Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2014
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:5



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas M. Kunz:9
Markus Zank:3
Ying-Yin Huang:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Thomas Nescher's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Andreas M. Kunz:71
Ramon Hofer:7
Markus Zank:3
 
 
 

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Thomas Nescher

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Publications by Thomas Nescher (bibliography)

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2014
 
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Nescher, Thomas, Huang, Ying-Yin and Kunz, Andreas M. (2014): Planning Redirection Techniques for Optimal Free Walking Experience Using Model Predictive Control. In: IEEE 9th Symposium on 3D User Interfaces March 29-30, 2014, Ninneapolis, USA. pp. 111-118.

RedirectedWalking (RDW) is a technique that allows exploring immersive virtual environments by real walking in a small physical room. RDW employs so-called redirection techniques (RETs) to manipulate the user’s real world trajectory in such a way that he remains within the boundaries of the physical room. Different RETs were suggested and evaluated in the past. In addition, steering algorithms were proposed that apply a limited set of RETs to redirect a user away from the physical room’s boundaries. Within this paper, a generalized approach to planning and applying RETs is presented. It is capable of dynamically selecting suitable RETs and also controlling parameters like their strengths. The problem of steering a user in a small physical room using RETs is formulated as an optimal control problem. This allows applying an efficient probabilistic planning algorithm to maximize the free walking experience. The proposed algorithm uses a map of the virtual environment to continuously determine the optimal RET that has to be applied next. The suggested algorithm is evaluated within a user study and compared to a state-of-the-art steering algorithm. Results show that for the given virtual environment, it is able to reduce the number of collisions with the room boundaries by 41% and furthermore reduces the amount of applied redirections significantly.

© All rights reserved Nescher et al. and/or IEEE

2013
 
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Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2013): Using Head Tracking Data for Robust Short Term Path Prediction of Human Locomotion. In Transactions on Computational Science, 0 pp. 172-191.

Modern interactive environments like virtual reality simulators or augmented reality systems often require reliable information about a user's future intention in order to increase their immersion and usefulness. For many of such systems, where human locomotion is an essential way of interaction, knowing a user's future walking direction provides relevant information. This paper explains how head tracking data can be used to retrieve a person's intended direction of walking. The goal is to provide a reliable and stable path prediction of human locomotion that holds for a few seconds. Using 6 degrees of freedom head tracking data, the head orientation and the head's movement direction can be derived. Within a user study it is shown that such raw tracking data provides poor prediction results mainly due to noise from gait oscillations. Hence, smoothing lters have to be applied to the data to increase the reliability and robustness of a predictor. Results of the user study show that double exponential smoothing of a person's walking direction data in combination with an initialization using the head orientation provides a reliable short term path predictor with high robustness.

© All rights reserved Nescher and Kunz and/or Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

 
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Zank, Markus, Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2013): Robust Prediction of Auditory Step Feedback for Forward Walking. In: Proceedings of 19th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology October 6-8, 2013, Singapore, Singapore. pp. 119-122.

Virtual reality systems supporting real walking as a navigation interface usually lack auditory step feedback, although this could give additional information to the user e.g. about the ground he is walking on. In order to add matching auditory step feedback to virtual environments, we propose a user-independent, calibration-free and easy to use system that can predict the occurrence time of stepping sounds based on human gait data. Our system is based on the timing of reliably occurring characteristic events in the gait cycle which are detected using foot mounted accelerometers and gyroscopes. This approach not only allows us to detect but to predict the time of an upcoming step sound in real-time. Based on data gathered in an experiment, we compare di erent suitable events that allow a tradeo between the maximum precision of the prediction and the maximum time by which the sound can be predicted.

© All rights reserved Zank et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Zank, Markus, Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2013): Robust Prediction of Auditory Step Feedback for Forward Walking. In: 19th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology October 6-8, 2013, Singapore, Singapore. pp. 119-122.

Virtual reality systems supporting real walking as a navigation interface usually lack auditory step feedback, although this could give additional information to the user e.g. about the ground he is walking on. In order to add matching auditory step feedback to virtual environments, we propose a user-independent, calibration-free and easy to use system that can predict the occurrence time of stepping sounds based on human gait data. Our system is based on the timing of reliably occurring characteristic events in the gait cycle which are detected using foot mounted accelerometers and gyroscopes. This approach not only allows us to detect but to predict the time of an upcoming step sound in real-time. Based on data gathered in an experiment, we compare di_erent suitable events that allow a tradeo_ between the maximum precision of the prediction and the maximum time by which the sound can be predicted.

© All rights reserved Zank et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Zank, Markus, Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2013): Robust Prediction of Auditory Step Feedback for Forward Walking. In: Proceeding of the 19th ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology October 6-8, 2013, Singapore, Singapore. pp. 119-122.

