Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2013
Pub. count:120
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Eddy Boeve:3
Lon Barfield:3
Jay Blickstein:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steven Pemberton's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mary Czerwinski:80
Mark A. Neerincx:22
Lon Barfield:22
 
 
 
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Steven Pemberton

Picture of Steven Pemberton.
Has also published under the name of:
"S. Pemberton"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.cwi.nl/~steven/

Current place of employment:
CWI

Steven Pemberton is a senior researcher at CWI, the Dutch national research institute for mathematics and computer science in Amsterdam. His research focuses on the changes that need to be made to system architecture to make the resulting system more human-oriented.

In the 80's he co-designed a programming language, ABC, designing it using HCI design principles. ABC became the basis for the Python programming language.

In the late 80's he built a system with his group, Views, that would now be called a browser. It had extensible markup, stylesheets, vector graphics, client-side scripting, everything you would recognise as the web now (though it didn't run over TCP/IP).

In 1993 he wrote a white paper with Jakob Nielsen, and Scooter Morris for ACM/SIGCHI on visions for electronic publishing, where they recommended using the web.

In 1994 he organised two workshops at the first web conference at CERN (one on electronic publishing, one on client-side computation).

In 1995 he designed and built an early online journal, the SIGCHI Bulletin. He chaired the European World Wide Web Working Group W4G, and then got involved with the fledgling World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

As a consequence he became involved with CSS and HTML, and chaired the HTML Working Group for a decade, and still chairs the Forms working group. He is co-author of many W3C recommendations, including HTML4, CSS, XHTML, XForms, XML Events, and RDFa.

He has also been involved with HCI as the chair of CHI '97, a past editor of the SIGCHI Bulletin, and for ten years a member of the executive committee of SIGCHI. He was editor-in-chief of ACM/interactions for the best part of a decade.

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Publications by Steven Pemberton (bibliography)

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2013
 
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Pemberton, Steven (2013): The Computer as Extended Phenotype. Aarhus, Denmark, The Interaction Design Foundation. In Press

Pemberton, Steven (2013): The Computer as Extended Phenotype. Aarhus, Denmark, The Interaction Design Foundation. In Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2013): Invisible XML. In: Proceedings of Balisage The Markup Conference August 6-9, 2013, Montréal, Canada.

What if you could see everything as XML? XML has many strengths for data exchange, strengths both inherent in the nature of XML markup and strengths that derive from the ubiquity of tools that can process XML. For authoring, however, other forms are preferred: no one writes CSS or Javascript in XML. It does not follow, however, that there is no value in representing such information in XML. Invisible XML is a method for treating non-XML documents as if they were XML, enabling authors to write in a format they prefer while providing XML for processes that are more effective with XML content. There is really no reason why XML cannot be more ubiquitous than it is.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or his/her publisher

2005
 
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Pemberton, Steven (2005): The Future of Web Interfaces. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 4-5.

The Web took the world by storm, and as a result developed rapidly in many directions. However it still exhibits many aspects of its early development, such as its visual and computer-screen orientation. But the Web is still developing rapidly: there are now more browsers on mobile telephones than on desktops, and there is a vast diversity in types of devices, types and orientations of screens, and sizes (in number of pixels), and resolutions (in dpi) of screens. Dealing with this diversity is impossible to address just by keeping a list of all the possible devices, or even a list of the most-used ones, and producing different sites for them, since the complexity would be unmanageable, and because once sites started turning away browsers and devices they didn't know, the browser makers responded by disguising themselves to such sites as other browsers. On top of this diversity there is also the diversity required for accessibility. Although providing access for the visually impaired is an important reason for accessibility, we are all more or less visually impaired at one time or another. When displaying an application on a projector screen at a conference or meeting, the whole audience will typically be visually impaired in comparison to someone sitting behind a computer screen. The existence of separate socalled "Ten-foot Interfaces" (for people controlling their computers by remote control from an armchair ten feet away) demonstrates that the original applications are not designed for accessibility. Furthermore, Google (and all other search engines) is blind, and sees only what a blind user sees of a page; as the webmaster of a large bank has remarked, "we have noticed that improving accessibility increases our Google rating". The success of the Web has turned the browser into a central application area for the user, and you can spend most of your day working with applications in the browser, reading mail, shopping, searching your own diskdrive. The advent of applications such as Google Maps and GMail has focussed minds on delivering applications via the web, not least because it eliminates the problems involved with versioning: everyone always has the most recent version of your application. Since Web-based applications have benefits for both user and provider, we can only expect to see more of them in the future. But this approach comes at a cost. Google Maps is of the order of 200K of Javascript code. Such applications are only writable by programming experts, and producing an application is not possible by the sort of people who often produce web pages for their own use. The Web Interfaces landscape is in turmoil at the moment. Microsoft has announced a new markup language and vector graphics language for the next version of Windows; probably as a response Adobe has acquired Macromedia and therefore Flash; W3C have standards for applications in the form of XForms, XHTML and SVG and are working on "compound documents"; and other browser manufacturers are calling for their own version of HTML. What are we to make of these different approaches? Are they conflicting? Have any addressed authorability, device-independence, usability or accessibility? Is it even possible to make accessible applications? HTML made creating hypertext documents just about as easy as it could be; do any of the new approaches address this need for simplicity, or has power been irretrievably returned to the programmers? This talk discusses the requirements for Web Applications, and the underpinnings necessary to make Web Applications follow in the same spirit that engendered the Web in the first place.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Geurts, Leo, Meertens, Lambert and Pemberton, Steven (2005): ABC Programmer's Handbook. UK, Bosko Books

