Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2011
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:7



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Enrico Rukzio:9
Paul Holleis:5
Matthias Wagner:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Robert Hardy's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Enrico Rukzio:49
Paul Holleis:20
Gregor Broll:16
 
 
 

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Robert Hardy

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Publications by Robert Hardy (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Hardy, Robert, Rukzio, Enrico, Holleis, Paul and Wagner, Matthias (2011): MyState: sharing social and contextual information through touch interactions with tagged objects. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 475-484.

Sharing social and contextual information via services like Facebook, Twitter or Foursquare has become extremely popular in the recent years. This paper introduces the novel MyState concept in which users can augment any kind of object with Near Field Communication (NFC) tags, can write any social or contextual information on those tags using their mobile phones and can publish this information on a social networking site just by touching such a tag with their phone. The distinct features of MyState are A) the possibility to augment any personal or public object with any contextual or social information, B) the possibility that everybody can touch those tags in order to post the related information to a social networking site, C) the speed and convenience to publish information by a simple touch as users don't have to look at the mobile phone screen, interact with mobile phone menus or write any text when touching an already deployed tag. The paper reports on two field studies which provide insights on where the participants placed the tags, how they used MyState and what type of information was shared. Here we observed that users typically shared identity, location, activity and time, but also feelings, social meanings and experiences. Furthermore we identified several distinct social usage patterns such as synchronizing activities, expressing moods, games and tracking shared items.

© All rights reserved Hardy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Rmelin, Sonja, Rukzio, Enrico and Hardy, Robert (2011): NaviRadar: a novel tactile information display for pedestrian navigation. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 293-302.

We introduce NaviRadar: an interaction technique for mobile phones that uses a radar metaphor in order to communicate the user's correct direction for crossings along a desired route. A radar sweep rotates clockwise and tactile feedback is provided where each sweep distinctly conveys the user's current direction and the direction in which the user must travel. In a first study, we evaluated the overall concept and tested five different tactile patterns to communicate the two different directions via a single tactor. The results show that people are able to easily understand the NaviRadar concept and can identify the correct direction with a mean deviation of 37 out of the full 360 provided. A second study shows that NaviRadar achieves similar results in terms of perceived usability and navigation performance when compared with spoken instructions. By using only tactile feedback, NaviRadar provides distinct advantages over current systems. In particular, no visual attention is required to navigate; thus, it can be spent on providing greater awareness of one's surroundings. Moreover, the lack of audio attention enables it to be used in noisy environments or this attention can be better spent on talking with others during navigation.

© All rights reserved Rmelin et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Hardy, Robert, Rukzio, Enrico, Holleis, Paul and Wagner, Matthias (2010): Mobile interaction with static and dynamic NFC-based displays. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 123-132.

This paper reports on a development framework, two prototypes, and a comparative study in the area of multi-tag Near-Field Communication (NFC) interaction. By combining NFC with static and dynamic displays, such as posters and projections, services are made more visible and allow users to interact with them easily by interacting directly with the display with their phone. In this paper, we explore such interactions, in particular, the combination of the phone display and large NFC displays. We also compare static displays and dynamic displays, and present a list of deciding factors for a particular deployment situation. We discuss one prototype for each display type and developed a corresponding framework which can be used to accelerate the development of such prototypes whilst supporting a high level of versatility. The findings of a controlled comparative study indicate, among other things, that all participants preferred the dynamic display, although the static display has advantages, e.g. with respect to privacy and portability.

© All rights reserved Hardy et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hardy, Robert, Rukzio, Enrico, Holleis, Paul, Broll, Gregor and Wagner, Matthias (2010): MyState: using NFC to share social and contextual information in a quick and personalized way. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 447-448.

Sharing social or contextual information on a social networking site is typically a quick and easy process using a laptop or desktop. However, on many occasions, the need to share this information will occur away from a computer. As an alternative, a mobile phone could be used. However, inputting the information via the phone can be time-consuming and even intrude on the user's other tasks. This will increase the likelihood that the information is lost or retrospective. By tagging physical objects using Near-Field Communication (NFC) technology, MyState provides a way for users to make the environment (to which the information is associated) interactive. By simply touching these objects with their NFC phone, they can quickly and conveniently publish this information to the virtual world. A Facebook application was used to exemplify the concept and explore the different ways in which users personalize these tagged interfaces to address their own needs.

