Publication statistics

Pub. period:1996-2012
Pub. count:36
Number of co-authors:49



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James A. Landay:5
Sunny Consolvo:5
Mark S. Ackerman:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

David W. McDonald's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Loren Terveen:69
Mark S. Ackerman:67
 
 
 

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David W. McDonald

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David W. McDonald is Associate Professor at the University of Washington. He has an MS (1992) in Computer Science, California State University Hayward; and an MS (1995) and PhD (2000) in Information and Computer Science. His research interests include Computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), human-computer interaction (HCI), collaborative systems design, software architecture, software engineering, ethnographic study, social analysis of technology and social theory.

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Publications by David W. McDonald (bibliography)

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2012
 
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McDonald, David W., Gokhman, Stephanie and Zachry, Mark (2012): Building for social translucence: a domain analysis and prototype system. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 637-646.

The relationships and work that facilitate content creation in large online contributor system are not always visible. Social translucence is a stance toward the design of systems that allows users to better understand collaborative system participation through awareness of contributions and interactions. Like many socio-technical constructs, social translucence is not something that can be simply added after a system is built; it should be at the core of system design. In this paper, we conduct a domain analysis to understand the space of architectural support required to facilitate social translucence in systems. We describe an instantiation of those requirements as a system architecture that relies on data from Wikipedia and illustrate how translucence can be propagated to some basic visualizations which we have created for Wikipedia users. We close with some reflections on the state of social translucence research and some openings for this important design perspective.

© All rights reserved McDonald et al. and/or ACM Press

2011

McDonald, David W. (2011). Commentary on 'Social Computing' by Thomas Erickson

 
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McDonald, David W., Javanmardi, Sara and Zachry, Mark (2011): Finding patterns in behavioral observations by automatically labeling forms of wikiwork in Barnstars. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration 2011. pp. 15-24.

Our everyday observations about the behaviors of others around us shape how we decide to act or interact. In social media the ability to observe and interpret others' behavior is limited. This work describes one approach to leverage everyday behavioral observations to develop tools that could improve understanding and sense making capabilities of contributors, managers and researchers of social media systems. One example of behavioral observation is Wikipedia Barnstars. Barnstars are a type of award recognizing the activities of Wikipedia editors. We mine the entire English Wikipedia to extract barnstar observations. We develop a multi-label classifier based on a random forest technique to recognize and label distinct forms of observed and acknowledged activity. We evaluate the classifier through several means including use of separate training and testing datasets and the by application of the classifier to previously unlabeled data. We use the classifier to identify Wikipedia editors who have been observed with some predominant types of behavior and explore whether those patterns of behavior are evident and how observers seem to be making the observations. We discuss how these types of activity observations can be used to develop tools and potentially improve understanding and analysis in wikis and other online communities.

© All rights reserved McDonald et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Javanmardi, Sara, McDonald, David W. and Lopes, Cristina V. (2011): Vandalism detection in Wikipedia: a high-performing, feature-rich model and its reduction through Lasso. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration 2011. pp. 82-90.

User generated content (UGC) constitutes a significant fraction of the Web. However, some wiiki-based sites, such as Wikipedia, are so popular that they have become a favorite target of spammers and other vandals. In such popular sites, human vigilance is not enough to combat vandalism, and tools that detect possible vandalism and poor-quality contributions become a necessity. The application of machine learning techniques holds promise for developing efficient online algorithms for better tools to assist users in vandalism detection. We describe an efficient and accurate classifier that performs vandalism detection in UGC sites. We show the results of our classifier in the PAN Wikipedia dataset. We explore the effectiveness of a combination of 66 individual features that produce an AUC of 0.9553 on a test dataset -- the best result to our knowledge. Using Lasso optimization we then reduce our feature -- rich model to a much smaller and more efficient model of 28 features that performs almost as well -- the drop in AUC being only 0.005. We describe how this approach can be generalized to other user generated content systems and describe several applications of this classifier to help users identify potential vandalism.

© All rights reserved Javanmardi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Gokhman, Stephanie, McDonald, David W. and Zachry, Mark (2011): Wiki architectures as social translucence enablers. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration 2011. pp. 203-204.

