Publication statistics

Pub. period:1977-2009
Pub. count:59
Number of co-authors:81



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas Paepcke:14
Meredith Ringel Morris:6
Fernando Flores:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Terry Winograd's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John M. Carroll:209
James A. Landay:91
Bonnie A. Nardi:67
 
 
 
Jul 13

A general principle for all user interface design is to go through all of your design elements and remove them one at a time. If the design works as well without a certain design element, kill it.

-- Jakob Nielsen, Designing Web Usability, p. 22.

 
 

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Terry Winograd

Picture of Terry Winograd.
Personal Homepage:
hci.stanford.edu/winograd/cv.html

Terry Allen Winograd (born February 24, 1946) is an American professor of computer science at Stanford University, and co-director of the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group.[1] He is known within the philosophy of mind and artificial intelligence fields for his work on natural language using the SHRDLU program.

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Publications by Terry Winograd (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Akers, David, Simpson, Matthew, Jeffries, Robin and Winograd, Terry (2009): Undo and erase events as indicators of usability problems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 659-668.

One approach to reducing the costs of usability testing is to facilitate the automatic detection of critical incidents: serious breakdowns in interaction that stand out during software use. This research evaluates the use of undo and erase events as indicators of critical incidents in Google SketchUp (a 3D-modeling application), measuring an indicator's usefulness by the numbers and types of usability problems discovered. We compared problems identified using undo and erase events to problems identified using the user-reported critical incident technique [Hartson and Castillo 1998]. In a within-subjects experiment with 35 participants, undo and erase episodes together revealed over 90% of the problems rated as severe, several of which would not have been discovered by self-report alone. Moreover, problems found by all three methods were rated as significantly more severe than those identified by only a subset of methods. These results suggest that undo and erase events will serve as useful complements to user-reported critical incidents for low cost usability evaluation of creation-oriented applications like SketchUp.

© All rights reserved Akers et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Kumar, Manu, Klingner, Jeff, Puranik, Rohan, Winograd, Terry and Paepcke, Andreas (2008): Improving the accuracy of gaze input for interaction. In: Räihä, Kari-Jouko and Duchowski, Andrew T. (eds.) ETRA 2008 - Proceedings of the Eye Tracking Research and Application Symposium March 26-28, 2008, Savannah, Georgia, USA. pp. 65-68.

 
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Winograd, Terry (2008): Design education for business and engineering management students: a new approach. In Interactions, 15 (1) pp. 44-45.

 
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Bernstein, Michael S., Shrager, Jeff and Winograd, Terry (2008): Taskposé: exploring fluid boundaries in an associative window visualization. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 231-234.

2007
 
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Kumar, Manu, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2007): EyePoint: practical pointing and selection using gaze and keyboard. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 421-430.

We present a practical technique for pointing and selection using a combination of eye gaze and keyboard triggers. EyePoint uses a two-step progressive refinement process fluidly stitched together in a look-press-look-release action, which makes it possible to compensate for the accuracy limitations of the current state-of-the-art eye gaze trackers. While research in gaze-based pointing has traditionally focused on disabled users, EyePoint makes gaze-based pointing effective and simple enough for even able-bodied users to use for their everyday computing tasks. As the cost of eye gaze tracking devices decreases, it will become possible for such gaze-based techniques to be used as a viable alternative for users who choose not to use a mouse depending on their abilities, tasks and preferences.

© All rights reserved Kumar et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Phan, Doantam, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2007): Progressive multiples for communication-minded visualization. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Graphics Interface 2007. pp. 225-232.

This paper describes a communication-minded visualization called progressive multiples that supports both the forensic analysis and presentation of multidimensional event data. We combine ideas from progressive disclosure, which reveals data to the user on demand, and small multiples [21], which allows users to compare many images at once. Sets of events are visualized as timelines. Events are placed in temporal order on the x-axis, and a scalar dimension of the data is mapped to the y-axis. To support forensic analysis, users can pivot from an event in an existing timeline to create a new timeline of related events. The timelines serve as an exploration history, which has two benefits. First, this exploration history allows users to backtrack and explore multiple paths. Second, once a user has concluded an analysis, these timelines serve as the raw visual material for composing a story about the analysis. A narrative that conveys the analytical result can be created for a third party by copying and reordering timelines from the history. Our work is motivated by working with network security administrators and researchers in political communication. We describe a prototype that we are deploying with administrators and the results of a user study where we applied our technique to the visualization of a simulated epidemic.

