, Rouncefield, Mark, Crabtree, Andy and Hemmings, Terry (2003): SPAM on the menu: the practical use of remote messaging in community care. In: Proceedings of the 2003 ACM Conference on Universal Usability 2003. pp. 23-29. Available online

This paper presents some early design work of the 'Digital Care' project, developing technologies to assist care in the community for user groups with different support needs. Our focus is on developing a SMS Public Asynchronous Messenger (SPAM) system for SMS messaging to a situated display in hostels for ex-psychiatric patients run by a charitable Trust. Such settings pose both methodological and design challenges. We face the methodological challenge to uncover requirements in such a sensitive domain by using ethnography, cultural probes and user workshops. The design challenge in this care setting is to provide support rather than new forms of dependence, and we report on early experiences of the deployed system.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Clarke, K., Cheverst, Keith, Dewsbury, G., Fitton, D., Hughes, J., Rouncefield, Mark, Sommerville, Ian, Hemmings, T. and Rodden, Tom (2003): Cultural Probes: Eliciting Requirements for Dependable Ubiquitous Computing in the Home. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction June 22-27, 2003, Crete, Greece. pp. 329-333.

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Clarke, K., Dewsbury, G., Hemmings, T., Kember, S., Rodden, Tom and Rouncefield, Mark (2003): Designing assistive technologies for medication regimes in care settings. In Universal Access in the Information Society, 2 (3) pp. 235-242. Available online

This paper presents some early design work of the Care in the Digital Community research project begun under the EPSRC IRC Network project Equator. Gaining a comprehensive understanding of user requirements in care settings poses interesting methodological challenges. This paper details some methodological options for working in the domestic domain and documents the translation of research into design recommendations. We report on the importance of medication issues in a hostel for former psychiatric patients and present an early prototype of a medication manager designed to be sensitive to the particular requirements of the setting.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Borntrger, Christian, Cheverst, Keith, Davies, Nigel, Dix, Alan J., Friday, Adrian and Seitz, Jochen (2003): Experiments with Multi-modal Interfaces in a Context-Aware City Guide. In: Chittaro, Luca (ed.) Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - 5th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2003 September 8-11, 2003, Udine, Italy. pp. 116-130. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Dix, Alan J., Fitton, Dan, Friday, Adrian and Rouncefield, Mark (2003): Exploring the Utility of Remote Messaging and Situated Office Door Displays. In: Chittaro, Luca (ed.) Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - 5th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2003 September 8-11, 2003, Udine, Italy. pp. 336-341. Available online

 
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Fitton, Dan and Cheverst, Keith (2003): Experiences Managing and Maintaining a Collection of Interactive Office Door Displays. In: Aarts, Emile H. L., Collier, Ren, Loenen, Evert van and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) EUSAI 2003 - Ambient Intelligence - First European Symposium November 3-4, 2003, Veldhoven, The Netherlands. pp. 394-409. Available online

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Hemmings, Terry, Rodden, Tom, Cheverst, Keith, Clarke, Karen and Dewsbury, Guy (2003): Designing with Care: Adapting Cultural Probes to Inform Design in Sensitive Settings. In: Viller, Stephen and Wyeth, Peta (eds.) Proceedings of OzCHI 2003, New Directions in Interaction Information environments, Media and Technology November 26-28, 2003, Brisbane, Australia. pp. 4-13. Available online

We report on the methodological process of developing computer support for former psychiatric patients living in residential care settings, for older members of the community, and disabled people living at home. Methods for identifying user needs in such sensitive settings are underdeveloped and the situation presents a very complex set of design challenges. In particular, the highly personal character of such settings presents conventional observational techniques, such as ethnography, with obdurate problems that make direct observation intrusive, disruptive and inappropriate on occasion. Direct observation requires supplementation in sensitive settings. Accordingly, we report on our experiences of adapting Cultural Probes to explore care settings, to develop a design dialogue with participants, and to gather information about their unique needs.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or University of Queensland

2002
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Mitchell, Keith and Davies, Nigel (2002): Exploring Context-aware Information Push. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 6 (4) pp. 276-281. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Mitchell, Keith and Davies, Nigel (2002): The role of adaptive hypermedia in a context-aware tourist GUIDE. In Communications of the ACM, 45 (5) pp. 47-51. Available online

2001
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Davies, Nigel, Mitchell, Keith and Efstratiou, Christos (2001): Using Context as a Crystal Ball: Rewards and Pitfalls. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (1) pp. 8-11. Available online

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Davies, Nigel, Cheverst, Keith, Mitchell, Keith and Efrat, Alon (2001): Using and Determining Location in a Context-Sensitive Tour Guide. In IEEE Computer, 34 (8) pp. 35-41. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Smith, Gareth, Mitchell, Keith, Friday, Adrian and Davies, Nigel (2001): The role of shared context in supporting cooperation between city visitors. In Computers & Graphics, 25 (4) pp. 555-562. Available online

2000
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Davies, Nigel, Mitchell, Keith, Friday, Adrian and Efstratiou, Christos (2000): Developing a Context-Aware Electronic Tourist Guide: Some Issues and Experiences. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 17-24. Available online

In this paper, we describe our experiences of developing and evaluating GUIDE, an intelligent electronic tourist guide. The GUIDE system has been built to overcome many of the limitations of the traditional information and navigation tools available to city visitors. For example, group-based tours are inherently inflexible with fixed starting times and fixed durations and (like most guidebooks) are constrained by the need to satisfy the interests of the majority rather than the specific interests of individuals. Following a period of requirements capture, involving experts in the field of tourism, we developed and installed a system for use by visitors to Lancaster. The system combines mobile computing technologies with a wireless infrastructure to present city visitors with information tailored to both their personal and environmental contexts. In this paper we present an evaluation of GUIDE, focusing on the quality of the visitor's experience when using the system.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
1999
 
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Cheverst, Keith, Davies, Nigel, Mitchell, Keith and Friday, Adrian (1999): The Role of Connectivity in Supporting Context-Sensitive Applications. In: Gellersen, Hans-Werner (ed.) Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing - First International Symposium - HUC99 September 27-29, 1999, Karlsruhe, Germany. pp. 193-207. Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Blair, Gordon S., Davies, Nigel and Friday, Adrian (1999): The Support of Mobile-Awareness in Collaborative Groupware. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 3 (1) . Available online

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Mitchell, Keith and Davies, Nigel (1999): Design of an object model for a context sensitive tourist GUIDE. In Computers & Graphics, 23 (6) pp. 883-891. Available online

 
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