Whether novice or expert, it is useful for contributors to understand the environment to which they are contributing, including the relationships of other users to the content and to users. However, the relationships and work that enable content creation in an online contributor system, such as Wikipedia, are not always visible. To expose and better understand these relationships, we have built an information visualization toolkit called Re:Flex to support components of social translucence in Wikipedia, with broad applicability to other contributor systems. By mimicking the flexible, fluid architecture of a wiki within the blackboard architecture of this visualization toolkit, we demonstrate how the composable interactions inherent to contributor systems can be mirrored in the tools that support the work which creates them.

© All rights reserved Gokhman et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Civan-Hartzler, Andrea, McDonald, David W., Powell, Chris, Skeels, Meredith M., Mukai, Marlee and Pratt, Wanda (2010): Bringing the field into focus: user-centered design of a patient expertise locator. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1675-1684.

Managing personal aspects of health is challenging for many patients, particularly those facing a serious condition such as cancer. Finding experienced patients, who can share their knowledge from managing a similar health situation, is of tremendous value. Users of health-related social software form a large base of such knowledge, yet these tools often lack features needed to locate peers with expertise. Informed directly by our field work with breast cancer patients, we designed a patient expertise locator for users of online health communities. Using feedback from two focus groups with breast cancer survivors, we took our design through two iterations. Focus groups concluded that expertise locating features proved useful for extending social software. They guided design enhancements by suggesting granular user control through (1) multiple mechanisms to identify expertise, (2) detailed user profiles to select expertise, and (3) varied collaboration levels. Our user-centered approach links field work to design through close collaboration with patients. By illustrating trade-offs made when sharing sensitive health information, our findings inform the incorporation of expertise locating features into social software for patients.

© All rights reserved Civan-Hartzler et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ackerman, Mark S., Muramatsu, Jack and McDonald, David W. (2010): Social regulation in an online game: uncovering the problematics of code. In: GROUP10 International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2010. pp. 173-182.

More and more interaction is becoming code-based. Indeed, in online worlds, it is all there is. If software is providing a new basis for social interaction, then changing the infrastructure of interaction may necessarily change social interaction in important ways. As such, it is critical to understand the implications of code -- we want to know what the use of code means for socio-technical design. In this paper, based on an ethnographic study of an online game, we examine social regulation in an online game world as a case study of socio-technical design using code. We wanted to know how changing interaction based in code conditioned use in our site. We found that code changed social regulation in three specific ways. First, code made some user actions that were socially unwanted to be immediately visible. Second, code could prevent some actions from occurring or punish users immediately. Finally, software was not able to see all action. Some user actions were too nuanced or subtle for code to catch; others were too ambiguous to place into code. Following Agre, we argue i that a "grammar of action" resulting from the use of code limits the kinds of behaviors that can be seen and dealt with. These findings suggest that there is more than just a gap between the social world and technical capabilities. There are new possibilities, tradeoffs, and limitations that must be considered in socio-technical design, and all come simultaneously.

© All rights reserved Ackerman et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Consolvo, Sunny, McDonald, David W. and Landay, James A. (2009): Theory-driven design strategies for technologies that support behavior change in everyday life. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 405-414.

In this paper, we propose design strategies for persuasive technologies that help people who want to change their everyday behaviors. Our strategies use theory and prior work to substantially extend a set of existing design goals. Our extensions specifically account for social characteristics and other tactics that should be supported by persuasive technologies that target long-term discretionary use throughout everyday life. We used these strategies to design and build a system that encourages people to lead a physically active lifestyle. Results from two field studies of the system -- a three-week trial and a three-month experiment -- have shown that the system was successful at helping people maintain a more physically active lifestyle and validate the usefulness of the strategies.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Torrey, Cristen, Churchill, Elizabeth F. and McDonald, David W. (2009): Learning how: the search for craft knowledge on the internet. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1371-1380.

Communicating the subtleties of a craft technique, like putting a zipper into a garment or throwing a clay pot, can be challenging even when working side by side. Yet How-To content -- including text, images, animations, and videos -- is available online for a wide variety of crafts. We interviewed people engaged in various crafts to investigate how online resources contributed to their craft practice. We found that participants sought creative inspiration as well as technical clarification online. In this domain, keyword search can be difficult, so supplemental strategies are used. Participants sought information iteratively, because they often needed to enact their knowledge in order to evaluate it. Our description of people learning how allows us to elaborate existing understandings of information-seeking behavior by considering how search originates and is evaluated in knowledge domains involving physical objects and physical processes.