© All rights reserved Phan et al. and/or Canadian Information Processing Society

 
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Kumar, Manu, Garfinkel, Tal, Boneh, Dan and Winograd, Terry (2007): Reducing shoulder-surfing by using gaze-based password entry. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2007. pp. 13-19.

Shoulder-surfing -- using direct observation techniques, such as looking over someone's shoulder, to get passwords, PINs and other sensitive personal information -- is a problem that has been difficult to overcome. When a user enters information using a keyboard, mouse, touch screen or any traditional input device, a malicious observer may be able to acquire the user's password credentials. We present EyePassword, a system that mitigates the issues of shoulder surfing via a novel approach to user input. With EyePassword, a user enters sensitive input (password, PIN, etc.) by selecting from an on-screen keyboard using only the orientation of their pupils (i.e. the position of their gaze on screen), making eavesdropping by a malicious observer largely impractical. We present a number of design choices and discuss their effect on usability and security. We conducted user studies to evaluate the speed, accuracy and user acceptance of our approach. Our results demonstrate that gaze-based password entry requires marginal additional time over using a keyboard, error rates are similar to those of using a keyboard and subjects preferred the gaze-based password entry approach over traditional methods.

© All rights reserved Kumar et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Maynes-Aminzade, Dan, Winograd, Terry and Igarashi, Takeo (2007): Eyepatch: prototyping camera-based interaction through examples. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 7-10, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 33-42.

Cameras are a useful source of input for many interactive applications, but computer vision programming is difficult and requires specialized knowledge that is out of reach for many HCI practitioners. In an effort to learn what makes a useful computer vision design tool, we created Eyepatch, a tool for designing camera-based interactions, and evaluated the Eyepatch prototype through deployment to students in an HCI course. This paper describes the lessons we learned about making computer vision more accessible, while retaining enough power and flexibility to be useful in a wide variety of interaction scenarios.

© All rights reserved Maynes-Aminzade et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kumar, Manu and Winograd, Terry (2007): Gaze-enhanced scrolling techniques. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 7-10, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 213-216.

Scrolling is an essential part of our everyday computing experience. Contemporary scrolling techniques rely on the explicit initiation of scrolling by the user. The act of scrolling is tightly coupled with the user's ability to absorb information via the visual channel. The use of eye gaze information is therefore a natural choice for enhancing scrolling techniques. We present several gaze-enhanced scrolling techniques for manual and automatic scrolling which use gaze information as a primary input or as an augmented input. We also introduce the use off-screen gaze-actuated buttons for document navigation and control.

© All rights reserved Kumar and Winograd and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Huang, Anqi, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2006): Cooperative gestures: multi-user gestural interactions for co-located groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1201-1210.

Multi-user, touch-sensing input devices create opportunities for the use of cooperative gestures -- multi-user gestural interactions for single display groupware. Cooperative gestures are interactions where the system interprets the gestures of more than one user as contributing to a single, combined command. Cooperative gestures can be used to enhance users' sense of teamwork, increase awareness of important system events, facilitate reachability and access control on large, shared displays, or add a unique touch to an entertainment-oriented activity. This paper discusses motivating scenarios for the use of cooperative gesturing and describes some initial experiences with CollabDraw, a system for collaborative art and photo manipulation. We identify design issues relevant to cooperative gesturing interfaces, and present a preliminary design framework. We conclude by identifying directions for future research on cooperative gesturing interaction techniques.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry and Stamberger, Jeannie (2006): TeamTag: exploring centralized versus replicated controls for co-located tabletop groupware. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1273-1282.

