Publication statistics

Pub. period:1983-2012
Pub. count:24
Number of co-authors:31



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert Neches:5
Ping Luo:4
Rajiv T. Maheswaran:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Pedro Szekely's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Brad A. Myers:154
Scott E. Hudson:113
James D. Foley:49
 
 
 
Jul 30

It's all about one thing: creative problem-solving to get the story out.

-- Robert Greenberg, R/GA, 2006

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!

 
 

Pedro Szekely

Picture of Pedro Szekely.
Personal Homepage:
isi.edu/people/pszekely/about

Add description
Add publication

Publications by Pedro Szekely (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro, Chang, Yu-Han, Maheswaran, Rajiv, Wang, Yan, Cheng, Huihui and Singh, Karan (2012): Interactive uncertainty analysis. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2012. pp. 269-272.

Humans have difficulty evaluating the effects of uncertainty on schedules. People often mitigate the effects of uncertainty by adding slack based on experience and non-stochastic analyses such as the critical path method (CPM). This is costly as it leads to longer than necessary schedules, and can be ineffective without a clear understanding of where slack is needed. COMPASS is an interactive real-time tool that analyzes schedule uncertainty for a stochastic task network. An important feature is that it concurrently calculates stochastic critical paths and critical tasks. COMPASS visualizes this information on top of a traditional Gantt view, giving users insight into how delays caused by uncertain durations propagate down the schedule. Evaluations with 10 users show that users can use COMPASS to answer a variety of questions about the possible evolutions of a schedule (e.g., what is the likelihood that all activities will complete before a given date?)

© All rights reserved Szekely et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Tuchinda, Rattapoom, Knoblock, Craig A. and Szekely, Pedro (2011): Building Mashups by Demonstration. In ACM Transactions on the Web, 5 (3) p. 16.

The latest generation of WWW tools and services enables Web users to generate applications that combine content from multiple sources. This type of Web application is referred to as a mashup. Many of the tools for constructing mashups rely on a widget paradigm, where users must select, customize, and connect widgets to build the desired application. While this approach does not require programming, the users must still understand programming concepts to successfully create a mashup. As a result, they are put off by the time, effort, and expertise needed to build a mashup. In this article, we describe our programming-by-demonstration approach to building mashup by example. Instead of requiring a user to select and customize a set of widgets, the user simply demonstrates the integration task by example. Our approach addresses the problems of extracting data from Web sources, cleaning and modeling the extracted data, and integrating the data across sources. We implemented these ideas in a system called Karma, and evaluated Karma on a set of 23 users. The results show that, compared to other mashup construction tools, Karma allows more of the users to successfully build mashups and makes it possible to build these mashups significantly faster compared to using a widget-based approach.

© All rights reserved Tuchinda et al. and/or ACM

2008
 
Edit | Del

Jin, Jing, Sanchez, Romeo, Maheswaran, Rajiv T. and Szekely, Pedro (2008): VizScript: on the creation of efficient visualizations for understanding complex multi-agent systems. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 40-49.

One of the most difficult tasks in software development is understanding the behavior of the final product. Making sure that a system behaves as users expect is a challenging endeavor. Understanding the behavior of a multi-agent system is even more challenging given the additional complexities of multi-agent problems. In this paper, we address the problem of users creating visualizations to debug and understand complex multi-agent systems. We introduce VizScript, a generic framework that expedites the process of creating such visualizations. VizScript combines a generic application instrumentation, a knowledge-base, and simple scene definitions primitives with a reasoning system, to produce an easy to use visualization platform. Using VizScript, we were able to recreate the visualizations for a complex multiagent system with an order-of-magnitude less effort than was required in a Java implementation.

© All rights reserved Jin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Tuchinda, Rattapoom, Szekely, Pedro and Knoblock, Craig A. (2008): Building Mashups by example. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 139-148.

Creating a Mashup, a web application that integrates data from multiple web sources to provide a unique service, involves solving multiple problems, such as extracting data from multiple web sources, cleaning it, and combining it together. Existing work relies on a widget paradigm where users address those problems during a Mashup building process by selecting, customizing, and connecting widgets together. While these systems claim that their users do not have to write a single line of code, merely abstracting programming methods into widgets has several disadvantages. First, as the number of widgets increases to support more operations, locating the right widget for the task can be confusing and time consuming. Second, customizing and connecting these widgets usually requires users to understand programming concepts. In this paper, we present a Mashup building approach that (a) combines most problem areas in Mashup building into a unified interactive framework that requires no widgets, and (b) allows users with no programming background to easily create Mashups by example.

