Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2010
Pub. count:41
Number of co-authors:49



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Trevor Pering:6
Gaetano Borriello:4
Beverly L. Harrison:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Roy Want's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Albrecht Schmidt:111
Hans-Werner Geller..:73
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
 
 
 

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Roy Want

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Publications by Roy Want (bibliography)

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2010
 
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Pering, Trevor, Lyons, Kent, Want, Roy, Murphy-Hoye, Mary, Baloga, Mark, Noll, Paul, Branc, Joe and Benoist, Nicolas De (2010): What do you bring to the table?: investigations of a collaborative workspace. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 183-192. Available online

Collaborative spaces supporting personal mobile devices provide for a powerful integration of personalized content with supportive embedded infrastructure. Social, spatial, and informational considerations have a salient impact on such modern collaborative spaces. The design, implementation, and evaluation of a collaborative workspace prototype that directly supports the integrated use of mobile devices not only yields insights into the basic capabilities behind such a space, but also a deeper understanding of the different composition control mechanisms available. Specifically, such environments can effectively work with existing laptop platforms, and show increased promise for supporting future generations of smaller mobile devices.

© All rights reserved Pering et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Want, Roy (2009): Through Tinted Eyeglasses. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (3) pp. 2-4. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2009): How Green Is Green?. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (1) pp. 2-4. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2009): So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish*. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (4) pp. 2-3. Available online

 
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Randell, Cliff, Want, Roy, Lyons, Kent and Smailagic, Asim (2009): International Symposium on Wearable Computing (ISWC) 2008. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (1) pp. 14-17. Available online

2008
 
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Want, Roy (2008): The Bionic Man. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (1) pp. 2-4. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2008): You Are Your Cell Phone. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (2) pp. 2-4. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2008): The Seeds of Inspiration. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (3) pp. 2-3. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2008): My Digital Shoebox. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (4) pp. 2-3. Available online

2007
 
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Pering, Trevor, Anokwa, Yaw and Want, Roy (2007): Gesture connect: facilitating tangible interaction with a flick of the wrist. In: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2007. pp. 259-262. Available online

The Gesture Connect system streamlines the process of connecting to and/or controlling objects from a user's personal mobile device. Typically, in order to connect two devices together they users must follow a two-step process that consists of first selecting which devices should be connected, and then specifying what the devices should do once they are connected. By combining contact-based connections with gesture-based selection, the Gesture Connect system combines these two steps into a single physical action for simple actions, greatly simplifying the common case. In order to demonstrate and test the underlying concept, a hardware extension comprising Near Field Communication (NFC) and accelerometer capability has been developed for standard commercial mobile phone devices, along with the associated tagging and gesture recognition software. This system greatly reduces overall interaction time for common-case interaction, enhancing the overall user experience.

© All rights reserved Pering et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Want, Roy (2007): Sensor-Driven Computing Comes of Age. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (2) pp. 4-6. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2007): People First, Computers Second. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (1) pp. 4-6. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2007): Carry Small, Live Large. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (3) pp. 2-4. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2007): You're Not Paranoid; They Really Are Watching You!. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (4) pp. 2-4. Available online

 
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Anokwa, Yaw, Borriello, Gaetano, Pering, Trevor and Want, Roy (2007): A User Interaction Model for NFC Enabled Applications. In: PerCom Workshops 2007 - Fifth Annual IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications 19-23 March, 2007, White Plains, New York, USA. pp. 357-361. Available online

2006
 
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Want, Roy (2006): An Introduction to RFID Technology. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (1) pp. 25-33. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2006): Grasping the Torch. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (1) pp. 4-6. Available online

 
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Nath, Badri, Reynolds, Franklin and Want, Roy (2006): RFID Technology and Applications. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (1) pp. 22-24. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2006): Are We There Yet?. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (4) pp. 4-6. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2006): Global Perspectives. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (2) pp. 4-5. Available online

 
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Want, Roy (2006): Build What You Use. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (3) pp. 2-3. Available online

2005
 
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Pering, Trevor, Ballagas, Rafael and Want, Roy (2005): Spontaneous marriages of mobile devices and interactive spaces. In Communications of the ACM, 48 (9) pp. 53-59. Available online

 
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Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Want, Roy and Schmidt, Albrecht (eds.) PERVASIVE 2005 - Pervasive Computing, Third International Conference May 8-13, 2005, Munich, Germany.