We explore how the placement of control widgets (such as menus) affects collaboration and usability for co-located tabletop groupware applications. We evaluated two design alternatives: a centralized set of controls shared by all users, and separate per-user controls replicated around the borders of the shared tabletop. We conducted this evaluation in the context of TeamTag, a system for collective annotation of digital photos. Our comparison of the two design alternatives found that users preferred replicated over shared controls. We discuss the cause of this preference, and also present data on the impact of these interface design variants on collaboration, as well as the role that orientation, co-touching, and the use of different regions of the table played in shaping users' behavior and preferences.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Piper, Anne Marie, O'Brien, Eileen, Morris, Meredith Ringel and Winograd, Terry (2006): SIDES: a cooperative tabletop computer game for social skills development. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 1-10.

This paper presents a design case study of SIDES: Shared Interfaces to Develop Effective Social Skills. SIDES is a tool designed to help adolescents with Asperger's Syndrome practice effective group work skills using a four-player cooperative computer game that runs on tabletop technology. We present the design process and evaluation of SIDES conducted over six months with a middle school social group therapy class. Our findings indicate that cooperative tabletop computer games are a motivating and supportive tool for facilitating effective group work among our target population and reveal several design lessons to inform the development of similar systems.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2006): TeamSearch: Comparing Techniques for Co-Present Collaborative Search of Digital Media. In: First IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2006 5-7 January, 2006, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 97-104.

 
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Winograd, Terry (2006): Designing a new foundation for design. In Communications of the ACM, 49 (5) pp. 71-74.

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Cassanego, Anthony, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry, Piper, Anne Marie and Huang, Anqi (2006): Mediating Group Dynamics through Tabletop Interface Design. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (5) pp. 65-73.

2005
 
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Winograd, Terry and Klemmer, Scott R. (2005): HCI at Stanford University. In Interactions, 12 (5) pp. 30-31.

 
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Phan, Doantam, Xiao, Ling, Yeh, Ron B., Hanrahan, Pat and Winograd, Terry (2005): Flow Map Layout. In: InfoVis 2005 - IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 23-25 October, 2005, Minneapolis, MN, USA. p. 29.

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Streitz, Norbert A. and Winograd, Terry (2005): Building disappearing computers. In Communications of the ACM, 48 (3) pp. 42-48.

2004
 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Morris, Dan and Winograd, Terry (2004): Individual audio channels with single display groupware: effects on communication and task strategy. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 242-251.

We introduce a system that allows four users to each receive sound from a private audio channel while using a shared tabletop display. In order to explore how private audio channels affect a collaborative work environment, we conducted a user study with this system. The results reveal differences in work strategies when groups are presented with individual versus public audio, and suggest that the use of private audio does not impede group communication and may positively impact group dynamics. We discuss the findings, as well as their implications for the design of future audio-based "single display privacyware" systems.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ju, Wendy, Ionescu, Arna, Neeley, Lawrence and Winograd, Terry (2004): Where the wild things work: capturing shared physical design workspaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 533-541.

We have built and tested WorkspaceNavigator, which supports knowledge capture and reuse for teams engaged in unstructured, dispersed, and prolonged collaborative design activity in a dedicated physical workspace. It provides a coherent unified interface for post-facto retrieval of multiple streams of data from the work environment, including overview snapshots of the workspace, screenshots of in-space computers, whiteboard images, and digital photos of physical objects. This paper describes the design of WorkspaceNavigator and identifies key considerations for knowledge capture tools for design workspaces, which differ from those of more structured meeting or classroom environments. Iterative field tests in workspace environments for student teams in two graduate Mechanical Engineering design courses helped to identify features that augment the work of both course participants and design researchers.

© All rights reserved Ju et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Johanson, Brad, Winograd, Terry and Fox, Armando (2003): Interactive Workspaces. In IEEE Computer, 36 (4) pp. 99-101.