Everybody knows about designing web sites and computer systems so that they are easy to use, but what would happen if you designed a programming language with the same goals? The answer is ABC; a language that was designed on a 'clean sheet' with the goal of delivering an easy-to-use language ideal for teaching and learning about programming. . ABC is more readable than other languages, and has no obscure commands. . It is more concise than other languages; equivalent programs written in C are five times as long. . It is more powerful than other languages; its perfect choice of high-level data types make it an ideal tool for serious programming. . ABC was one of the inspirations for the Python programming language and Python shares key ideas and features of ABC. This book provides a hands-on introduction to the language including many programming examples along with a users guide and a complete definition of the language. The language is available free to run on PCs, Macs and UNIX

© All rights reserved Geurts et al. and/or Bosko Books

2004
 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): Scents and sensibility. In Interactions, 11 (1) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): Scratching someone else's itch: (why open source can't do usability). In Interactions, 11 (1) p. 72.

Every good work of software starts by scratching a developer's personal itch. -- Eric Raymond, The Cathedral and the Bazaar There's a closely related issue, however that I don't know how to solve yet without a big player with a lot of money, which is doing systematic user interface end user testing. We're not very good at that yet, we need to find a way to be good at it. -- Eric Raymond, Why Open Source will Rule

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): The development consortium. In Interactions, 11 (2) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): A little personalization goes a long way. In Interactions, 11 (3) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): Banking. In Interactions, 11 (4) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): The power of two. In Interactions, 11 (4) p. 64.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): Emotion. In Interactions, 11 (5) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): Goodbye!. In Interactions, 11 (6) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2004): Things that stay us from the swift completion of our appointed tasks (revisited). In Interactions, 11 (6) p. 64.

2003
 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): That old Janx Spirit. In Interactions, 10 (1) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): The kiss of the spiderbot. In Interactions, 10 (1) p. 44.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Spanning the globe. In Interactions, 10 (2) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Not so much losing a publication as gaining a Web site. In Interactions, 10 (3) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Letter writing, telephones, and television. In Interactions, 10 (3) pp. 64-ff.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Common interests. In Interactions, 10 (4) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Restrictive practices. In Interactions, 10 (4) p. 64.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): The timeless way. In Interactions, 10 (5) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Hotel heartbreak. In Interactions, 10 (5) p. 64.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): Accessibilty is for everyone. In Interactions, 10 (6) pp. 4-5.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2003): So big, so bad, so often. In Interactions, 10 (6) pp. 64-ff.

2002
 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Editorial. In Interactions, 9 (1) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Electric IP. In Interactions, 9 (1) p. 56.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Editorial. In Interactions, 9 (2) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Choose one: fast, correct, or pleasurable. In Interactions, 9 (2) pp. 128-127.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Editorial. In Interactions, 9 (3) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Use is beauty, beauty use. In Interactions, 9 (4) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Go away!. In Interactions, 9 (4) pp. 52-51.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Pemberton's laptop. In Interactions, 9 (5) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): A pixel is not a point. In Interactions, 9 (5) p. 64.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2002): Pemberton's PDA. In Interactions, 9 (6) p. 4.

