Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:29
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Kirsten Boehner:8
Paul Dourish:3
Eli Blevis:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Phoebe Sengers's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Paul Dourish:96
Kristina Hook:58
Rebecca E. Grinter:57
 
 
 

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Phoebe Sengers

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Personal Homepage:
cs.cornell.edu/people/sengers/

I am a faculty member in Information Science and Science & Technology Studies at Cornell, where I lead the Culturally Embedded Computing group. I am a member of the field of Computer Science and am affiliated with Visual Studies and Art.

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Publications by Phoebe Sengers (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Wyche, Susan P., Oreglia, Elisa, Ames, Morgan G., Hoadley, Christopher, Johri, Aditya, Sengers, Phoebe and Steinfield, Charles (2012): Learning from marginalized users: reciprocity in HCI4D. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 27-28.

Users in the developing world continue to appropriate information and communication technologies (ICTs) in pioneering ways resulting in innovations such as M-Pesa, the popular mobile money transfer system developed in Kenya. M-Pesa's success demonstrates the emergence of user-centered innovative applications in resource-constrained settings. The goals of our workshop are twofold: 1) to uncover more of these examples and 2) to discuss how they can influence design in developed countries.

© All rights reserved Wyche et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Neustaedter, Carman and Sengers, Phoebe (2012): Autobiographical design in HCI research: designing and learning through use-it-yourself. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 514-523.

Designing a system with yourself as a target user and evaluating the design through your own self-usage is commonly considered a questionable approach in HCI research. Perhaps for this reason, HCI research including extensive self-usage of a design is underdocumented. Yet such self-usage does happen and many researchers have found great value in the lessons learned from it. Our goal in this paper is to bring these hidden practices to light and offer guidelines for how HCI researchers can usefully engage in what we term 'autobiographical design' -- design research drawing on extensive, genuine usage by those creating or building a system. Through interviews with HCI experts who have engaged in variations of autobiographical design, we draw out the possibilities and limitations of autobiographical design methods and lay out best practices for its use as an HCI research method.

© All rights reserved Neustaedter and Sengers and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Purpura, Stephen, Schwanda, Victoria, Williams, Kaiton, Stubler, William and Sengers, Phoebe (2011): Fit4life: the design of a persuasive technology promoting healthy behavior and ideal weight. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 423-432.

This is a critical design paper offering a possible scenario of use intended to provoke reflection about values and politics of design in persuasive computing. We describe the design of a system -- Fit4Life -- that encourages individuals to address the larger goal of reducing obesity in society by promoting individual healthy behaviors. Using the Persuasive Systems Design Model [26], this paper outlines the Fit4Life persuasion context, the technology, its use of persuasive messages, and an experimental design to test the system's efficacy. We also contribute a novel discussion of the ethical and sociocultural considerations involved in our design, an issue that has remained largely unaddressed in the existing persuasive technologies literature [29].

© All rights reserved Purpura et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Leshed, Gilly and Sengers, Phoebe (2011): "I lie to myself that i have freedom in my own schedule": productivity tools and experiences of busyness. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 905-914.

This paper examines the relationship between experiences of busyness in everyday life and the use of productivity tools, including planners, calendars and to-do lists. Field study findings demonstrate that American individuals across a demographic range have internalized a cultural emphasis of busyness as a moral value to construct positive identities as busy individuals. At the same time, they struggle with a sense of conflict around busyness, reflected in real-life experiences of clashing priorities, fantasies of downtime, and struggles with anxiety, guilt, and loss of control. Our findings also point to the ways digital and non-digital productivity tools are embedded in experiences and coping practices around busyness. Grounded in our observations we propose design principles for productivity tools that support users' identities as busy people but also address some of the perils of the American busyness ethic.

© All rights reserved Leshed and Sengers and/or their publisher

 
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Pierce, James, Brynjarsdottir, Hronn, Sengers, Phoebe and Strengers, Yolande (2011): Everyday practice and sustainable HCI: understanding and learning from cultures of (un)sustainability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 9-12.

