Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2013
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:0

 
 
Jul 12

To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior.

-- Jakob Nielsen

 
 

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Stephen Few

Picture of Stephen Few.
Has also published under the name of:
"Steve Few"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.perceptualedge.com/

Current place of employment:
Perceptual Edge

Stephen Few has over 20 years of experience as an innovator, consultant, and educator in the fields of business intelligence (a.k.a. data warehousing and decision support) and information design. Through his company, Perceptual Edge, he focuses on the effective analysis and presentation quantitative business information. Stephen is recognized as a world leader in the field of data visualization. He teaches regularly at conferences such as those presented by The Data Warehousing Institute (TDWI) and DCI, and also in the MBA program at the Haas School of Business at U. C. Berkeley. He is also the author of the book "Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten" (Analytics Press).

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Publications by Stephen Few (bibliography)

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2013
 
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Few, Stephen (2013). Control vs. the Illusion of Control: Which Works for You?. Retrieved 25 November 2013 from http://www.perceptualedge.com/blog/?p=1423

Skeuomorphism and dashboard design

© All rights reserved Few and/or his/her publisher

 
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Few, Stephen (2013). Why Most Dashboards Fail. Retrieved 13 December 2013 from Perceptual Edge: http://www.perceptualedge.com/articles/misc/WhyMostDashboardsFail.pdf

 
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Few, Stephen (2013): Information Dashboard Design: Displaying Data for At-a-Glance Monitoring. Analytics Press

A leader in the field of data visualization, Stephen Few exposes the common problems in dashboard design and describes its best practices in great detail and with a multitude of examples in this updated second edition. According to the author, dashboards have become a popular means to present critical information at a glance, yet few do so effectively. He purports that when designed well, dashboards engage the power of visual perception to communicate a dense collection of information efficiently and with exceptional clarity and that visual design skills that address the unique challenges of dashboards are not intuitive but rather learned. The book not only teaches how to design dashboards but also gives a deep understanding of the concepts—rooted in brain science—that explain the why behind the how. This revised edition offers six new chapters with sections that focus on fundamental considerations while assessing requirements, in-depth instruction in the design of bullet graphs and sparklines, and critical steps to follow during the design process. Examples of graphics and dashboards have been updated throughout, including additional samples of well-designed dashboards.

© All rights reserved Few and/or Analytics Press

2012
 
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Few, Stephen (2012): Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten. Analytics Press

Most presentations of quantitative information are poorly designed—painfully so, often to the point of misinformation. This problem, however, is rarely noticed and even more rarely addressed. We use tables and graphs to communicate quantitative information: the critical numbers that measure the health, identify the opportunities, and forecast the future of our organizations. Even the best information is useless, however, if its story is poorly told. This problem exists because almost no one has ever been trained to design tables and graphs for effective and efficient communication. Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten is the most accessible, practical, and comprehensive guide to table and graph design available. The second edition of Show Me the Numbers improves on the first by polishing the content throughout (including updated figures) and adding 91 more pages of content, including: 1) A new preface; 2) A new chapter entitled "Silly Graphs That Are Best Forsaken," which alerts readers to some of the current misuses of graphs such as donut charts, circle charts, unit charts, and funnel charts; 3) A new chapter about quantitative narrative entitled "Telling Compelling Stories with Numbers"; and 4) New appendices entitled "Constructing Table Lens Displays in Excel," "Constructing Box Plots in Excel," and "Useful Color Palettes."

© All rights reserved Few and/or Analytics Press

2010

Few, Stephen (2013): Data Visualization for Human Perception. In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/data_visualization_for_human_perception.html

2009
 
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Few, Stephen (2009): Now You See It: Simple Visualization Techniques for Quantitative Analysis. Analytics Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Data Visualization for Human Perception: [/encyclopedia/data_visualization_for_human_perception.html]


 
2006
 
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Few, Stephen (2006): Information Dashboard Design: The Effective Visual Communication of Data. OReilly Media

Dashboards have become popular in recent years as uniquely powerful tools for communicating important information at a glance. Although dashboards are potentially powerful, this potential is rarely realized. The greatest display technology in the world won't solve this if you fail to use effective visual design. And if a dashboard fails to tell you precisely what you need to know in an instant, you'll never use it, even if it's filled with cute gauges, meters, and traffic lights. Don't let your investment in dashboard technology go to waste. This book will teach you the visual design skills you need to create dashboards that communicate clearly, rapidly, and compellingly. Information Dashboard Design will explain how to: Avoid the thirteen mistakes common to dashboard design Provide viewers with the information they need quickly and clearly Apply what we now know about visual perception to the visual presentation of information Minimize distractions, cliches, and unnecessary embellishments that create confusion Organize business information to support meaning and usability Create an aesthetically pleasing viewing experience Maintain consistency of design to provide accurate interpretation Optimize the power of dashboard technology by pairing it with visual effectiveness Stephen Few has over 20 years of experience as an IT innovator, consultant, and educator. As Principal of the consultancy Perceptual Edge, Stephen focuses on data visualization for analyzing and communicating quantitative business information. He provides consulting and training services, speaks frequently at conferences, and teaches in the MBA program at the University of California in Berkeley. He is also the author of Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten.

© All rights reserved Few and/or OReilly Media

2004
 
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Few, Stephen (2004): Show Me the Numbers: Designing Tables and Graphs to Enlighten. Analytics Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Data Visualization for Human Perception: [/encyclopedia/data_visualization_for_human_perception.html]


 
 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/stephen_few.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2013
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:0

 
 
Jul 12

To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior.

-- Jakob Nielsen

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!