© All rights reserved Tuchinda et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Sanchez, Romeo, Jin, Jing, Maheswaran, Rajiv T. and Szekely, Pedro (2008): Interfaces for team coordination. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2008. pp. 427-428.

Coordinators are intelligent software agents that help humans to collaborate and coordinate execution of multiple activities in dynamic, distributed and uncertain domains. One of the main challenges is the generation of effective user interfaces for team coordination. Intelligent interfaces that avoid information overload, and facilitate user interactions to repair mission plans are needed, and they are the focus of this work.

© All rights reserved Sanchez et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
Edit | Del

Tuchinda, Rattapoom, Szekely, Pedro and Knoblock, Craig A. (2007): Building data integration queries by demonstration. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2007. pp. 170-179.

The magnitude of data available on the web prompts the need for an easy to use query interface that enables users to integrate data from multiple web sources in an intelligent fashion. Past work in the area of databases has resulted in different query interface systems that simplify query formulation. While these approaches reduce the user's effort to compose queries, the user is still required to pick data sources to use and the interaction is not guaranteed to yield a non-empty result set. We introduce a novel approach that exploits the structure of the relational data source(s) to formulate a set of constraints. These constraints are used in conjunction with partial plans to produce an intelligent query interface that (a) does not require the user to know details about data sources or existing values (b) suggests valid inputs to the user (c) creates consistent queries that always return values.

© All rights reserved Tuchinda et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Jin, Jing, Maheswaran, Rajiv T., Sanchez, Romeo and Szekely, Pedro (2007): VizScript: visualizing complex interactions in multi-agent systems. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2007. pp. 369-372.

We address the problem of users creating visualizations to debug and understand multi-agent systems. The key challenges are that (1) needs arise dynamically, i.e., it is difficult to know a priori what visualizations one wants, (2) extensive expertise on the system, the algorithms and visualization tools are often needed for implementation, and (3) agents can be running in a distributed environment. We have developed VizScript, a collection of tools to expedite the process of creating visualizations. VizScript combines a generic application instrumentation, a knowledge base, and simple scene definition primitives with a reasoning system, to produce an easy to use visualization system. Using VizScript we were able to recreate the visualizations for a complex multi-agent system with an order-of-magnitude less effort than was required in a Java implementation.

© All rights reserved Jin et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro, Rogers, Craig Milo and Frank, Martin (2001): Interfaces for Understanding Multi-Agent Behavior. In: International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2001 January 14-17, 2001, Sanata Fe, New Mexico, USA. pp. 161-166.

Synchronized punch-card displays are an interface technique to visualize tens of thousands of variables by encoding their values as color chips in a rectangular array. Our technique ties multiple such displays to a timeline of events enabling the punch-card displays to show animations of the behavior of complex systems. Punch-card displays not only make it easy to understand the high-level behavior of systems, but also enable users to quickly focus on individual variables and on fine-grained time intervals. This paper describes synchronized punch-card displays and shows how this technique is extremely powerful for understanding the behavior of complex multi-agent systems.

© All rights reserved Szekely et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
Edit | Del

Frank, Martin and Szekely, Pedro (1999): Collapsible User Interfaces for Information Retrieval Agents. In: Maybury, Mark T. (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1999 January 5-8, 1999, Redondo Beach, California, USA. pp. 15-22.

This paper presents an architecture for information retrieval agents in which each agent declaratively describes its domain, input, output, and user interface. A mediating piece of software can then assemble software agents for a given information retrieval task, and produce a single, unified user interface for that task from the individual agents' descriptions.

© All rights reserved Frank and Szekely and/or ACM Press

1998
 
Edit | Del

Frank, Martin R. and Szekely, Pedro (1998): Adaptive Forms: An Interaction Paradigm for Entering Structured Data. In: Marks, Joe (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1998 January 6-9, 1998, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 153-160.