© All rights reserved Torrey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Civan, Andrea, McDonald, David W., Unruh, Kenton T. and Pratt, Wanda (2009): Locating patient expertise in everyday life. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 291-300.

Coping with a new health issue often requires individuals to acquire knowledge and skills to manage personal health. Many patients turn to one another for experiential expertise outside the formal bounds of the health-care system. Internet-based social software can facilitate expertise sharing among patients, but provides only limited ways for users to locate sources of patient expertise. Although much prior research has investigated expertise location and systems to augment expertise sharing in workplace organizations, the transferability of this knowledge to other contexts, such as personal health, is unclear. Guided by expertise locating frameworks drawn from prior work, we conducted a field study to investigate expertise locating in the informal and everyday context of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Similarities between patients' expertise locating practices and practices of professionals in workplace organizations suggest similar support strategies could apply in both contexts. However, unlike professionals, unsolicited advice often triggered patients to locate expertise. They identified expertise through various forms of gatekeeping. The high-stakes nature of problems patients faced also led them to use triangulation strategies in anticipation of breakdowns in expertise location. Based on these key differences, we explored five design additions to social software that could support patients in their critical need to locate patient expertise.

© All rights reserved Civan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Sease, Robin and McDonald, David W. (2009): Musical fingerprints: collaboration around home media collections. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 331-340.

As people collect more and more digital music, photos, and video, the growing scale of the collection challenges how families share and collaborate around home media collections. We studied the intersection between physical and digital media collections. Through 20 two hour, in home interviews, we explored the when, why, and how of the households' organization, access and sharing. Our grounded approach is framed through the use of the media lifecycle and the spectrum of intimacy of the collector and others involved in the stages of the lifecycle. We found a range of accommodations to facilitate collaboration around media collections in the home. For example, media collections often begin with an individual, but as they become shared and integrated into a household, a member of the household will often play a key curatorial role that includes making changes to the organizational scheme, setting aside sub-collections and selecting items to play that account for the entire household's taste. Our findings identify key practices that can inform the design of future media software for the home.

© All rights reserved Sease and McDonald and/or their publisher

 
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Consolvo, Sunny, Klasnja, Predrag, McDonald, David W. and Landay, James A. (2009): Goal-setting considerations for persuasive technologies that encourage physical activity. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Persuasive Technology 2009. p. 8.

Goal-setting has been shown to be an effective strategy for changing behavior; therefore employing goal-setting in persuasive technologies could be an effective way to encourage behavior change. In our work, we are developing persuasive technologies to encourage individuals to live healthy lifestyles with a focus on being physically active. As part of our investigations, we have explored individuals' reactions to goal-setting, specifically goal sources (i.e., who should set the individual's goal) and goal timeframes (i.e., over what time period should an individual have to achieve the goal). In this paper, we present our findings related to various approaches for implementing goal-setting in a persuasive technology to encourage physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Erickson, Thomas and McDonald, David W. (2008): HCI Remixed: Reflections on Works that Have Influenced the HCI Community. Cambridge, Massachusetts, MIT Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Usability Evaluation: [/encyclopedia/usability_evaluation.html]


 
 
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Consolvo, Sunny, McDonald, David W., Toscos, Tammy, Chen, Mike Y., Froehlich, Jon, Harrison, Beverly L., Klasnja, Predrag, LaMarca, Anthony, LeGrand, Louis, Libby, Ryan, Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2008): Activity sensing in the wild: a field trial of ubifit garden. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1797-1806.

Recent advances in small inexpensive sensors, low-power processing, and activity modeling have enabled applications that use on-body sensing and machine learning to infer people's activities throughout everyday life. To address the growing rate of sedentary lifestyles, we have developed a system, UbiFit Garden, which uses these technologies and a personal, mobile display to encourage physical activity. We conducted a 3-week field trial in which 12 participants used the system and report findings focusing on their experiences with the sensing and activity inference. We discuss key implications for systems that use on-body sensing and activity inference to encourage physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Beschastnikh, Ivan, Kriplean, Travis and McDonald, David W. (2008): Wikipedian Self-Governance in Action: Motivating the Policy Lens. In: ICWSM 08 Proceedings of the International Conference on Weblogs and Social Media 2008. .