Within the CHI community we have witnessed a broadening of concerns to include various everyday contexts such as the domestic, rural and urban, as well as diverse, underrepresented, and marginalized communities. Such everyday contexts have also emerged as key areas of focus for sustainable HCI. Not only is everyday life a critical area in which material resources are exchanged, transformed, consumed and disposed, but everyday life is a site for the formation of values, attitudes, routines and habits. This workshop will bring together individuals interested in everyday practice as both a critical site and a critical lens for sustainable HCI research and professional practice. The focus of the workshop is exploring and investigating how descriptions and theories of everyday practice can be employed in order to critically and creatively rethink how HCI frames research and design issues of sustainability -- both collectively as a field and individually in participants' own work.

© All rights reserved Pierce et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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DiSalvo, Carl, Sengers, Phoebe and Brynjarsdttir, Hronn (2010): Mapping the landscape of sustainable HCI. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1975-1984.

With the recent growth in sustainable HCI, now is a good time to map out the approaches being taken and the intellectual commitments that underlie the area, to allow for community discussion about where the field should go. Here, we provide an empirical analysis of how sustainable HCI is defining itself as a research field. Based on a corpus of published works, we identify (1) established genres in the area, (2) key unrecognized intellectual differences, and (3) emerging issues, including urgent avenues for further exploration, opportunities for interdisciplinary engagement, and key topics for debate.

© All rights reserved DiSalvo et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hirsch, Tad, Sengers, Phoebe, Blevis, Eli, Beckwith, Richard and Parikh, Tapan (2010): Making food, producing sustainability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3147-3150.

Many contemporary approaches to environmental sustainability focus on the end-consumer. In this panel, we explore lessons from small food producers for future development of HCI as an agency of sustainable ways of being. We argue that attention to the relationship small producers have to the environment and their experiences of interrelations between environmental, economic, and social sustainability suggest new foundational issues for sustainable HCI research.

© All rights reserved Hirsch et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Huh, Jina, Nathan, Lisa P., Silberman, Six, Blevis, Eli, Tomlinson, Bill, Sengers, Phoebe and Busse, Daniela (2010): Examining appropriation, re-use, and maintenance for sustainability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4457-4460.

Within the past few years, the field of HCI has increasingly addressed the issue of environmental sustainability, primarily identifying the challenges and developing an agenda for designing for sustainability. Yet, the most difficult task remains, how do we develop realistic solutions when the digital ethos is based upon short-lived computing products that come and go at rapid pace. By examining appropriation, re-use, and maintenance practices, this workshop aims to identify sustainable interaction design challenges and directions in re-utilizing used or obsolete computing products for prolonged use.

© All rights reserved Huh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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DiSalvo, Carl, Sengers, Phoebe and Brynjarsdttir, Hronn (2010): Navigating the terrain of sustainable HCI. In Interactions, 17 (4) pp. 22-25.

2009
 
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DiSalvo, Carl, Boehner, Kirsten, Knouf, Nicholas A. and Sengers, Phoebe (2009): Nourishing the ground for sustainable HCI: considerations from ecologically engaged art. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 385-394.

Sustainable HCI is now a recognized area of human-computer interaction drawing from a variety of disciplinary approaches, including the arts. How might HCI researchers working on sustainability productively understand the discourses and practices of ecologically engaged art as a means of enriching their own activities? We argue that an understanding of both the history of ecologically engaged art, and the art-historical and critical discourses surrounding it, provide a fruitful entry-point into a more critically aware sustainable HCI. We illustrate this through a consideration of frameworks from the arts, looking specifically at how these frameworks act more as generative devices than prescriptive recipes. Taking artistic influences seriously will require a concomitant rethinking of sustainable HCI standpoints -- a potentially useful exercise for HCI research in general.

© All rights reserved DiSalvo et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Leshed, Gilly, Velden, Theresa, Rieger, Oya, Kot, Blazej and Sengers, Phoebe (2008): In-car gps navigation: engagement with and disengagement from the environment. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1675-1684.