Many software applications solicit input from the user via a "forms" paradigm that emulates their paper equivalent. It exploits the users' familiarity with these and is well suited for the input of simple attribute-value data (name, phone number, ...). The paper-forms paradigm starts breaking down when there is user input that may or may not be applicable depending on previous user input. In paper-based forms, this manifests itself by sections marked "fill out only if you entered yes in question 8a above", and simple electronic forms suffer from the same problem -- much space is taken up for input fields that are not applicable. One possible approach to making only relevant sections appear is to hand-write program fragments to hide and show them. As an alternative, we have developed a form specification language based on a context-free grammar that encodes data dependencies of the input, together with an accompanying run-time interpreter that uses novel layout techniques for collapsing already-entered input fields, for "blending" input fields possibly yet to come, and for showing only the applicable sections of the form.

© All rights reserved Frank and Szekely and/or ACM Press

1997
 
Edit | Del

Castells, Pablo, Szekely, Pedro and Salcher, Ewald (1997): Declarative Models of Presentation. In: Moore, Johanna D., Edmonds, Ernest and Puerta, Angel R. (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1997 January 6-9, 1997, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 137-144.

Current interface development tools cannot be used to specify complex displays without resorting to programming using a toolkit or graphics package. Interface builders and multi-media authoring tools only support the construction of static displays where the components of the display are known at design time (e.g., buttons, menus). This paper describes a presentation modeling system where complex displays of dynamically changing data can be modeled declaratively. The system incorporates principles of graphic design such as guides and grids, supports constraint-based layout and automatic update when data changes, has facilities for easily specifying the layout of collections of data, and has facilities for making displays sensitive to the characteristics of the data being presented and the presentation context (e.g., amount of space available). Finally, the models are designed to be amenable to interactive specification and specification using demonstrational techniques.

© All rights reserved Castells et al. and/or ACM Press

1994
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States.

 
Edit | Del

Moriyon, Roberto, Szekely, Pedro and Neches, Robert (1994): Automatic Generation of Help from Interface Design Models. In: Adelson, Beth, Dumais, Susan and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 94 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-28, 1994, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 225-231.

Model-based interface design can save substantial effort in building help systems for interactive applications by generating help automatically from the model used to implement the interface, and by providing a framework for developers to easily refine the automatically-generated help texts. This paper describes a system that generates hypertext-based help about data presented in application displays, commands to manipulate data, and interaction techniques to invoke commands. The refinement component provides several levels of customization, including programming-by-example techniques to let developers edit directly help windows that the system produces, and the possibility to refine help generation rules.

© All rights reserved Moriyon et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Zanden, Brad Vander, Myers, Brad A., Giuse, Dario and Szekely, Pedro (1994): Integrating Pointer Variables into One-Way Constraint Models. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 1 (2) pp. 161-213.

Pointer variables have long been considered useful for constructing and manipulating data structures in traditional programming languages. This article discusses how pointer variables can be integrated into one-way constraint models and indicates how these constraints can be usefully employed in user interfaces. Pointer variables allow constraints to model a wide array of dynamic application behavior, simplify the implementation of structured objects and demonstrational systems, and improve the storage and efficiency of constraint-based applications. This article presents two incremental algorithms -- one lazy and one eager -- for solving constraints with pointer variables. Both algorithms are capable of handling (1) arbitrary systems of one-way constraints, including constraints that involve cycles, and (2) editing models that allow multiple changes between calls to the constraint solver. These algorithms are fault tolerant in that they can handle and recover gracefully from formulas that crash due to programmer error. Constraints that use pointer variables have been implemented in a comprehensive user interface toolkit, Garnet, and our experience with applications written in Garnet have proven the usefulness of pointer variable constraints. Many large-scale applications have been implemented using these constraints.

© All rights reserved Zanden et al. and/or ACM Press

1993
 
Edit | Del

Neches, Robert, Aberg, Peter, Benjamin, David, Harp, Brian, Hu, Liyi, Luo, Ping, Moriyon, Roberto and Szekely, Pedro (1993): The Integrated User-Support Environment (IN-USE) Group at USC/ISI. In: Ashlund, Stacey, Mullet, Kevin, Henderson, Austin, Hollnagel, Erik and White, Ted (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 93 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-29, 1993, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 53-54.

Integrated user support environments are individual and cooperative-work systems which allow their users to perform a large quantity of their daily work on-line, and which do so by providing access to a comprehensive set of tools that interact smoothly with each other and present a uniform interface to the users. The INtegrated User-Support Environments (IN-USE) Group is developing a framework for facilitating construction of such systems. The framework is oriented toward assisting users who must timeshare between multiple, highly information-intensive data analysis and problem solving tasks. Our fundamental goals are to help developers quickly assemble support environments that offer reasonable default appearance and behavior, and to make it easy to then customize those environments as needed.

© All rights reserved Neches et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Luo, Ping, Szekely, Pedro and Neches, Robert (1993): Management of Interface Design in HUMANOID. In: Ashlund, Stacey, Mullet, Kevin, Henderson, Austin, Hollnagel, Erik and White, Ted (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 93 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-29, 1993, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 107-114.

Today's interface design tools either force designers to handle a tremendous number of design details, or limit their control over design decisions. Neither of these approaches taps the true strengths of either human designers or computers in the design process. This paper presents a human-computer collaborative system that uses a model-based approach for interface design to help designers search the design space effectively and construct executable specifications of application user interfaces. This human-in-the-loop environment focuses human designers on decision making, and utilizes the bookkeeping capabilities of computers for regular and tedious tasks. We describe (a) the underlying modeling technique and an execution environment that allows even incompletely-specified designs to be executed for evaluation and testing purposes, and (b) a tool that decomposes high-level design goals into the necessary implementation steps, and helps designers manage the myriad of details that arise during design.

© All rights reserved Luo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Neches, Robert, Foley, James D., Szekely, Pedro, Sukaviriya, Piyawadee, Luo, Ping, Kovacevic, Srdjan and Hudson, Scott E. (1993): Knowledgeable Development Environments Using Shared Design Models. In: Gray, Wayne D., Hefley, William and Murray, Dianne (eds.) International Workshop on Intelligent User Interfaces 1993 January 4-7, 1993, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 63-70.

We describe MASTERMIND, a step toward our vision of a knowledge-based design-time and run-time environment in which human-computer interfaces development is centered around an all-encompassing design model. The MASTERMIND approach is intended to provide integration and continuity across the entire life cycle of the user interface. In addition, it facilitates higher quality work within each phase of the life cycle. MASTERMIND is an open framework, in which the design knowledge base allows multiple tools to come into play and makes knowledge created by each tool accessible to the others.

© All rights reserved Neches et al. and/or ACM Press

1992
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro, Luo, Ping and Neches, Robert (1992): Facilitating the Exploration of Interface Design Alternatives: The HUMANOID Model of Interface Design. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 507-515.

HUMANOID is a user interface design tool that lets designers express abstract conceptualizations of an interface in an executable form, allowing designers to experiment with scenarios and dialogues even before the application model is completely worked out. Three properties of the HUMANOID approach allow it to do so: a modularization of design issues into independent dimensions, support for multiple levels of specificity in mapping application models to user interface constructs, and mechanisms for constructing executable default user interface implementations from whatever level of specificity has been provided by the designer.

© All rights reserved Szekely et al. and/or ACM Press

1991
 
Edit | Del

Zanden, Brad Vander, Myers, Brad A., Giuse, Dario and Szekely, Pedro (1991): The Importance of Pointer Variables in Constraint Models. In: Rhyne, James R. (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States, 1991, Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States. pp. 155-164.

Graphical tools are increasingly using constraints to specify the graphical layout and behavior of many parts of an application. However, conventional constraints directly encode the objects they reference, and thus cannot provide support for the dynamic runtime creation and manipulation of application objects. This paper discusses an extension to current constraint models that allows constraints to indirectly reference objects through pointer variables. Pointer variables permit programmers to create the constraint equivalent of procedures in traditional programming languages. This procedural abstraction allows constraints to model a wide array of dynamic application behavior, simplifies the implementation of structured object and demonstrational systems, and improves the storage and efficiency of highly interactive, graphical applications. It also promotes a simpler, more effective style of programming than conventional constraints. Constraints that use pointer variables are powerful enough to allow a comprehensive user interface toolkit to be built for the first time on top of a constraint system.