 
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Want, Roy, Farkas, Keith I. and Narayanaswami, Chandrasekhar (2005): Guest Editors' Introduction: Energy Harvesting and Conservation. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (1) pp. 14-17. Available online

2004
 
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Want, Roy (2004): Enabling Ubiquitous Sensing with RFID. In IEEE Computer, 37 (4) pp. 84-86. Available online

2003
 
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Want, Roy and Pering, Trevor (2003): New Horizons for Mobile Computing. In: PerCom03 - Proceedings of the First IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications March 23-26, 2003, Fort Worth, Texas, USA. pp. 3-. Available online

2002
 
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Partridge, Kurt, Chatterjee, Saurav, Sazawal, Vibha, Borriello, Gaetano and Want, Roy (2002): TiltType: accelerometer-supported text entry for very small devices. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 201-204. Available online

TiltType is a novel text entry technique for mobile devices. To enter a character, the user tilts the device and presses one or more buttons. The character chosen depends on the button pressed, the direction of tilt, and the angle of tilt. TiltType consumes minimal power and requires little board space, making it appropriate for wristwatch-sized devices. But because controlled tilting of one's forearm is fatiguing, a wristwatch using this technique must be easily removable from its wriststrap. Applications include two-way paging, text entry for watch computers, web browsing, numeric entry for calculator watches, and existing applications for PDAs.

© All rights reserved Partridge et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sazawal, Vibha, Want, Roy and Borriello, Gaetano (2002): The Unigesture Approach. In: Paterno, Fabio (ed.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - 4th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2002 September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 256-270. Available online

 
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Want, Roy, Pering, Trevor, Danneels, Gunner, Kumar, Muthu, Sundar, Murali and Light, John (2002): The Personal Server: Changing the Way We Think about Ubiquitous Computing. In: Borriello, Gaetano and Holmquist, Lars Erik (eds.) UbiComp 2002 Ubiquitous Computing - 4th International Conference September 29 - October 1, 2002, Gteborg, Sweden. pp. 194-209. Available online

2001
 
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Conner, W. Steven, Krishnamurthy, Lakshman and Want, Roy (2001): Making Everyday Life Easier Using Dense Sensor Networks. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 49-55. Available online

 
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Want, Roy and Schilit, Bill N. (2001): Guest Editors' Introduction: Expanding the Horizons of Location-Aware Computing. In IEEE Computer, 34 (8) pp. 31-34. Available online

2000
 
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Borriello, Gaetano and Want, Roy (2000): Embedded Vomputation Meets the World Wide Web. In Communications of the ACM, 43 (5) pp. 59-66. Available online

 
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Fishkin, Kenneth P., Gujar, Anuj, Harrison, Beverly L., Moran, Thomas P. and Want, Roy (2000): Embodied user interfaces for really direct manipulation. In Communications of the ACM, 43 (9) pp. 74-80. Available online

1999
 
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Want, Roy, Fishkin, Kenneth P., Gujar, Anuj and Harrison, Beverly L. (1999): Bridging Physical and Virtual Worlds with Electronic Tags. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 370-377. Available online

The role of computers in the modern office has divided our activities between virtual interactions in the realm of the computer and physical interactions with real objects within the traditional office infrastructure. This paper extends previous work that has attempted to bridge this gap, to connect physical objects with virtual representations or computational functionality, via various types of tags. We discuss a variety of scenarios we have implemented using a novel combination of inexpensive, unobtrusive and easy to use RFID tags, tag readers, portable computers and wireless networking. This novel combination demonstrates the utility of invisibly, seamlessly and portably linking physical objects to networked electronic services and actions that are naturally associated with their form.

© All rights reserved Want et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Moore, Darnell J., Want, Roy, Harrison, Beverly L., Gujar, Anuj and Fishkin, Ken (1999): Implementing Phicons: Combining Computer Vision with Infrared Technology for Interactive Physical Icons. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 67-68. Available online

This paper describes a novel physical icon [3] ("phicon") based system that can be programmed to issue a range of commands about what the user wishes to do with handdrawn whiteboard content. Through the phicon's UI, a command to process whiteboard context is issued using infrared signaling in combination with image processing and a ceiling-mounted camera system. We leverage camera systems that are already used for capturing whiteboard content [4] by further augmenting these systems to detect the presence and location of IR beacons within an image. An HDLC-based protocol and a built-in IR transmitter are used to send these signals.

© All rights reserved Moore et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Fishkin, Kenneth P., Gujar, Anuj, Mochon, Carlos and Want, Roy (1998): Squeeze Me, Hold Me, Tilt Me! An Exploration of Manipulative User Interfaces. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Jolle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 17-24. Available online

This paper reports on the design and use of tactile user interfaces embedded within or wrapped around the devices that they control. We discuss three different interaction prototypes that we built. These interfaces were embedded onto two handheld devices of dramatically different form factors. We describe the design and implementation challenges, and user feedback and reactions to these prototypes. Implications for future design in the area of manipulative or haptic user interfaces are highlighted.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mynatt, Elizabeth D., Back, Maribeth, Want, Roy, Baer, Michael and Ellis, Jason B. (1998): Designing Audio Aura. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Jolle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 566-573. Available online

In this paper, we describe the process behind the design of Audio Aura. The goal of Audio Aura is to provide serendipitous information, via background auditory cues, that is tied to people's physical actions in the workplace. We used scenarios to explore issues in serendipitous information such as privacy and work practice. Our sound design was guided by a number of strategies for creating peripheral sounds grouped in cohesive ecologies. Faced with an physical and software infrastructure under development in a laboratory distant from our sound studio, we prototyped different sonic landscapes in VRML worlds. In our infrastructure design, we made a number of trade-offs in our use of legacy systems and our client-server design.