Virtual reality systems supporting real walking as a navigation interface usually lack auditory step feedback, although this could give additional information to the user e.g. about the ground he is walking on. In order to add matching auditory step feedback to virtual environments, we propose a user-independent, calibration-free and easy to use system that can predict the occurrence time of stepping sounds based on human gait data. Our system is based on the timing of reliably occurring characteristic events in the gait cycle which are detected using foot mounted accelerometers and gyroscopes. This approach not only allows us to detect but to predict the time of an upcoming step sound in real-time. Based on data gathered in an experiment, we compare di erent suitable events that allow a tradeo between the maximum precision of the prediction and the maximum time by which the sound can be predicted.

© All rights reserved Zank et al. and/or their publisher

2012
 
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Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2012): Analysis of Short Term Path Prediction of Human Locomotion for Augmented and Virtual Reality Applications. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Cyberworlds CW 2012 September 25-27, 2012, Darmstadt, Germany. pp. 15-22.

When human locomotion is used to interact with virtual or augmented environments, the system's immersion could be improved by providing reliable information about the user's walking intention. Such a prediction can be derived from tracking data to determine the future walking direction. This paper analyses how tracking data relates to navigation decisions from an egocentric view in order to achieve a reliable and stable path prediction. Since tracking data is noisy, a smoothening is required that eliminates oscillations while still recognizing trends in human locomotion. Thus, we analyze different approaches for path prediction, determine relevant setting values, and verify the results by a user study. Results indicate that robust short term prediction of human locomotion is possible but care must be taken when designing such a predictor.

© All rights reserved Nescher and Kunz and/or their publisher

2011
 
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Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2011): An interactive whiteboard for immersive telecollaboration. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 1-10.

In this paper, we present CollaBoard, a collaboration system that gives a higher feeling of presence to the local auditory and to the persons on the remote site. By overlaying the remote life-sized video image atop the shared artifacts on the common whiteboard and by keeping the whiteboard's content editable at both sites, it creates a higher involvement of the remote partners into a collaborative teamwork. All deictic gestures of the remote user are shown in the right context with the shared artifacts on the common whiteboard and thus preserve their meaning. The paper describes the hardware setup, as well as the software implementation and the performed user studies with two identical interconnected systems.

© All rights reserved Nescher and Kunz and/or Springer

2010
 
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Kunz, Andreas M., Nescher, Thomas and Kchler, Martin (2010): CollaBoard: A Novel Interactive Electronic Whiteboard for Remote Collaboration with People on Content. In: 2010 International Conference on Cyberworlds - Cyberworldds 2010 October 20-22, 2010, Singapur, Singapore. .

In this paper, we present a device called _CollaBoard_. It was developed in the context of ongoing CSCW research efforts in developing groupware that mediates remote collaboration processes. CollaBoard combines video- and data-conferencing by overlaying a life-sized video showing the entire upper body of remote people in front of the displayed shared content. By doing so, CollaBoard shows pose, gaze, and gestures of remote partners, preserves the meaning of users_ deictic gestures when pointing at displayed shared artifacts, and keeps shared artifacts editable at both conference sites. For this, a new whiteboard software is also introduced, which allows a real-time synchronization of the generated artifacts. Finally, the functionality of two interconnected CollaBoard prototypes was verified in a usability assessment.

© All rights reserved Kunz et al. and/or IEEE Computer Society

2009
 
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Hofer, Ramon, Nescher, Thomas and Kunz, Andreas M. (2009): QualiTrack: Highspeed TUI Tracking for Tabletop Applications. In: Gross, T. (ed.) Proceedings of Interact 2009 August 24-28, 2009, Uppsala. pp. 332-335.

In this paper, we present a new technology to track multiple active Tangible User Interfaces (TUI) on a projection table. We use a commercial high speed infrared tracking camera with modified firmware. With a special tracking method, we reach update rates of up to 250 Hz with low latencies. At this tracking rate, we are able to track the position, state and the orientation of more than 10 active TUIs on the table. For this, we use specified bit codes which are transmitted by the devices. We developed dedicated hardware (SyncUnit) and software to keep the devices and the high speed camera synchronized. The system of camera, SyncUnit, and devices is fully hardware controlled and delivers event coded tracking data for further usage in interactive applications.

© All rights reserved Hofer et al. and/or Springer Lecture Notes of Computer Science

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/thomas_nescher.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2014
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:5



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas M. Kunz:9
Markus Zank:3
Ying-Yin Huang:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Thomas Nescher's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Andreas M. Kunz:71
Ramon Hofer:7
Markus Zank:3
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

Affordances: Designing Intuitive User Interfaces

89% booked. Starts in 6 days
 
 
 

User Experience: The Beginner's Guide

84% booked. Starts in 11 days
 
 
 
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 
 
 
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