 
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Kaptelinin, Victor, Nardi, Bonnie A., Bødker, Susanne, Carroll, John M., Hollan, James D., Hutchins, Edwin and Winograd, Terry (2003): Post-cognitivist HCI: second-wave theories. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Extended abstracts of the 2003 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI 2003 April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 692-693.

 Cited in the following chapter:

Activity Theory: [/encyclopedia/activity_theory.html]


 
2002
 
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Johanson, Brad, Hutchins, Greg, Winograd, Terry and Stone, Maureen C. (2002): PointRight: experience with flexible input redirection in interactive workspaces. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 227-234.

We describe the design of and experience with PointRight, a peer-to-peer pointer and keyboard redirection system that operates in multi-machine, multi-user environments. PointRight employs a geometric model for redirecting input across screens driven by multiple independent machines and operating systems. It was created for interactive workspaces that include large, shared displays and individual laptops, but is a general tool that supports many different configurations and modes of use. Although previous systems have provided for re-routing pointer and keyboard control, in this paper we present a more general and flexible system, along with an analysis of the types of re-binding that must be handled by any pointer redirection system This paper describes the system, the ways in which it has been used, and the lessons that have been learned from its use over the last two years.

© All rights reserved Johanson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Buyukkokten, Orkut, Kaljuvee, Oliver, Garcia-Molina, Hector, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2002): Efficient web browsing on handheld devices using page and form summarization. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 20 (1) pp. 82-115.

We present a design and implementation for displaying and manipulating HTML pages on small handheld devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), or cellular phones. We introduce methods for summarizing parts of Web pages and HTML forms. Each Web page is broken into text units that can each be hidden, partially displayed, made fully visible, or summarized. A variety of methods are introduced that summarize the text units. In addition, HTML forms are also summarized by displaying just the text labels that prompt the use for input. We tested the relative performance of the summarization methods by asking human subjects to accomplish single-page information search tasks. We found that the combination of keywords and single-sentence summaries provides significant improvements in access times and number of required pen actions, as compared to other schemes. Our experiments also show that our algorithms can identify the appropriate labels for forms in 95% of the cases, allowing effective form support for small screens.

© All rights reserved Buyukkokten et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

User Interface Design Adaptation: [/encyclopedia/user_interface_design_adaptation.html]


 
 
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Graham, Adrian, Garcia-Molina, Hector, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2002): Time as essence for photo browsing through personal digital libraries. In: JCDL02: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2002. pp. 326-335.

We developed two photo browsers for collections with thousands of time-stamped digital images. Modern digital cameras record photo shoot times, and semantically related photos tend to occur in bursts. Our browsers exploit the timing information to structure the collections and to automatically generate meaningful summaries. The browsers differ in how users navigate and view the structured collections. We conducted user studies to compare the two browsers and an un-summarized image browser. Our results show that exploiting the time dimension and appropriately summarizing collections can lead to significant improvements. For example, for one task category, one of our browsers enabled a 33% improvement in speed of finding given images compared to the commercial browser. Similarly, users were able to complete 29% more tasks when using this same browser.

© All rights reserved Graham et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
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Winograd, Terry (2001): Architectures for Context. In Human-Computer Interaction, 16 (2) pp. 401-419.

The development of context-aware applications will require tools that are based on clearly defined models of context and system software architecture. This essay introduces models for each of these, examines the tradeoffs among the different alternatives, and describes a blackboard-based context architecture that is being used in the construction of interactive workspaces.

© All rights reserved Winograd and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Guimbretiere, Francois, Stone, Maureen C. and Winograd, Terry (2001): Fluid interaction with high-resolution wall-size displays. In: Marks, Joe and Mynatt, Elizabeth D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 14th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 11 - 14, 2001, Orlando, Florida. pp. 21-30.