Although in-car GPS navigation technology is proliferating, it is not well understood how its use alters the ways people interpret their environment and navigate through it. We argue that GPS-based car navigation might disengage people from their surrounding environment, but also has the potential to open up novel ways to engage with it. We present an ethnographically-informed study with GPS users, showing evidence for practices of disengagement as well as new opportunities for engagement, illustrating our findings using rich descriptions from the field. Grounded in our observations we propose design principles for GPS systems that support richer experiences of driving. We argue that for a fuller understanding of issues of disengagement and engagement with the environment we need to move beyond a focus on the (re)design of GPS devices, and point to future directions of work that embrace a broader perspective.

© All rights reserved Leshed et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Blevis, Eli, Friedman, Batya, Hasbrouck, Jay and Sengers, Phoebe (2008): Beyond the hype: sustainability & HCI. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2273-2276.

In this panel we explore: (1) the burgeoning discourse on sustainability concerns within HCI, (2) the material and behavioral challenges of sustainability in relation to interaction design, (3) the benefits and risks involved in labeling a project or product as environmentally sustainable, and (4) implications of taking on (or ignoring) sustainability as a research, design, and teaching topic for HCI.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Leahu, Lucian, Thom-Santelli, Jennifer, Pederson, Claudia and Sengers, Phoebe (2008): Taming the situationist beast. In: Proceedings of DIS08 Designing Interactive Systems 2008. pp. 203-211.

The interplay between arts and HCI has become increasingly commonplace in the past years, offering new opportunities for approaching interaction, but also raising challenges in integrating methods and insights from across a great disciplinary divide. In this paper, we examine the ways Situationist art practice has been used as an inspiration for HCI design. We argue that methods from Situationist art practice have often been picked up without regard for their underlying sensibility: reflection and improvisation in an activist socio-political context. We describe an experiment in incorporating Situationist sensibility in design and use it to elucidate the challenges that face HCI in truly integrating the arts.

© All rights reserved Leahu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Leahu, Lucian, Schwenk, Steve and Sengers, Phoebe (2008): Subjective objectivity: negotiating emotional meaning. In: Proceedings of DIS08 Designing Interactive Systems 2008. pp. 425-434.

Affective computing systems face challenges in relating objective measures with subjective human experiences. Many systems have either focused on objective measures as a substitute for subjective experience (e.g. skin conductance as a direct representation of arousal) or have abandoned objective measures to focus purely on subjective experience. In this paper, we explore how to negotiate the relationship between objective signals and subjective experiences by highlighting the role of human interpretation. Our approach is informed by a reflective analysis drawing on the arts and the humanities and by a participatory study examining the emergence of emotional meaning. We demonstrate the potential of our approach for interactive affective systems through a series of conceptual designs that embody these understandings.

© All rights reserved Leahu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Boehner, Kirsten, Sengers, Phoebe and Warner, Simeon (2008): Interfaces with the ineffable: Meeting aesthetic experience on its own terms. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 15 (3) p. 12.

A variety of approaches have emerged in HCI that grapple with the ineffable, ill-defined, and idiosyncratic nature of aesthetic experience. The most straightforward approach is to transform the ineffable aspects of these experiences into precise representations, producing systems that are well-defined and testable but may miss the fullness of the experienced phenomenon. But without formal models and codified methods, how can we design and evaluate for a phenomenon we aren't sure can be adequately captured? In this article, we present a case study of a system for reflection and awareness of emotional presence that was, in a sense, lived into being. Through system design, use, and evaluation we recount how the system evolved into something that enhanced rather than impoverished the sympathetic awareness of another. In discussing the strategies and results of the case study, we examine what it means for the HCI community to not only design for aesthetic experiences but also bring aesthetics into the practice of HCI.

© All rights reserved Boehner et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Leahu, Lucian, Sengers, Phoebe and Mateas, Michael (2008): Interactionist AI and the promise of ubicomp, or, how to put your box in the world without putting the world in your box. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 134-143.

 
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Sengers, Phoebe, Boehner, Kirsten, Mateas, Michael and Gay, Geri (2008): The disenchantment of affect. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (5) pp. 347-358.

2007
 
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Gaver, William W., Sengers, Phoebe, Kerridge, Tobie, Kaye, Joseph Jofish and Bowers, John (2007): Enhancing ubiquitous computing with user interpretation: field testing the home health horoscope. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 537-546.

Domestic ubiquitous computing systems often rely on inferences about activities in the home, but the open-ended, dynamic and heterogeneous nature of the home poses serious problems for such systems. In this paper, we propose that by shifting the responsibility for interpretation from the system to the user, we can build systems that interact with people at humanly meaningful levels, preserve privacy, and encourage engagement with suggested topics. We describe a system that embodies this hypothesis, using sensors and inferencing software to assess 'domestic wellbeing' and presenting the results to inhabitants through an output chosen for its ambiguity. In a three-month field study of the system, customised for a particular volunteer household, users engaged extensively with the system, discussing and challenging its outputs and responding to the particular topics it raised.

© All rights reserved Gaver et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Boehner, Kirsten, Vertesi, Janet, Sengers, Phoebe and Dourish, Paul (2007): How HCI interprets the probes. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1077-1086.

We trace how cultural probes have been adopted and adapted by the HCI community. The flexibility of probes has been central to their uptake, resulting in a proliferation of divergent uses and derivatives. The varying patterns of adaptation of the probes reveal important underlying issues in HCI, suggesting under acknowledged disagreements about valid interpretation and the relationship between methods and their underlying methodology. With this analysis, we aim to clarify discussions around probes, and, more importantly, around how we define and evaluate methods in HCI, especially those grounded in unfamiliar conceptions of how research should be done.

© All rights reserved Boehner et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Foucault, Brooke, Mentis, Helena M., Sengers, Phoebe and Welles, Devon (2007): Provoking sociability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1557-1560.

In this study, we explore the potential usefulness of disturbing, uncomfortable systems, demonstrating that provocative technology can have a positive effect on social relationships. We designed and evaluated an agent-based system that collects user information by asking seemingly benign questions, and then uses it to spread false, strange gossip throughout an office space. We show that provocative interaction on-line can improve off-line sociability.

© All rights reserved Foucault et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Boehner, Kirsten, dePaula, Rogerio, Dourish, Paul and Sengers, Phoebe (2007): How emotion is made and measured. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 65 (4) pp. 275-291.

How we design and evaluate for emotions depends crucially on what we take emotions to be. In affective computing, affect is often taken to be another kind of information -- discrete units or states internal to an individual that can be transmitted in a loss-free manner from people to computational systems and back. While affective computing explicitly challenges the primacy of rationality in cognitivist accounts of human activity, at a deeper level it often relies on and reproduces the same information-processing model of cognition. Drawing on cultural, social, and interactional critiques of cognition which have arisen in human-computer interaction (HCI), as well as anthropological and historical accounts of emotion, we explore an alternative perspective on emotion as interaction: dynamic, culturally mediated, and socially constructed and experienced. We demonstrate how this model leads to new goals for affective systems -- instead of sensing and transmitting emotion, systems should support human users in understanding, interpreting, and experiencing emotion in its full complexity and ambiguity. In developing from emotion as objective, externally measurable unit to emotion as experience, evaluation, too, alters focus from externally tracking the circulation of emotional information to co-interpreting emotions as they are made in interaction.

© All rights reserved Boehner et al. and/or Academic Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Harrison, Steve, Art, Courtesy, Tatar, Deborah and Sengers, Phoebe (2007): The Three Paradigms of HCI. In: Begole, Bo, Payne, Stephen, Churchill, Elizabeth, Amant, Rob St., Gilmore, David and Rosson, Mary B. (eds.) Proceedings of Computer/Human Interaction 2007 April 28 May 3, 2007, San Jose, USA. pp. 1-18.

Informal histories of HCI commonly document two major intellectual waves that have formed the field: the first orienting from engineering/human factors with its focus on optimizing man-machine fit, and the second stemming from cognitive science, with an increased emphasis on theory and on what is happening not only in the computer but, simultaneously, in the human mind. In this paper, we document underlying forces that constitute a third wave in HCI and suggest systemic consequences for the CHI community. We provisionally name this the phenomenological matrix'. In the course of creating technologies such as ubiquitous computing, visualization, affective and educational technology, a variety of approaches are addressing issues that are bad fits to prior paradigms, ranging from embodiment to situated meaning to values and social issues. We demonstrate the underlying unity of these approaches, and document how they suggest the centrality of currently marginal criteria for design, evaluation, appreciation, and developmental methodology in CHI work.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
2006
 
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Sengers, Phoebe and Gaver, William (2006): Staying open to interpretation: engaging multiple meanings in design and evaluation. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 99-108.