2001
 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Editorial: International Browser Day. In Interactions, 8 (1) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Reflections: Photocopy this article!. In Interactions, 8 (1) p. 64.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Editorial. In Interactions, 8 (2) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Reflections: The design of notations. In Interactions, 8 (2) pp. 128-126.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Editorial. In Interactions, 8 (3) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): What's happening. In Interactions, 8 (3) pp. 7-9.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Book preview. In Interactions, 8 (3) pp. 53-56.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Editorial. In Interactions, 8 (4) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Conference preview: HCI international 2001. In Interactions, 8 (4) pp. 59-61.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Reflections: In search of the killer app. In Interactions, 8 (4) p. 64.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Editorial. In Interactions, 8 (5) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Reflections: the culture of uncertainty. In Interactions, 8 (5) pp. 51-52.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Editorial. In Interactions, 8 (6) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2001): Reflections: did convergence kill the clock?. In Interactions, 8 (6) p. 52.

 
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Neerincx, Mark A., Lindenberg, Jasper and Pemberton, Steven (2001): Support concepts for Web navigation: a cognitive engineering approach. In: Proceedings of the 2001 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2001. pp. 119-128.

2000
 
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Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Editorial. In Interactions, 7 (1) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Reflections: the demise of the book. In Interactions, 7 (1) p. 92.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Editorial. In Interactions, 7 (2) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Reflections: it rings for thee. In Interactions, 7 (3) p. 72.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Editorial. In Interactions, 7 (4) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Reflections: the accidental death of reviewing. In Interactions, 7 (4) p. 56.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Editorial. In Interactions, 7 (5) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Reflections: so much for WYSIWYG. In Interactions, 7 (5) p. 60.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): The digital library. In Interactions, 7 (6) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (2000): Reflections: abusus non tollit usum. In Interactions, 7 (6) p. 56.

1999
 
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Pemberton, Steven and Blickstein, Jay (1999): Editorial. In Interactions, 6 (1) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1999): Editorial. In Interactions, 6 (3) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven and Blickstein, Jay (1999): Editorial. In Interactions, 6 (5) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1999): Editorial. In Interactions, 6 (6) p. 2.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1999): Starting a SIGCHI Local Group in the Netherlands. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (1) pp. 17-21.

1998
 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Editorial. In Interactions, 5 (2) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Editorial. In Interactions, 5 (4) p. 4.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Reflections: Our Subliminal Art. In Interactions, 5 (5) p. 48.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): A Curtain Falls. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (1) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Flags are Not Languages. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (1) p. 96.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Not With a Whimper. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (2) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Teenagers, Sex Education and Microsoft. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (2) p. 160.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): New Developments. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (3) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): Mysteries Worth Pondering. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (3) p. 72.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): CHI 98. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): CHI 98: An Interview with the Conference Chairs. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) pp. 27-29.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1998): The Screen is Not Paper. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) p. 112.

1997
 
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Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): Achieving the Future. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (1) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): Quick! The Future is Coming!. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (1) p. 96.

We have the good fortune to work in a relatively predictable field. If we don't take advantage of this, we run the risk of making the same old mistakes.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): New SIGCHI Email Addresses. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (2) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): If Six Were Nine. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (2) p. 68.

If technology is going to take responsibility over from us, it had better do it right.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): Goodbye Diane Darrow. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (3) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): Programmers are Humans Too, 2. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (3) p. 64.

An argument for using HCI principles to design programming languages.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): CHI 97. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (4) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): CHI 97: Interviews with the Conference Co-Chairs. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (4) pp. 22-23.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1997): Hell and Documentation. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (4) p. 112.

Documentation has a user interface, and should be designed to reflect this.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): CHI as in arCHIve. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (1) p. 1.

Introduction to a special issue on the history of SIGCHI.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): SIGCHI: The Later Years: Interviews with Past Chairs. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (1) pp. 7-9.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): The SIGCHI Bulletin: Interviews with the Editors. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (1) pp. 10-13.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): The CHI Conference: Interviews with Conference Chairs. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (1) pp. 14-24.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): Programmers Are Humans Too. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (1) p. 97.

One of the pieces of evidence that HCI hasn't yet reached maturity is the fact that it is so difficult to write a GUI program.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): WWW. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (2) p. 1.

An introduction to an issue with many articles about the World Wide Web.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): Italy. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (3) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): Beep Beep!. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (3) p. 128.

An invective harangue against unnecessary noise in user interfaces.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): CHI 96. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (4) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): CHI 96: Interviews with the Conference Co-Chairs. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (4) pp. 20-22.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1996): Never is a Long Time. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (4) p. 96.

Reflections on how changing screen technology may affect how we use computers.

© All rights reserved Pemberton and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): From the Editor. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (1) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): Views and Feelings: No Such Number, No Such Zone. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (1) p. 96.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): From the Editor. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (2) p. 1.

 
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Fuller, Rodney and Pemberton, Steven (1995): Students: Deconstructing Tog: An Electronic Interview with Bruce Tognazzini. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (2) pp. 24-27.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): Views and Feelings: Gbldgk. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (2) p. 112.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): From the Editor. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (3) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): Views and Feelings: Things that Stay Us from the Swift Completion of Our Appointed Tasks. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (3) p. 112.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): From the Editor. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (4) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1995): Views and Feelings: Metaphorically Speaking. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (4) p. 96.

1994
 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): From the Editor. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (1) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): From the Editor. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (2) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): Views and Feelings. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (2) p. 96.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): From the Editor: Social Interaction: its Rewards and Retributions. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (3) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): Views and Feelings: A Word of Encouragement. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (3) p. 96.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): From the Editor: New No More. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (4) p. 1.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1994): Views and Feelings: Let Vs Coniectvre VVhat the VVorld VVovld Be Liqe Had the Roman Empire Not Fallen. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (4) p. 96.

1993
 
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Barfield, Lon, Boeve, Eddy and Pemberton, Steven (1993): Objects, Invariants and Treacle: Animation in the Views System. In: Alty, James L., Diaper, Dan and Guest, D. (eds.) Proceedings of the Eighth Conference of the British Computer Society Human Computer Interaction Specialist Group - People and Computers VIII August 7-10, 1993, Loughborough University, UK. pp. 157-171.

With interactive computer systems there are times when the user or the system can make some discreet change that takes the system from one distinct graphic state to another. Usually the feedback provided is purely 'before and after' in nature. 'Fill-in' animation gives continuity by providing the intermediate states between the two different graphic states. Such animation is already in use, but each program that uses it must implement its own special case of it. The Views system is a computing environment that unifies many aspects of computer use and application development. Within its framework 'fill-in' animation can be implemented in a general, system-wide way available to all applications.

© All rights reserved Barfield et al. and/or Cambridge University Press

 
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Boeve, Eddy, Barfield, Lon and Pemberton, Steven (1993): WYSIWYG Editors: And What Now?. In: East-West International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the EWHCI93 1993. pp. 98-115.

Most editors nowadays are said to be WYSIWYG ('What you see is what you get'). Although this implies that the effects of user actions are made immediately visible to the user, this does not usually include the effects of other causes. This a logical consequence of the fact that the user edits a copy of the document, rather than the document itself. These kind of systems then, can better be classified as 'What you see is what you will get' systems. This report describes an editor model that is a further extension of the WYSIWYG principle: 'Things are exactly as they appear', or TAXATA for short. In these kind of systems, the user carries out every action by editing, and what is more important, by editing the object directly. Furthermore, modifications made to objects by the system are made immediately visible to the user. Amongst other things, the reports describes the underlying model and the necessary editing concepts to construct such a TAXATA editor environment, based on general user-interface principles. Finally the design of one particular edit command has been described, to give an impression of the specific design issues in such an environment.

© All rights reserved Boeve et al. and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

1992
 
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Pemberton, Steven (1992): Programming Aspects of Views, an Open-Architecture Application Environment. In: Advanced Visual Interfaces 1992 1992. pp. 223-239.

1991
 
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Barfield, Lon, Boeve, Eddy and Pemberton, Steven (1991): The Views User-Interface System. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 415-416.

 
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Pemberton, Steven (1991): Open User-Interfaces, Open Applications: The Views System. In: First Moscow International HCI91 Workshop Proceedings 1991. pp. 2-12.

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/steven_pemberton.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2013
Pub. count:120
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Eddy Boeve:3
Lon Barfield:3
Jay Blickstein:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steven Pemberton's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mary Czerwinski:80
Mark A. Neerincx:22
Lon Barfield:22
 
 
 
Jul 24

There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home

-- Ken Olson

 
 

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