This paper describes new interaction techniques for direct pen-based interaction on the Interactive Mural, a large (6'x3.5') high resolution (64 dpi) display. They have been tested in a digital brainstorming tool that has been used by groups of professional product designers. Our "interactive wall" metaphor for interaction has been guided by several goals: to support both free-hand sketching and high-resolution materials, such as images, 3D models and GUI application windows; to present a visual appearance that does not clutter the content with control devices; and to support fluid interaction, which minimizes the amount of attention demanded and interruption due to the mechanics of the interface. We have adapted and extended techniques that were developed for electronic whiteboards and generalized the use of the FlowMenu to execute a wide variety of actions in a single pen stroke, While these techniques were designed for a brainstorming tool, they are very general and can be used in a wide variety of application domains using interactive surfaces.

© All rights reserved Guimbretiere et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ponnekanti, Shankar, Lee, Brian, Fox, Armando, Hanrahan, Pat and Winograd, Terry (2001): ICrafter: A Service Framework for Ubiquitous Computing Environments. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 56-75.

2000
 
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Winograd, Terry (2000): Design brief: Stanford University. In Interactions, 7 (2) pp. 66-69.

 
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Buyukkokten, Orkut, Garcia-Molina, Hector, Paepcke, Andreas and Winograd, Terry (2000): Power Browser: Efficient Web Browsing for PDAs. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 430-437.

We have designed and implemented new Web browsing facilities to support effective navigation on Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) with limited capabilities: low bandwidth, small display, and slow CPU. The implementation supports wireless browsing from 3Corn's Palm Pilot. An HTTP proxy fetches web pages on the client's behalf and dynamically generates summary views to be transmitted to the client. These summaries represent both the link structure and contents of a set of web pages, using information about link importance. We discuss the architecture, user interface facilities, and the results of comparative performance evaluations. We measured a 45% gain in browsing speed, and a 42% reduction in required pen movements.

© All rights reserved Buyukkokten et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Guimbretiere, Francois and Winograd, Terry (2000): FlowMenu: Combining Command, Text, and Data Entry. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 213-216.

 
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Oviatt, Sharon, Cohen, Philip R., Wu, Lizhong, Duncan, Lisbeth, Suhm, Bernhard, Bers, Josh, Holzman, Thomas C., Winograd, Terry, Landay, James A., Larson, Jim and Ferro, David (2000): Designing the User Interface for Multimodal Speech and Pen-Based Gesture Applications: State-of-the-Art Systems and Future Research Directions. In Human-Computer Interaction, 15 (4) pp. 263-322.

The growing interest in multimodal interface design is inspired in large part by the goals of supporting more transparent, flexible, efficient, and powerfully expressive means of human-computer interaction than in the past. Multimodal interfaces are expected to support a wider range of diverse applications, be usable by a broader spectrum of the average population, and function more reliably under realistic and challenging usage conditions. In this article, we summarize the emerging architectural approaches for interpreting speech and pen-based gestural input in a robust manner-including early and late fusion approaches, and the new hybrid symbolic-statistical approach. We also describe a diverse collection of state-of-the-art multimodal systems that process users' spoken and gestural input. These applications range from map-based and virtual reality systems for engaging in simulations and training, to field medic systems for mobile use in noisy environments, to web-based transactions and standard text-editing applications that will reshape daily computing and have a significant commercial impact. To realize successful multimodal systems of the future, many key research challenges remain to be addressed. Among these challenges are the development of cognitive theories to guide multimodal system design, and the development of effective natural language processing, dialogue processing, and error-handling techniques. In addition, new multimodal systems will be needed that can function more robustly and adaptively, and with support for collaborative multiperson use. Before this new class of systems can proliferate, toolkits also will be needed to promote software development for both simulated and functioning systems.

© All rights reserved Oviatt et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

1998
 
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Baldonado, Michelle Q. Wang and Winograd, Terry (1998): Hi-Cites: Dynamically Created Citations with Active Highlighting. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Joëlle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 408-415.

The original SenseMaker interface for information exploration [2] used tables to present heterogeneous document descriptions. In contrast, printed bibliographies and World Wide Web (WWW) search engines use formatted citations to convey this information. In this paper, we discuss hi-cites, a new interface construct developed for SenseMaker that combines the benefits of tables (which encourage the comparison of descriptions) and citations (which facilitate browsing). Hi-cites are dynamically created citations with active highlighting. They are useful in environments where heterogeneous structured descriptions must be browsed and compared with ease. Examples beyond digital libraries include product catalogs, classified advertisements, and WWW search engines. We have performed an evaluation of hi-cites, tables, and citations for tasks involving single attribute comparisons in the digital-library domain. This evaluation supports our claim that hi-cites are valuable for both comparison and skimming tasks in this environment.

