Publication statistics

Pub. period:1998-2013
Pub. count:27
Number of co-authors:14



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Dylan M. Jones:9
Trevor J. Dodds:3
Justin C. D. Savage:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Roy A. Ruddle's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Stephen J. Payne:47
Andrew Howes:26
Dylan M. Jones:23
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 3
74% booked. Starts in 21 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Roy A. Ruddle

Personal Homepage:
http://www.comp.leeds.ac.uk/royr/

Add description
Rename / change spelling
Add publication
 

Publications by Roy A. Ruddle (bibliography)

 what's this?
2013
 
Edit | Del

Randell, Rebecca, Ruddle, Roy A., Mello-Thoms, Claudia, Thomas, Rhys G., Quirke, Phil and Treanor, Darren (2013): Virtual reality microscope versus conventional microscope regarding time to diagnosis: an experimental study. In Histopathology, 62 (2) pp. 351-358.

AIMS: To create and evaluate a virtual reality (VR) microscope that is as efficient as the conventional microscope, seeking to support the introduction of digital slides into routine practice. METHODS AND RESULTS:   A VR microscope was designed and implemented by combining ultra-high-resolution displays with VR technology, techniques for fast interaction, and high usability. It was evaluated using a mixed factorial experimental design with technology and task as within-participant variables and grade of histopathologist as a between-participant variable. Time to diagnosis was similar for the conventional and VR microscopes. However, there was a significant difference in the mean magnification used between the two technologies, with participants working at a higher level of magnification on the VR microscope. CONCLUSIONS:   The results suggest that, with the right technology, efficient use of digital pathology for routine practice is a realistic possibility. Further work is required to explore what magnification is required on the VR microscope for histopathologists to identify diagnostic features, and the effect on this of the digital slide production process.

© All rights reserved Randell et al. and/or John Wiley and Sons

 Cited in the following chapter:

Semi-structured qualitative studies: [/encyclopedia/semi-structured_qualitative_studies.html]


 
2012
 
Edit | Del

Do, Trien V. and Ruddle, Roy A. (2012): The design of a visual history tool to help users refind information within a website. In: Proceedings of the 2012 BCS-IRSG European Conference on Information Retrieval 2012. pp. 459-462.

On the WWW users frequently revisit information they have previously seen, but "keeping found things found" is difficult when the information has not been visited frequently or recently, even if a user knows which website contained the information. This paper describes the design of a tool to help users refind information within a given website. The tool encodes data about a user's interest in webpages (measured by dwell time), the frequency and recency of visits, and navigational associations between pages, and presents navigation histories in list- and graph-based forms.

© All rights reserved Do and Ruddle and/or Springer

2009
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2009): How do people find information on a familiar website?. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 262-268.

Previous research has investigated how people either navigate the web as a whole, or find information on websites of which they have little previous knowledge. However, it is now common for people to make frequent use of one site (e.g., their employer's intranet). This paper reports how participants recalled and navigated a familiar website they had used for 8-20 months. Sketch maps showed that participants' memory for the site's content and structure was very limited in extent, but generally accurate. Navigation data showed that participants had much more difficulty finding the region of the site that contained a piece of information, than then finding the information itself. These data highlight the need for directly accessed pages to be given greater prominence in browser history mechanisms and designers to make information regions memorable. Finally, two navigational path metrics (stratum and percentage of revisit actions) that correlated with participants' performance were identified.

© All rights reserved Ruddle and/or his/her publisher

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. and Lessels, Simon (2009): The benefits of using a walking interface to navigate virtual environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 16 (1) p. 5.

Navigation is the most common interactive task performed in three-dimensional virtual environments (VEs), but it is also a task that users often find difficult. We investigated how body-based information about the translational and rotational components of movement helped participants to perform a navigational search task (finding targets hidden inside boxes in a room-sized space). When participants physically walked around the VE while viewing it on a head-mounted display (HMD), they then performed 90% of trials perfectly, comparable to participants who had performed an equivalent task in the real world during a previous study. By contrast, participants performed less than 50% of trials perfectly if they used a tethered HMD (move by physically turning but pressing a button to translate) or a desktop display (no body-based information). This is the most complex navigational task in which a real-world level of performance has been achieved in a VE. Behavioral data indicates that both translational and rotational body-based information are required to accurately update one's position during navigation, and participants who walked tended to avoid obstacles, even though collision detection was not implemented and feedback not provided. A walking interface would bring immediate benefits to a number of VE applications.