© All rights reserved Mynatt et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Mynatt, Elizabeth D., Back, Maribeth, Want, Roy and Frederick, Ron (1997): Audio Aura: Light-Weight Audio Augmented Reality. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 211-212. Available online

The physical world can be augmented with auditory cues allowing passive interaction by the user. By combining active badges, distributed systems, and wireless headphones, the movements of users through their workplace can trigger the transmission of auditory cues. These cues can summarize information about the activity of colleagues, notify the status of email or the start of a meeting, and remind of tasks such as retrieving a book at opportune times. We are currently experimenting with a prototype audio augmented reality system, Audio Aura, at Xerox PARC. The goal of this work is to create an aura of auditory information that mimics existing background, auditory awareness cues. We are prototyping sound designs for Audio Aura in VRML 2.0.

© All rights reserved Mynatt et al. and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Schilit, Bill N., Adams, Norman I. and Want, Roy (1994): Context-Aware Computing Applications. In: Proceedings of the Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications December, 1994, Santa Cruz, CA, USA. . Available online

This paper describes software that examines and reacts to an individual's changing context. Such software can promote and mediate people's interactions with devices, computers, and other people, and it can help navigate unfamiliar places. We believe that a limited amount of information covering a person's proximate environment is most important for this form of computing since the interesting part of the world around us is what we can see, hear, and touch. In this paper we define context-aware computing, and describe four categories of context-aware applications: proximate selection, automatic contextual reconfiguration, contextual information and commands, and context-triggered actions. Instances of these application types have been prototyped on the PARCTAB, a wireless, palm-sized compute

© All rights reserved Schilit et al. and/or IEEE Computer Society

 Cited in the following chapter:

Context-Aware Computing: Context-Awareness, Context-Aware User Interfaces, and Implicit Interaction: [/encyclopedia/context-aware_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Context-Aware Computing: Context-Awareness, Context-Aware User Interfaces, and Implicit Interaction: [/encyclopedia/context-aware_computing.html]


 
1992
 
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Want, Roy, Hopper, Andy, Falcao, Veronica and Gibbons, Jonathan (1992): The Active Badge Location System. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 10 (1) pp. 91-102. Available online

A novel system for the location of people in an office environment is described. Members of staff wear badges that transmit signals providing information about their location to a centralized location service, through a network of sensors. The paper also examines alternative location techniques, system design issues and applications, particularly relating to telephone call routing. Location systems raise concerns about the privacy of an individual, and these issues are also addressed.

© All rights reserved Want et al. and/or ACM Press

1991
 
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Pier, Ken, Newman, William M., Redell, David, Schmandt, Chris, Theimer, Marvin M. and Want, Roy (1991): Locator Technology in Distributed Systems: The Active Badge. In: Jong, Peter de (ed.) Proceedings of the Conference on Organizational Computing Systems 1991 November 6-8, 1991, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 285-287. Available online

Experiments with technology for locating and tracking people and things are occurring in computer science research centers in Europe and the United States. Although in its early stages, this location capability is viewed as an enabler for next-generation distributed computing systems in offices, universities, and perhaps the wider world. Such systems will no longer shackle users to their desktop PC or leave them stranded, unconnected, when using portable and notebook systems. Instead, ubiquitous wireless networks will track users and machines, delivering information and services as needed to people on the go [SciAm91]. The first of these locator technologies is called the Active Badge. Originated by Dr. Roy Want at the Olivetti Cambridge Research Lab, active badge networks are now installed at six sites [Sites]. These badges, worn in the workplace much like common corporate ID badges, use infrared technology to broadcast unique IDs to a simple network of sensors installed in laboratory spaces. The sensor network elements are polled by a central location service. Clients of that service can correlate sensor number with physical location and, for example, frequently update a location data base that is available to still other client programs. Locator technology raises a number of important questions, some of which are addressed by this panel. From the technology side, one might ask how these systems work, what other implementations are possible, and how should locator technology evolve and interact with other technologies in coming systems. Perhaps even more important are the sociological and ethical questions raised by locator capability. Will "Big Brother" monitor your every move? Must you wear an active badge to get your work done? Can you drop-in and drop-out of the location system as you wish? Can we architect systems that provide desirable services without actually revealing any individual's location and trail unless given permission by that individual? Some of these issues and some systems already in place will be discussed by our panelists.

© All rights reserved Pier et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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