 
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Kriplean, Travis, Beschastnikh, Ivan and McDonald, David W. (2008): Articulations of wikiwork: uncovering valued work in wikipedia through barnstars. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 47-56.

Successful online communities have complex cooperative arrangements, articulations of work, and integration practices. They require technical infrastructure to support a broad division of labor. Yet the research literature lacks empirical studies that detail which types of work are valued by participants in an online community. A content analysis of Wikipedia barnstars -- personalized tokens of appreciation given to participants -- reveals a wide range of valued work extending far beyond simple editing to include social support, administrative actions, and types of articulation work. Our analysis develops a theoretical lens for understanding how wiki software supports the creation of articulations of work. We give implications of our results for communities engaged in large-scale collaborations.

© All rights reserved Kriplean et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pedersen, Elin Rnby and McDonald, David W. (2008): Relating documents via user activity: the missing link. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 389-392.

In this paper we describe a system for creating and exposing relationships between documents: a user's interaction with digital objects (like documents) is interpreted as links -- to be discovered and maintained by the system. Such relationships are created automatically, requiring no priming by the user. Using a very simple set of heuristics, we demonstrate the uniquely useful relationships that can be established between documents that have been touched by the user. Furthermore, this mechanism for relationship building is media agnostic, thus discovering relationships that would not be found by conventional content based approaches. We describe a proof-of-concept implementation of this basic idea and discuss a couple of natural expansions of the scope of user activity monitoring.

© All rights reserved Pedersen and McDonald and/or ACM Press

 
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Consolvo, Sunny, Klasnja, Predrag V., McDonald, David W., Avrahami, Daniel, Froehlich, Jon, LeGrand, Louis, Libby, Ryan, Mosher, Keith and Landay, James A. (2008): Flowers or a robot army?: encouraging awareness & activity with personal, mobile displays. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 54-63.

 
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Yang, Jeonghwa, Schilit, Bill N. and McDonald, David W. (2008): Activity Recognition for the Digital Home. In IEEE Computer, 41 (4) pp. 102-104.

 
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Consolvo, Sunny, McDonald, David W., Toscos, Tammy, Chen, Mike Y., Froehlich, Jon, Harrison, Beverly, Klasnja, Predrag, LaMarca, Anthony, LeGrand, Louis, Libby, Ryan, Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2008): Activity Sensing in the Wild: A Field Trial of UbiFit Garden. In , .

Recent advances in small inexpensive sensors, low-power processing, and activity modeling have enabled applications that use on-body sensing and machine learning to infer people’s activities throughout everyday life. To address the growing rate of sedentary lifestyles, we have developed a system, UbiFit Garden, which uses these technologies and a personal, mobile display to encourage physical activity. We conducted a 3-week field trial in which 12 participants used the system and report findings focusing on their experiences with the sensing and activity inference. We discuss key implications for systems that use on-body sensing and activity inference to encourage physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Kriplean, Travis, Beschastnikh, Ivan, McDonald, David W. and Golder, Scott A. (2007): Community, consensus, coercion, control: cs*w or how policy mediates mass participation. In: GROUP07: International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2007. pp. 167-176.

When large groups cooperate, issues of conflict and control surface because of differences in perspective. Managing such diverse views is a persistent problem in cooperative group work. The Wikipedian community has responded with an evolving body of policies that provide shared principles, processes, and strategies for collaboration. We employ a grounded approach to study a sample of active talk pages and examine how policies are employed as contributors work towards consensus. Although policies help build a stronger community, we find that ambiguities in policies give rise to power plays. This lens demonstrates that support for mass collaboration must take into account policy and power.

© All rights reserved Kriplean et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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McDonald, David W., McCarthy, Joseph F., Soroczak, Suzanne, Nguyen, David H. and Rashid, Al Mamunur (2007): Proactive displays: Supporting awareness in fluid social environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 14 (4) p. 16.