© All rights reserved Ruddle and Lessels and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Dodds, Trevor J. and Ruddle, Roy A. (2009): Using mobile group dynamics and virtual time to improve teamwork in large-scale collaborative virtual environments. In Computers & Graphics, 33 (2) pp. 130-138.

2008
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2008): Generating Trails Automatically, to Aid Navigation When You Revisit an Environment. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 17 (6) pp. 562-574.

 
Edit | Del

Dodds, Trevor J. and Ruddle, Roy A. (2008): Mobile Group Dynamics in Large-Scale Collaborative Virtual Environments. In: IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2008 VR 2008 8-12 March, 2008, Reno, Nevada, USA. pp. 59-66.

 
Edit | Del

Dodds, Trevor J. and Ruddle, Roy A. (2008): Using Teleporting, Awareness and Multiple Views to Improve Teamwork in Collaborative Virtual Environments. In: Liere, Robert van and Mohler, Betty J. (eds.) Proceedings of the 16th Eurographics Symposium on Virtual Environments - EGVE 2008 2008, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. pp. 81-88.

2007
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2007): Tutorial 4b: Navigation - Aiding and Evaluating Navigation. In: Sherman, William R., Lin, Ming C. and Steed, Anthony (eds.) IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, VR 2007 10-14 March, 2007, Charlotte, NC, USA. p. 321.

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2007): Tutorial 4a: Navigation - Theoretical Foundations and Techniques for Travel. In: Sherman, William R., Lin, Ming C. and Steed, Anthony (eds.) IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, VR 2007 10-14 March, 2007, Charlotte, NC, USA. p. 320.

2006
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2006): Using string-matching to analyze hypertext navigation. In: Proceedings of the Seventeenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2006. pp. 49-52.

A method of using string-matching to analyze hypertext navigation was developed, and evaluated using two weeks of website logfile data. The method is divided into phases that use: (i) exact string-matching to calculate subsequences of links that were repeated in different navigation sessions (common trails through the website), and then (ii) inexact matching to find other similar sessions (a community of users with a similar interest). The evaluation showed how subsequences could be used to understand the information pathways users chose to follow within a website, and that exact and inexact matching provided complementary ways of identifying information that may have been of interest to a whole community of users, but which was only found by a minority. This illustrates how string-matching could be used to improve the structure of hypertext collections.

© All rights reserved Ruddle and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. and Lessels, Simon (2006): Three Levels of Metric for Evaluating Wayfinding. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 15 (6) pp. 637-654.

2005
 
Edit | Del

Lessels, Simon and Ruddle, Roy A. (2005): Movement Around Real and Virtual Cluttered Environments. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 14 (5) pp. 580-596.

2004
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. and Peruch, Patrick (2004): Effects of proprioceptive feedback and environmental characteristics on spatial learning in virtual environments. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 60 (3) pp. 299-326.

The effect of proprioceptive information and environmental characteristics on spatial learning was investigated when participants repeatedly navigated complex three-dimensional virtual mazes. Proprioceptive information, provided by viewing the mazes using a head-mounted display, was found to have little effect. The primary environmental characteristics were layout orthogonality (using paths that intersected at either oblique or 90{deg} angles), lines of sight (controlled using computer-generated "fog"), a visually defined perimeter and global landmarks. Participants travelled less far in orthogonal than oblique environments, even when fog was used to make the distance that participants could see equivalent. The removal of fog caused a further, substantial reduction in the distance participants travelled, indicating the importance of extended lines of sight, as predicted by the architectural theory of space syntax. Global landmarks promoted a similar rate of spatial learning to a visual perimeter.

© All rights reserved Ruddle and Peruch and/or Academic Press

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2004): Virtual and Adaptive Environments: Applications, Implications, and Human Performance Issues. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 13 (4) pp. 506-.

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2004): The Effect of Environment Characteristics and User Interaction on Levels of Virtual Environment Sicknes. In: IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2004 VR 2004 27-31 March, 2004, Chicago, IL, USA. pp. 141-148.

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2004): Colorplate: The Effect of Environment Characteristics and User Interaction on Levels of Virtual Environment Sickne. In: IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2004 VR 2004 27-31 March, 2004, Chicago, IL, USA. p. 285.

2003
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. (2003): Real-Time Rendering by Thomas Akenine-Mo"ller and Eric Haines. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 12 (5) pp. 550-552.