© All rights reserved Baldonado and Winograd and/or ACM Press

 
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Takano, Hajime and Winograd, Terry (1998): Dynamic Bookmarks for the WWW: Managing Personal Navigation Space by Analysis of Link Structure and User Behavior. In: Hypertext 98 - Proceedings of the Ninth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia June 20-24, 1998, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. pp. 297-298.

This paper describes a management tool to support revisiting WWW pages, which we call "WWW Dynamic Bookmark (WDB)." WDB watches and archives a user's navigation behavior, analyses the archive, and shows analyzed results as clues for revisiting URLs. We have integrated link analysis and user behavior analysis to evaluate WWW page importance. WDB presents a list of sites that a user has visited, in importance order, via a landmark list in each site, and showing relationships among sites. Experimental implementation shows that importance calculation and structure displays help users to pick up useful URLs.

© All rights reserved Takano and Winograd and/or ACM Press

 
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Baldonado, Michelle, Katz, Seth, Paepcke, Andreas, Chang, Chen-Chuan K., Garcia-Molina, Hector and Winograd, Terry (1998): An Extensible Constructor Tool for the Rapid, Interactive Design of Query Synthesizers. In: DL98: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1998. pp. 19-28.

We describe an extensible constructor tool that helps information experts (e.g., librarians) create specialized query synthesizers for heterogeneous digital-library environments. A query synthesizer produces a graphical user interface in which a digital-library patron can specify a high-level, fielded, multi-source query. Furthermore, a query synthesizer interacts with a query translator and an attribute translator to transform high-level queries into sets of source-specific queries. In this paper, we discuss how our tool for constructing synthesizers can facilitate the discovery of available attributes (e.g., 'title'), the collation of schemas from different sources, the selection of input widgets for a synthesizer (e.g., a drop-down list widget to support input of controlled vocabulary), and other design aspects. We also describe the user interface of our prototype constructor, which is implemented based on the Stanford InfoBus and metadata architecture.

© All rights reserved Baldonado et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Paepcke, Andreas, Chang, Kevin Chen-Chuan, Garcia-Molina, Hector and Winograd, Terry (1998): Interoperability for Digital Libraries Worldwide. In Communications of the ACM, 41 (4) pp. 33-43.

1997
 
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Baldonado, Michelle Q. Wang and Winograd, Terry (1997): SenseMaker: An Information-Exploration Interface Supporting the Contextual Evolution of a User's Interests. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 11-18.

We describe the design, implementation, and pilot study for SenseMaker, an interface for information exploration across heterogeneous sources. We propose supporting the context-driven evolution of a user's interests via: (1) an approximation of the current information context as the current collection of accumulated information references, and (2) a unified set of user-centered actions for examining the current context and for progressing from one context to the next. SenseMaker users examine their current context by experimenting iteratively with different organizing dimensions and levels of granularity for the current collection's display. They progress from one context to another by building upon, taking away from, or replacing the current collection. They can also return to a previous information context and continue exploring from there.

© All rights reserved Baldonado and Winograd and/or ACM Press

 
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Cousins, Steve, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry, Bier, Eric A. and Pier, Ken (1997): The Digital Library Integrated Task Environment (DLITE). In: DL97: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1997. pp. 142-151.

We describe a case study in the design of a user interface to a digital library. Our design stems from a vision of a library as a channel to the vast array of digital information and document services that are becoming available. Based on published studies of library use and on scenarios, we developed a metaphor called workcenters, which are customized for users' tasks. Due to our scenarios and to prior work in the CHI community, we chose a direct-manipulation realization of the metaphor. Our system, called DLITE, is designed to make it easy for users to interact with many different services while focusing on a task. Users have reacted favorably to the interface design in pilot testing. We conclude by describing our approaches to this problem.

© All rights reserved Cousins et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Paepcke, Andreas, Cousins, Steve B., Garcia-Molina, Hector, Hassan, Scott W., Ketchpel, Steven P., Röscheisen, Martin and Winograd, Terry (1996): Using Distributed Objects for Digital Library Interoperability. In IEEE Computer, 29 (5) pp. 61-68.

 
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Winograd, Terry (1996): Bringing Design to Software. ACM Press

This book aims to illuminate and stimulate the discipline of software design. Collecting insights and experience from experts in diverse fields, it addresses the growing demand that the software industry produce software that really works-software that fits people and situations far better than the examples we see today. With Terry Winograd's introductory framework to guide readers through thoughtful essays, perceptive interviews, and instructive profiles of successful projects and programs, the book explores the issues and concerns that most directly influence the functionality, usability, and significance of software. Contributors include some of the most prominent names in the computing and design fields. Programming Languages Survey/Compilers

© All rights reserved Winograd and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

Interaction Design - brief intro: [/encyclopedia/interaction_design.html]

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]

Semiotics: [/encyclopedia/semiotics_and_human-computer_interaction.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
1995
 
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Winograd, Terry (1995): Digital vs. Libraries: Bridging the Two Cultures. In: Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 1995. p. 2.

 
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Winograd, Terry and Flores, Fernando (1995): Understanding Computers and Cognition: A New Foundation for Design. Addison-Wesley Publishing

 
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Winograd, Terry (1995): From Programming Environments to Environments for Design. In Communications of the ACM, 38 (6) pp. 65-74.

1994
 
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Winograd, Terry (1994): Designing a Language for Interactions. In Interactions, 1 (2) pp. 7-9.

Being a university teacher in the area of human-computer interaction can be both exciting and frustrating. There is a problem in trying to gather together appropriate materials in a field not yet mature enough to have produced a tradition of "classics."

© All rights reserved Winograd and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Winograd, Terry (1994): Categories, disciplines, and social coordination. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 2 (3) pp. 191-197.

Lucy Suchman's paper, "Do categories have politics," challenges the validity of speech act theory as a basis for computer systems for workflow support. Suchman fears that the explicitiness of the theory leads to undue discipline when it is applied in practice. Her fear is grounded in a misunderstanding of what it means to use such a theory, and this paper clarifies the difference between formal comprehensive models of behavior and formal structures used in communication and recording, Explicit speech act theory, like explicit accounting procedures, enforces a kind of uniformity that is necessary in any communication situation where ambiguity and vagueness cannot be routinely resolved through direct personal contact and knowledge. The practicalities of large geographically distributed organizations makes the appropriate use of shared structuring a precondition for effective cooperation.

© All rights reserved Winograd and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

1993
 
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Winograd, Terry (1993): From Virtual Reality to Real Virtualities: Designing the Worlds in which We Live. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. .

 
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Winograd, Terry (1993): What is Software Interaction Design?. In: Cook, Curtis, Scholtz, Jean and Spohrer, James C. (eds.) Empirical Studies of Programmers - Fifth Workshop December 3-15, 1993, 1993, Palo Alto, California. .

 
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Medina-Mora, Raul, Winograd, Terry, Flores, Rodrigo and Flores, Fernando (1993): The Action Workflow Approach to Workflow Management Technology. In The Information Society, 9 (4) .

1992
 
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Adler, P. and Winograd, Terry (eds.) (1992): Usability: Turning technologies into tools. New York, Oxford University Press

 
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Medina-Mora, Raul, Winograd, Terry, Flores, Rodrigo and Flores, Fernando (1992): The Action Workflow Approach to Workflow Management Technology. In: Proceedings of the 1992 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work November 01 - 04, 1992, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 281-288.

This paper describes ActionWorkflow approach to workflow management technology: a design methodology and associated computer software for the support of work in organizations. The approach is based on theories of communicative activity as language/action and has been developed in a series of systems for coordination among users of networked computers. This paper describes the approach, gives an example of its application, and shows the architecture of a workflow management system based on it.