Academic conferences provide a social space for people to present their work and interact with one another. However, opportunities for interaction are unevenly distributed among the attendees. We seek to extend the opportunities for interaction among attendees by using technology to enable them to reveal information about their background and interests in different settings. We evaluate a suite of applications that augment three physical social spaces at an academic conference. The applications were designed to augment formal conference paper sessions and informal breaks. A mixture of qualitative observation and survey response data are used to frame the impacts from both individual and group perspectives. Respondents reported on their interactions and serendipitous findings of shared interests with other attendees. However, some respondents also identify distracting aspects of the augmentation. Our discussion relates these results to existing theory of group behavior in public places and how these social space augmentations relate to awareness as well as the problem of shared interaction models.

© All rights reserved McDonald et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Torrey, Cristen and McDonald, David W. (2007): How-To Web Pages. In IEEE Computer, 40 (8) pp. 96-97.

 
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Torrey, Cristen, McDonald, David W., Schilit, Bill N. and Bly, Sara A. (2007): How-To Pages: Informal Systems of Expertise Sharing. In: Proceedings of the Tenth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2007. pp. 391-410.

The How-To has recently emerged as a genre of online content that describes how something is done. This study focuses on computer and electronics hobbyists and their use of How-Tos -- how hobbyists use existing knowledge to solve technical challenges, how they document their new knowledge for one another, and how they exchange help and feedback. Our analysis describes How-To knowledge sharing as a fully decentralized expertise-location system in which the How-To functions as both a broadcast of the author's expertise and a personal portfolio.

© All rights reserved Torrey et al. and/or Springer

 
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McDonald, David W. (2007): Visual Conversation Styles in Web Communities. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 76.

 
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Erickson, Thomas and McDonald, David W. (2007): HCI Remixed: Reflections on Works That Have Influenced the HCI Community. The MIT Press

2004
 
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McCarthy, Joseph F., McDonald, David W., Soroczak, Suzanne, Nguyen, David H. and Rashid, Al Mamunur (2004): Augmenting the social space of an academic conference. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 39-48.

Academic conferences provide a social space for people to present their work, learn about others' work, and interact informally with one another. However, opportunities for interaction are unevenly distributed among the attendees. We seek to extend these opportunities by allowing attendees to easily reveal something about their background and interests in different settings through the use of proactive displays: computer displays coupled with sensors that can sense and respond to the people nearby. We designed, implemented and deployed a suite of proactive display applications at a recent academic conference: AutoSpeakerID augmented formal conference paper sessions; Ticket2Talk augmented informal coffee breaks. A mixture of qualitative observation and survey response data are used to frame the impacts of these applications from both individual and group perspectives, highlighting the creation of new opportunities for both interaction and distraction. We end with a discussion of how these social space augmentations relate to the concepts of focus and nimbus as well as the problem of shared interaction models.

© All rights reserved McCarthy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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McDonald, David W., Weng, Chunhua and Gennari, John H. (2004): The multiple views of inter-organizational authoring. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 564-573.

Collaborative authoring is a common workplace task. Yet, despite improvements in word processors, communication software, and file sharing, many problems continue to plague co-authors. We conducted a qualitative study in a setting where participants are loosely connected, physically separated, and work together over a period of 4-9 months to author a complex technical document-a clinical trial protocol. Our study differs from most prior work in that the collaboration is longer-lived, and that the collaborators do not share equivalent status, background, nor domains of expertise. Our data demonstrates that the participants do not share the same view or representation of the authoring process, even though it has a long organizational history. Nonetheless, the participants can still coordinate their activity while maintaining only partially consistent representations of what they are doing. We contend that partial consistency in the participants' concept of the collaborative process is a feature for their asynchronous collaboration at a distance. Based on our findings we suggest a number of improvements for both tools and tool usage that have direct impact on support for collaborative authoring.

© All rights reserved McDonald et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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McDonald, David W. (2003): Recommending collaboration with social networks: a comparative evaluation. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 593-600.

 
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McDonald, David W. (2003): Ubiquitous Recommendation Systems. In IEEE Computer, 36 (10) pp. 111-112.

2001
 
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McDonald, David W. (2001): Evaluating expertise recommendations. In: Ellis, Clarence and Zigurs, Ilze (eds.) Proceedings of the International ACM SIGGROUP Conference on Supporting Group Work 2001 September 30 - October 3, 2001, Boulder, Colorado, USA. pp. 214-223.