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Savage, Justin C. D. and Jones, Dylan M. (2003): Levels of Control during a Collaborative Carrying Task. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 12 (2) pp. 149-155.

2002
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Savage, Justin C.D. and Jones, Dylan M. (2002): Symmetric and asymmetric action integration during cooperative object manipulation in virtual environments. In Interactions, 9 (6) pp. 9-10.

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Savage, Justin C.D. and Jones, Dylan M. (2002): Symmetric and asymmetric action integration during cooperative object manipulation in virtual environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 9 (4) pp. 285-308.

Cooperation between multiple users in a virtual environment (VE) can take place at one of three levels. These are defined as where users can perceive each other (Level 1), individually change the scene (Level 2), or simultaneously act on and manipulate the same object (Level 3). Despite representing the highest level of cooperation, multiuser object manipulation has rarely been studied. This paper describes a behavioral experiment in which the piano movers' problem (maneuvering a large object through a restricted space) was used to investigate object manipulation by pairs of participants in a VE. Participants' interactions with the object were integrated together either symmetrically or asymmetrically. The former only allowed the common component of participants' actions to take place, but the latter used the mean. Symmetric action integration was superior for sections of the task when both participants had to perform similar actions, but if participants had to move in different ways (e.g., one maneuvering him/herself through a narrow opening while the other traveled down a wide corridor) then asymmetric integration was superior. With both forms of integration, the extent to which participants coordinated their actions was poor and this led to a substantial cooperation overhead (the reduction in performance caused by having to cooperate with another person).

© All rights reserved Ruddle et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Savage, Justin C. D. and Jones, Dylan M. (2002): Evaluating Rules of Interaction for Object Manipulation in Cluttered Virtual Environments. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 11 (6) pp. 591-609.

 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Savage, Justin C. D. and Jones, Dylan M. (2002): Implementing flexible rules of interaction for object manipulation in cluttered virtual environments. In: Shi, Jiaoying, Hodges, Larry F., Sun, Hanqiu and Peng, Qunsheng (eds.) VRST 2002- Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology November 11-13, 2002, Hong Kong, China. pp. 89-96.

2001
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A. and Jones, Dylan M. (2001): Movement in Cluttered Virtual Environments. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 10 (5) pp. 511-524.

2000
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Howes, Andrew, Payne, Stephen J. and Jones, Dylan M. (2000): The Effects of Hyperlinks on Navigation in Virtual Environments. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 53 (4) pp. 551-581.

Hyperlinks introduce discontinuities of movement to 3-D virtual environments (VEs). Nine independent attributes of hyperlinks are defined and their likely effects on navigation in VEs are discussed. Four experiments are described in which participants repeatedly navigated VEs that were either conventional (i.e. obeyed the laws of Euclidean space), or contained hyperlinks. Participants learned spatial knowledge slowly in both types of environment, echoing the findings of previous studies that used conventional VEs. The detrimental effects on participants' spatial knowledge of using hyperlinks for movement were reduced when a time-delay was introduced, but participants still developed less accurate knowledge than they did in the conventional VEs. Visual continuity had a greater influence on participants' rate of learning than continuity of movement, and participants were able to exploit hyperlinks that connected together disparate regions of a VE to reduce travel time.

© All rights reserved Ruddle et al. and/or Academic Press

1999
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Payne, Stephen J. and Jones, Dylan M. (1999): Navigating Large-Scale Virtual Environments: What Differences Occur Between Helmet-Mounted and Desk-Top Displays?. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 8 (2) pp. 157-168.

1998
 
Edit | Del

Ruddle, Roy A., Payne, Stephen J. and Jones, Dylan M. (1998): Navigating Large-Scale 'Desk-Top' Virtual Buildings: Effects of Orientation Aids and Familiarity. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 7 (2) pp. 179-192.

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Changes to this page (author)

20 Oct 2013: Added
09 Nov 2012: Modified
07 Nov 2012: Modified
07 Nov 2012: Modified
06 Jul 2011: Modified
02 May 2011: Modified
02 May 2011: Modified
02 May 2011: Modified
02 May 2011: Modified
02 May 2011: Modified
19 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
16 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
23 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/roy_a__ruddle.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1998-2013
Pub. count:27
Number of co-authors:14



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Dylan M. Jones:9
Trevor J. Dodds:3
Justin C. D. Savage:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Roy A. Ruddle's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Stephen J. Payne:47
Andrew Howes:26
Dylan M. Jones:23
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 3
74% booked. Starts in 21 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading