Upcoming Courses

go to course
The Practical Guide to Usability
88% booked. Starts in 7 days
go to course
The Ultimate Guide to Visual Perception and Design
82% booked. Starts in 13 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Basic Books

Web: http://www.basicbooks.com/

No description available of Basic Books.

ADD DESCRIPTION
 
 
 

Examples of published books

Gardner, Howard (1985): The Mind's New Science: A History of the Cognitive Revolution. New York, Basic Books

Papert, Seymour (1980): Mindstorms: Children, Computers and Powerful Ideas. New York, Basic Books

Zuboff, Shoshanna (1988): In the Age of the Smart Machine: The Future of Work and Power. New York, NY, Basic Books

Lakoff, George and Johnson, Mark (1999): Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and Its Challenge to Western Thought. New York, Basic Books

Lakoff, George and Johnson, Mark (1983): Metaphors We Live by. New York, Basic Books

Norman, Donald A. (2004): Emotional Design: Why We Love (Or Hate) Everyday Things. Basic Books

Gardner, Howard (1983): Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York, Basic Books

Gardner, Howard (1991): The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach. New York, Basic Books

Gardner, Howard (1999): Intelligence Reframed: Multiple Intelligences for the 21st Century. New York, Basic Books

Gardner, Howard (1999): The Disciplined Mind: Beyond Facts and Standardized Tests. New York, Basic Books

Gardner, Howard, Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly and Damon, William (2002): Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet. New York, Basic Books

Gardner, Howard (1989): To Open Minds: Chinese clues to the dilemma of contemporary education. New York, Basic Books

Norman, Donald A. (1988): The Psychology of Everyday Things. New York, Basic Books

Norman, Donald A. (2004): Emotional design : why we love (or hate) everyday things. Basic Books

Norman, Donald A. (2007): The Design of Future Things. Basic Books

Donald A. Norman, a popular design consultant to car manufacturers, computer companies, and other industrial and design outfits, has seen the future and is worried. In this long-awaited follow-up to The Design of Everyday Things, he points out what’s going wrong with the wave of products just coming on the market and some that are on drawing boards everywhere-from “smart” cars and homes that seek to anticipate a user’s every need, to the latest automatic navigational systems. Norman builds on this critique to offer a consumer-oriented theory of natural human-machine interaction that can be put into practice by the engineers and industrial designers of tomorrow’s thinking machines. This is a consumer-oriented look at the perils and promise of the smart objects of the future, and a cautionary tale for designers of these objects-many of which are already in use or development.

© All rights reserved Norman and/or Basic Books

Schon, Donald A. (1983): The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think In Action. Basic Books

A leading M.I.T. social scientist and consultant examines five professions—engineering, architecture, management, psychotherapy, and town planning—to show how professionals really go about solving problems.The best professionals, Donald Schön maintains, know more than they can put into words. To meet the challenges of their work, they rely less on formulas learned in graduate school than on the kind of improvisation learned in practice. This unarticulated, largely unexamined process is the subject of Schön’s provocatively original book, an effort to show precisely how ”reflection-in-action” works and how this vital creativity might be fostered in future professionals.

© All rights reserved Schon and/or Basic Books

Lakoff, George and Nunez, Rafael (2001): Where Mathematics Comes From: How the Embodied Mind Brings Mathematics into Being. Basic Books

This book is about mathematical ideas, about what mathematics means-and why. Abstract ideas, for the most part, arise via conceptual metaphor-metaphorical ideas projecting from the way we function in the everyday physical world. Where Mathematics Comes From argues that conceptual metaphor plays a central role in mathematical ideas within the cognitive unconscious-from arithmetic and algebra to sets and logic to infinity in all of its forms.

© All rights reserved Lakoff and Nunez and/or Basic Books

Johnson, Steven A. (1997): Interface Culture. Basic Books

Drawing on his own expertise in the humanities and on the Web, Steven Johnson not only demonstrates how interfaces - those buttons, graphics, and words on the computer screen through which we control information - influence our daily lives, but also tracks their roots back to Victorian novels, early cinema, and even medieval urban planning. The result is a lush cultural and historical tableau in which today’s interfaces take their rightful place in the lineage of artistic innovation. With a distinctively accessible style, Interface Culture brings new intellectual depth to the vital discussion of how technology has transformed society, and is sure to provoke wide debate in both literary and technological circles.

© All rights reserved Johnson and/or Basic Books

Lessig, Lawrence (1999): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace. Basic Books

There’s a common belief that cyberspace cannot be regulated—that it is, in its very essence, immune from the government’s (or anyone else’s) control.Code argues that this belief is wrong. It is not in the nature of cyberspace to be unregulable; cyberspace has no “nature.” It only has code—the software and hardware that make cyberspace what it is. That code can create a place of freedom—as the original architecture of the Net did—or a place of exquisitely oppressive control.If we miss this point, then we will miss how cyberspace is changing. Under the influence of commerce, cyberpsace is becoming a highly regulable space, where our behavior is much more tightly controlled than in real space.But that’s not inevitable either. We can—we must—choose what kind of cyberspace we want and what freedoms we will guarantee. These choices are all about architecture: about what kind of code will govern cyberspace, and who will control it. In this realm, code is the most significant form of law, and it is up to lawyers, policymakers, and especially citizens to decide what values that code embodies.

© All rights reserved Lessig and/or Basic Books

Kelly, Kevin (1995): Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, & the Economic World. Basic Books

Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so complex and autonomous as to be indistinguishable from living things.

© All rights reserved Kelly and/or Basic Books

Kelly, Kevin (1994): Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, & the Economic World. Basic Books

Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so complex and autonomous as to be indistinguishable from living things.

© All rights reserved Kelly and/or Basic Books

Axelrod, Robert M. (2006): The Evolution of Cooperation. New York, Basic Books

The Evolution of Cooperation provides valuable insights into the age-old question of whether unforced cooperation is ever possible. Widely praised and much-discussed, this classic book explores how cooperation can emerge in a world of self-seeking egoists-whether superpowers, businesses, or individuals-when there is no central authority to police their actions. The problem of cooperation is central to many different fields. Robert Axelrod recounts the famous computer tournaments in which the cooperative program Tit for Tat recorded its stunning victories, explains its application to a broad spectrum of subjects, and suggests how readers can both apply cooperative principles to their own lives and teach cooperative principles to others.

© All rights reserved Axelrod and/or Basic Books

Norman, Donald A. (2013): The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition. Basic Books

 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 

User-contributed notes

Give us your opinion! Do you have any comments/additions
that you would like other visitors to see?

 
comment You (your email) say: Sep 30th, 2014
#1
Sep 30
Add a thoughtful commentary or note to this page ! 
 

will be spam-protected
How many?
= e.g. "6"
User ExperienceBy submitting you agree to the Site Terms
 
 
 
 

Changes to this page (publisher)

05 Aug 2008: Modified

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/publishers/basic_books.html