© All rights reserved Medina-Mora et al. and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Winograd, Terry (1990): What Can We Teach about Human-Computer Interaction. In: Carrasco, Jane and Whiteside, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 90 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference 1990, Seattle, Washington,USA. pp. 443-449.

This paper is the closing address for CHI'90. It addresses the problem of educating computer professionals in the area of human-computer interaction, arguing that standard approaches within computer science need to be augmented and that new models of education can aid us in producing students with broad competence in the design of computer systems for human use.

© All rights reserved Winograd and/or ACM Press

1988
 
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Bikson, T. K., Bair, James H., Barry, Richard E., Grantham, Charles E. and Winograd, Terry (1988): Communication, Coordination, and Group Performance. In: Greif, Irene (ed.) Proceedings of the 1988 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work September 26 - 28, 1988, Portland, Oregon, United States. pp. 189-190.

 
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Winograd, Terry (1988): The Language/Action Perspective. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 6 (2) pp. 83-86.

 
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Flores, Fernando, Graves, Michael, Hartfield, Brad and Winograd, Terry (1988): Computer Systems and the Design of Organizational Interaction. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 6 (2) pp. 153-172.

The goal of this paper is to relate theory to invention and application in the design of systems for organizational communication and management. We propose and illustrate a theory of design, technology, and action that we believe has been missing in the mainstream of work on office systems. At the center of our thinking is a theory of language as social action, which differs from the generally taken-for-granted understandings of what goes on in an organization. This approach has been presented elsewhere, and our aim here is to examine its practical implications and assess its effectiveness in the design of The Coordinator, a workgroup productivity system that is in widespread commercial use on personal computers.

© All rights reserved Flores et al. and/or ACM Press

1987
 
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Winograd, Terry and Flores, Fernando (1987): Understanding Computers and Cognition: A New Foundation for Design. Reading MA, Addison-Wesley Publishing

 Cited in the following chapters:

Breakdowns: [/encyclopedia/breakdowns.html]

Participatory Design: [Not yet published]

Human factors: [/encyclopedia/human_factors_definition.html]

Cognitive ergonomics: [/encyclopedia/cognitive_ergonomics.html]


 
 
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Winograd, Terry (1987): A Language/Action Perspective on the Design of Cooperative Work. In Human-Computer Interaction, 3 (1) pp. 3-30.

In creating computer-based systems, we work within a perspective that shapes the design questions that will be asked and the kinds of solutions that are sought. This article introduces a perspective based on language as action, and explores its consequences for system design. We describe a communication tool called The Coordinator, which was designed from a language/action perspective; and we suggest how further aspects of coordinated work might be addressed in a similar style. The language/action perspective is illustrated with an example based on studies of nursing work in a hospital ward and contrasted to other currently prominent perspectives.

© All rights reserved Winograd and/or Taylor and Francis

1986
 
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Winograd, Terry and Flores, Fernando (1986): Understanding Computers and Cognition. Norwood, NJ, Intellect

 Cited in the following chapters:

Philosophy of Interaction: [/encyclopedia/philosophy_of_interaction.html]

Activity Theory: [/encyclopedia/activity_theory.html]

Semiotics: [/encyclopedia/semiotics_and_human-computer_interaction.html]


 
1979
 
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Winograd, Terry (1979): Beyond Programming Languages. In Communications of the ACM, 22 (7) pp. 391-401.

1977
 
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Bobrow, Daniel G. and Winograd, Terry (1977): On Overview of KRL, a Knowledge Representation Language. In Cognitive Science, 1 (1) pp. 3-46.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/terry_winograd.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1977-2009
Pub. count:59
Number of co-authors:81



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas Paepcke:14
Meredith Ringel Morris:6
Fernando Flores:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Terry Winograd's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John M. Carroll:209
James A. Landay:91
Bonnie A. Nardi:67
 
 
 
Jul 13

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