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) often focuses on how designers can develop systems that convey a single, specific, clear interpretation of what they are for and how they should be used and experienced. New domains such as domestic and public environments, new influences from the arts and humanities, and new techniques in HCI itself are converging to suggest that multiple, potentially competing interpretations can fruitfully co-exist. In this paper, we lay out the contours of the new space opened by a focus on multiple interpretations, which may more fully address the complexity, dynamics and interplay of user, system, and designer interpretation. We document how design and evaluation strategies shift when we abandon the presumption that a specific, authoritative interpretation of the systems we build is necessary, possible or desirable.

© All rights reserved Sengers and Gaver and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Usability Evaluation: [/encyclopedia/usability_evaluation.html]


 
 
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Wyche, Susan, Sengers, Phoebe and Grinter, Rebecca E. (2006): Historical Analysis: Using the Past to Design the Future. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 35-51.

2005
 
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Boehner, Kirsten, dePaula, Rogerio, Dourish, Paul and Sengers, Phoebe (2005): Affect: from information to interaction. In: Bertelsen, Olav W., Bouvin, Niels Olof, Krogh, Peter Gall and Kyng, Morten (eds.) Proceedings of the 4th Decennial Conference on Critical Computing 2005 August 20-24, 2005, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 59-68.

While affective computing explicitly challenges the primacy of rationality in cognitivist accounts of human activity, at a deeper level it relies on and reproduces the same information-processing model of cognition. In affective computing, affect is often seen as another kind of information - discrete units or states internal to an individual that can be transmitted in a loss-free manner from people to computational systems and back. Drawing on cultural, social, and interactional critiques of cognition which have arisen in HCI, we introduce and explore an alternative model of emotion as interaction: dynamic, culturally mediated, and socially constructed and experienced. This model leads to new goals for the design and evaluation of affective systems - instead of sensing and transmitting emotion, systems should support human users in understanding, interpreting, and experiencing emotion in its full complexity and ambiguity.

© All rights reserved Boehner et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
 
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Sengers, Phoebe, Boehner, Kirsten, David, Shay and Kaye, Joseph Jofish (2005): Reflective design. In: Bertelsen, Olav W., Bouvin, Niels Olof, Krogh, Peter Gall and Kyng, Morten (eds.) Proceedings of the 4th Decennial Conference on Critical Computing 2005 August 20-24, 2005, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 49-58.

 
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Sengers, Phoebe, Boehner, Kirsten, Warner, Simeon and Jenkins, Tom (2005): Evaluating Affector: Co-Interpreting What 'Works'. In: CHI 2005 Workshop on Innovative Approaches to Evaluating Affective Systems 2005. .

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affective Computing: [/encyclopedia/affective_computing.html]


 
2003
 
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Hook, Kristina, Sengers, Phoebe and Andersson, Gerd (2003): Sense and sensibility: evaluation and interactive art. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 241-248.

2002
 
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Sengers, Phoebe, Liesendahi, Rainer, Magar, Werner, Seibert, Christoph, Muller, Boris, Joachims, Thorsten, Geng, Weidong, Martensson, Pia and Hook, Kristina (2002): The enigmatics of affect. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 87-98.

Affective computation generally focuses on the informatics of affect: structuring, formalizing, and representing emotion as informational units. We propose instead an enigmatics of affect, a critical technical practice that respects the rich and undefinable complexities of human affective experience. Our interactive installation, the Influencing Machine, allows users to explore a dynamic landscape of emotionally expressive sound and child-like drawings, using a tangible, intuitive input device that supports open-ended engagement. The Influencing Machine bridges the subjective experience of the user and the necessary objective rationality of the underlying code. It functions as a cultural probe, reflecting and challenging users to reflect on the cultural meaning of affective computation.

© All rights reserved Sengers et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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