Finding a person who has the expertise to solve a specific problem is an important application of recommender systems to a difficult organizational problem. Prior systems have made attempts to implement solutions to this problem, but few systems have undergone systematic user evaluation. This work describes a systematic evaluation of the Expertise Recommender (ER), a system that recommends people who are likely to have expertise in a specific problem. ER and the organizational context for which it was designed are described to provide a basis for understanding this evaluation. Prior to conducting the evaluation, a baseline experiment showed that people are relatively good at judging coworkers' expertise when given an appropriate context. This finding provides a way to demonstrate the effectiveness of ER by comparing ER's performance to ratings by coworkers. The evaluation, the design, and results are described in detail. The results suggest that the participants agree with the recommendations made by ER, and that ER significantly outperforms other expertise recommender systems when compared using similar metrics.

© All rights reserved McDonald and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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McDonald, David W. and Ackerman, Mark S. (2000): Expertise Recommender: A Flexible Recommendation System and Architecture. In: Kellogg, Wendy A. and Whittaker, Steve (eds.) Proceedings of the 2000 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work 2000, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 231-240.

Locating the expertise necessary to solve difficult problems is a nuanced social and collaborative problem. In organizations, some people assist others in locating expertise by making referrals. People who make referrals fill key organizational roles that have been identified by CSCW and affiliated research. Expertise locating systems are not designed to replace people who fill these key organizational roles. Instead, expertise locating systems attempt to decrease workload and support people who have no other options. Recommendation systems are collaborative software that can be applied to expertise locating. This work describes a general recommendation architecture that is grounded in a field study of expertise locating. Our expertise recommendation system details the work necessary to fit expertise recommendation to a work setting. The architecture and implementation begin to tease apart the technical aspects of providing good recommendations from social and collaborative concerns.

© All rights reserved McDonald and Ackerman and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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McDonald, David W. and Ackerman, Mark S. (1998): Just Talk to Me: A Field Study of Expertise Location. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 315-324.

Everyday, people in organizations must solve their problems to get their work accomplished. To do so, they often must find others with knowledge and information. Systems that assist users with finding such expertise are increasingly interesting to organizations and scientific communities. But, as we begin to design and construct such systems, it is important to determine what we are attempting to augment. Accordingly, we conducted a five month field study of a medium-sized software firm. We found the participants use complex, iterative behaviors to minimize the number of possible expertise sources, while at the same time, provide a high possibility of garnering the necessary expertise. We briefly consider the design implications of the mechanisms identification, selection, and escalation behaviors found during our field study.

© All rights reserved McDonald and Ackerman and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Terveen, Loren, Hill, William C., Amento, Brian, McDonald, David W. and Creter, Josh (1997): Building Task-Specific Interfaces to High Volume Conversational Data. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 226-233.

As people participate in the thousands of global conversations that comprise Usenet news, one thing they do is post their opinions of web resources. Phoaks is a collaborative filtering system that continuously parses, classifies, abstracts and tallies those opinions. About 3,500 users per day consult Phoaks web pages that reflect the results. Phoaks also features a general architecture for building similar collaborative filtering interfaces to conversational data. We report here on the Phoaks resource recommendation interface, the architecture, and the issues and experience that make up its rationale.

© All rights reserved Terveen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Terveen, Loren, Hill, William C., Amento, Brian, McDonald, David W. and Creter, Josh (1997): Phoaks: A System for Sharing Recommendations. In Communications of the ACM, 40 (3) pp. 59-62.

1996
 
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Ackerman, Mark S. and McDonald, David W. (1996): Answer Garden 2: Merging Organizational Memory with Collaborative Help. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 97-105.

This research examines a collaborative solution to a common problem, that of providing help to distributed users. The Answer Garden 2 system provides a second-generation architecture for organizational and community memory applications. After describing the need for Answer Garden 2's functionality, we describe the architecture of the system and two underlying systems, the Cafe ConstructionKit and Collaborative Refinery. We also present detailed descriptions of the collaborative help and collaborative refining facilities in the Answer Garden 2 system.

© All rights reserved Ackerman and and/or ACM Press

 
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Publication statistics

Pub. period:1996-2012
Pub. count:36
Number of co-authors:49



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James A. Landay:5
Sunny Consolvo:5
Mark S. Ackerman:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

David W. McDonald's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Loren Terveen:69
Mark S. Ackerman:67
 
 
 

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