© All rights reserved Hardy et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Rukzio, Enrico, Mller, Michael and Hardy, Robert (2009): Design, implementation and evaluation of a novel public display for pedestrian navigation: the rotating compass. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 113-122.

Important drawbacks of map-based navigation applications for mobile phones are their small screen size and that users have to associate the information provided by the mobile phone with the real word. Therefore, we designed, implemented and evaluated the Rotating Compass -- a novel public display for pedestrian navigation. Here, a floor display continuously shows different directions (in a clockwise order) and the mobile phone informs the user when their desired direction is indicated. To inform the user, the mobile phone vibrates in synchronization with the indicated direction. We report an outdoor study that compares a conventional paper map, a navigation application running on a mobile device, navigation information provided by a public display, and the Rotating Compass. The results provide clear evidence of the advantages of the new interaction technique when considering task completion time, context switches, disorientation events, usability satisfaction, workload and multi-user support.

© All rights reserved Rukzio et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Seewoonauth, Khoovirajsingh, Rukzio, Enrico, Hardy, Robert and Holleis, Paul (2009): Touch & connect and touch & select: interacting with a computer by touching it with a mobile phone. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 36.

Exchanging data between a mobile phone and a computer such as a laptop is still a very cumbersome process. This paper presents two different techniques, touch&connect and touch&select, designed help to overcome this problem and facilitate and speed up spontaneous interactions between such devices. Using touch&connect, the user can physically touch a computer in order to pair a Bluetooth connection and initiate a file transfer between these two devices. Touch&select extends this concept in that users can select a specific object or location on the computer screen by simply touching it with the mobile phone. We report the implementation of these interaction techniques based on Near Field Communication (NFC) tags and present a formal, comparative study focusing on transferring images. The results provide clear evidence of the advantages of touch&connect and touch&select when compared with current Bluetooth-based implementations. Considering task completion time for uploading and downloading pictures, touch&select was 43% and touch&connect 31% faster than the conventional Bluetooth-based approach.

© All rights reserved Seewoonauth et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Seewoonauth, Khoovirajsingh, Rukzio, Enrico, Hardy, Robert and Holleis, Paul (2009): Two NFC interaction techniques for quickly exchanging pictures between a mobile phone and a computer. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 39.

Uploading and downloading pictures between a mobile phone and a computer is still a very cumbersome process. Because of this, many users actually do not copy, move or backup their pictures onto another computer until the storage capacity of the mobile phone is reached. This paper presents the prototypes (and respective implementation details) of the touch&connect and touch&select interaction techniques. Both techniques allow the quick and easy exchange of pictures by touching the computer with the mobile device. The first interaction technique: touch&connect, allows the user to touch a computer with their mobile phone in order to establish a Bluetooth connection and initiate a file transfer between the two devices. The second interaction technique: touch&select, extends this concept and allows the selection of a specific picture or location on the computer screen by touching it with the mobile phone. The interaction techniques were implemented using Near Field Communication (NFC) tags attached to the computer and an NFC phone capable of reading those tags.

© All rights reserved Seewoonauth et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Hardy, Robert and Rukzio, Enrico (2008): Touch & interact: touch-based interaction of mobile phones with displays. In: Hofte, G. Henri ter, Mulder, Ingrid and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2008 September 2-5, 2008, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. pp. 245-254.

 
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Hardy, Robert and Rukzio, Enrico (2008): Touch & Interact: touch-based interaction with a tourist application. In: Hofte, G. Henri ter, Mulder, Ingrid and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2008 September 2-5, 2008, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. pp. 531-534.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/robert_hardy.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2011
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:7



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Enrico Rukzio:9
Paul Holleis:5
Matthias Wagner:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Robert Hardy's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Enrico Rukzio:49
Paul Holleis:20
Gregor Broll:16
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
The Psychology of Online Sales: The Beginner's Guide
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading