Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2012
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:26



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Hiroshi Ishii:6
Hayes Raffle:5
Janet Go:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Sean Follmer's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hiroshi Ishii:111
Scott R. Klemmer:38
Björn Hartmann:27
 
 
 
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Sean Follmer

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Publications by Sean Follmer (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Follmer, Sean, Ballagas, Rafael (Tico), Raffle, Hayes, Spasojevic, Mirjana and Ishii, Hiroshi (2012): People in books: using a FlashCam to become part of an interactive book for connected reading. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 685-694.

We introduce People in Books with FlashCam technology, a system that supports children and long-distance family members to act as characters in children's storybooks while they read stories together over a distance. By segmenting the video chat streams of the child and remote family member from their background surroundings, we create the illusion that the child and adult reader are immersed among the storybook illustrations. The illusion of inhabiting a shared story environment helps remote family members feel a sense of togetherness and encourages active reading behaviors for children ages three to five. People In Books is designed to fit into families' traditional reading practices, such as reading ebooks on couches or in bed via netbook or tablet computers. To accommodate this goal we implemented FlashCam, a computationally cost effective and physically small background subtraction system for mobile devices that allows users to move locations and change lighting conditions while they engage in background-subtracted video communications. A lab evaluation compared People in Books with a conventional remote reading application. Results show that People in Books motivates parents and children to be more performative readers and encourages open-ended play beyond the story, while creating a strong sense of togetherness.

© All rights reserved Follmer et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Follmer, Sean, Leithinger, Daniel, Olwal, Alex, Cheng, Nadia and Ishii, Hiroshi (2012): Jamming user interfaces: programmable particle stiffness and sensing for malleable and shape-changing devices. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 519-528.

Malleable and organic user interfaces have the potential to enable radically new forms of interactions and expressiveness through flexible, free-form and computationally controlled shapes and displays. This work, specifically focuses on particle jamming as a simple, effective method for flexible, shape-changing user interfaces where programmatic control of material stiffness enables haptic feedback, deformation, tunable affordances and control gain. We introduce a compact, low-power pneumatic jamming system suitable for mobile devices, and a new hydraulic-based technique with fast, silent actuation and optical shape sensing. We enable jamming structures to sense input and function as interaction devices through two contributed methods for high-resolution shape sensing using: 1) index-matched particles and fluids, and 2) capacitive and electric field sensing. We explore the design space of malleable and organic user interfaces enabled by jamming through four motivational prototypes that highlight jamming's potential in HCI, including applications for tabletops, tablets and for portable shape-changing mobile devices.

© All rights reserved Follmer et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Follmer, Sean, Johnson, Micah, Adelson, Edward and Ishii, Hiroshi (2011): deForm: an interactive malleable surface for capturing 2.5D arbitrary objects, tools and touch. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 527-536.

We introduce a novel input device, deForm, that supports 2.5D touch gestures, tangible tools, and arbitrary objects through real-time structured light scanning of a malleable surface of interaction. DeForm captures high-resolution surface deformations and 2D grey-scale textures of a gel surface through a three-phase structured light 3D scanner. This technique can be combined with IR projection to allow for invisible capture, providing the opportunity for co-located visual feedback on the deformable surface. We describe methods for tracking fingers, whole hand gestures, and arbitrary tangible tools. We outline a method for physically encoding fiducial marker information in the height map of tangible tools. In addition, we describe a novel method for distinguishing between human touch and tangible tools, through capacitive sensing on top of the input surface. Finally we motivate our device through a number of sample applications.

© All rights reserved Follmer et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Hartmann, Björn, Follmer, Sean, Ricciardi, Antonio, Cardenas, Timothy and Klemmer, Scott R. (2010): d.note: revising user interfaces through change tracking, annotations, and alternatives. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 493-502.

Interaction designers typically revise user interface prototypes by adding unstructured notes to storyboards and screen printouts. How might computational tools increase the efficacy of UI revision? This paper introduces d.note, a revision tool for user interfaces expressed as control flow diagrams. d.note introduces a command set for modifying and annotating both appearance and behavior of user interfaces; it also defines execution semantics so proposed changes can be tested immediately. The paper reports two studies that compare production and interpretation of revisions in d.note to freeform sketching on static images (the status quo). The revision production study showed that testing of ideas during the revision process led to more concrete revisions, but that the tool also affected the type and number of suggested changes. The revision interpretation study showed that d.note revisions required fewer clarifications, and that additional techniques for expressing revision intent could be beneficial.

© All rights reserved Hartmann et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Raffle, Hayes, Ballagas, Rafael, Revelle, Glenda, Horii, Hiroshi, Follmer, Sean, Go, Janet, Reardon, Emily, Mori, Koichi, Kaye, Joseph Jofish and Spasojevic, Mirjana (2010): Family story play: reading with young children (and Elmo) over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1583-1592.

We introduce Family Story Play, a system that supports grandparents to read books together with their grandchildren over the Internet. Family Story Play is designed to improve communication across generations and over a distance, and to support parents and grandparents in fostering the literacy development of young children. The interface encourages active child participation in the book reading experience by combining a paper book, a sensor-enhanced frame, video conferencing technology, and video content of a Sesame Street Muppet (Elmo). Results with users indicate that Family Story Play improves child engagement in long-distance communication and increases the quality of interaction between young children and distant grandparents. Additionally, Family Story Play encourages dialogic reading styles that are linked with literacy development. Ultimately, reading with Family Story Play becomes a creative shared activity that suggests a new kind of collaborative story telling.

© All rights reserved Raffle et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Follmer, Sean, Raffle, Hayes, Go, Janet and Ishii, Hiroshi (2010): Video play: playful interactions in video conferencing for long-distance families with young children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3397-3402.

Long-distance families are increasingly staying connected with free video conferencing tools. However research has highlighted a need for shared activities for long-distance family communication. While video technology is reportedly superior to audio-only tools for children under age 7, the tools themselves are not designed to accommodate children's or families needs. This paper introduces games for intergenerational families to play with young children during a video chat. We build on research in CSCW and child development to create opportunities for silliness and open-ended play between adults and young children. Our goal is to create a space for shared activities that scaffold interaction across distance and generations.

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Follmer, Sean, Raffle, Hayes, Go, Janet, Ballagas, Rafael and Ishii, Hiroshi (2010): Video play: playful interactions in video conferencing for long-distance families with young children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 49-58.

Long-distance families are increasingly staying connected with free video conferencing tools. However research has highlighted a need for shared activities for long-distance family communication. While video technology is reportedly superior to audio-only tools for children under age 7, the tools themselves are not designed to accommodate children's or families' needs. This paper introduces four design explorations of shared play activities over video conferencing that support family togetherness between children and remote adult family members. We build on research in CSCW and child development to create opportunities for silliness and open-ended play between adults and young children. Our goal is to scaffold interaction across distance and generations.

© All rights reserved Follmer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Follmer, Sean, Carr, David, Lovell, Emily and Ishii, Hiroshi (2010): CopyCAD: remixing physical objects with copy and paste from the real world. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 381-382.

This paper introduces a novel technique for integrating geometry from physical objects into computer aided design (CAD) software. We allow users to copy arbitrary real world object geometry into 2D CAD designs at scale through the use of a camera/projector system. This paper also introduces a system, CopyCAD, that uses this technique, and augments a Computer Controlled (CNC) milling machine. CopyCAD gathers input from physical objects, sketches and interactions directly on a milling machine, allowing novice users to copy parts of real world objects, modify them and then create a new physical part.

© All rights reserved Follmer et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Allison, Abel, Follmer, Sean and Raffle, Hayes (2009): TessalTable: tile-based creation of patterns and images. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 203-204.

In this paper we introduce the TessalTable, a collaborative play system for learning about tessellations and symmetry through augmented pattern blocks. Children use tiles to "pick up" a piece of an image or video. The tiles act as containers for visual content which can be arranged and rearranged anywhere on the application surface. The tile-based controls allow for simultaneous multi-user input. A preliminary study found that children understand and engage with the interface. The ability to arrange and rearrange dynamic images invites users to explore geometric patterns and connected motion.

© All rights reserved Allison et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Aziz, Amal Dar, Warren, Chris, Bursk, Hayden and Follmer, Sean (2008): The flote: an instrument for people with limited mobility. In: Tenth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2008. pp. 295-296.

The Flote is a wind instrument designed for people with limited mobility. Past work in this area has failed to deliver the musical expressiveness expected of an instrument while maintaining the low cost required for wide adoption. Using only head movement and breath control, both calibrated to match the player's abilities, the Flote is an avenue for creative expression and an enjoyable form of physical therapy. The software is available as a free download at http://www.theflote.com, and the hardware can be easily built by anyone with minimal familiarity with circuits.

© All rights reserved Aziz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

23 Nov 2012: Modified
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/sean_follmer.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2012
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:26



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Hiroshi Ishii:6
Hayes Raffle:5
Janet Go:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Sean Follmer's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hiroshi Ishii:111
Scott R. Klemmer:38
Björn Hartmann:27
 
 
 
Jul 24

There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home

-- Ken Olson

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!