© All rights reserved Zanden et al. and/or ACM Press

1990
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro (1990): Template-Based Mapping of Application Data to Interactive Displays. In: Hudson, Scott E. (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology October 03 - 05, 1990, Snowbird, Utah, United States. pp. 1-9.

This paper describes a template-based method for constructing interactive displays with the building-blocks (widgets) provided in a user interface toolkit. Templates specify how to break down complex application objects into smaller pieces, specify the graphical components (widgets) to be used for displaying each piece, and specify their layout. Complex interfaces are constructed by recursively applying templates, thus constructing a tree of widgets to display a complex application object. The template-based method is more general than the interactive, WYSIWYG interface builders in that it can specify dynamic displays for application data that changes at run time. The template-based method also leas to more consistent, extendible and modifiable interfaces.

© All rights reserved Szekely and/or ACM Press

1989
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro (1989): Standardizing the Interface Between Applications and UIMSs. In: Sibert, John L. (ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology November 13 - 15, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. pp. 34-42.

The user interface building blocks of any User Interface Management System (UIMS) have built-in assumptions about what information about application programs they need, and assumptions about how to get that information. The lack of a standard to represent this information leads to a proliferation of different assumptions by different building blocks, hampering changeability of the user interface and portability of applications to different sets of building blocks. This paper describes a formalism for specifying the information about applications needed by the user interface building blocks (i.e. the UIMS/Application interface) so that all building blocks share a common set of assumptions. The paper also describes a set of user interface building blocks specifically designed for these standard UIMS/Application interfaces. These building blocks can be used to produce a wide variety of user interfaces, and the interfaces can be changed without having to change the application program.

© All rights reserved Szekely and/or ACM Press

1987
 
Edit | Del

Szekely, Pedro (1987): Modular implementation of presentations. In: Graphics Interface 87 (CHI+GI 87) April 5-9, 1987, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 235-240.

1985
 
Edit | Del

Hayes, Philip J., Szekely, Pedro and Lerner, Richard A. (1985): Design Alternatives for User Interface Management Systems Based on Experience with COUSIN. In: Borman, Lorraine and Curtis, Bill (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 85 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1985, San Francisco, California. pp. 169-175.

User interface management systems (UIMSs) provide user interfaces to application systems based on an abstract definition of the interface required. This approach can provide higher-quality interfaces at a lower construction cost. In this paper we consider three design choices for UIMSs which critically affect the quality of the user interfaces built with a UIMS, and the cost of constructing the interfaces. The choices are examined in terms of a general model of a UIMS. They concern the sharing of control between the UIMS and the applications it provides interfaces to, the level of abstraction in the definition of the information exchanged between user and application, and the level of abstraction in the definition of the sequencing of the dialogue. For each choice, we argue for a specific alternative. We go on to present COUSIN, a UIMS that provides graphical interfaces for a variety of applications based on highly abstracted interface definitions. COUSIN's design corresponds to the alternatives we argued for in two out of three cases, and partially satisfies the third. An interface developed through, and run by COUSIN is described in some detail.

© All rights reserved Hayes et al. and/or ACM Press

1983
 
Edit | Del

Hayes, Philip J. and Szekely, Pedro (1983): Graceful Interaction Through the COUSIN Command Interface. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 19 (3) pp. 285-306.

Currently available interactive command interfaces often fail to provide adequate error correction or on-line help facilities, leading to the perception of an unfriendly interface and consequent frustration and reduced productivity on the part of the user. The COUSIN project of Carnegie-Mellon University is developing command interfaces which appear more friendly and supportive to their users, using a form-based model of communication, and incorporating error correction and on-line help. Because of the time and effort involved in constructing truly user-friendly interfaces, we are working on interface system designed to provide interfaces to many different application systems, as opposed to separate interfaces to individual applications. A COUSIN interface system gets the information it needs to provide these services for a given application from a declarative description of that application's communication needs.

© All rights reserved Hayes and Szekely and/or Academic Press

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
 
 
 

Changes to this page (author)

23 Nov 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
08 Apr 2009: Modified
08 Apr 2009: Modified
08 Apr 2009: Modified
24 Jul 2007: Modified
24 Jul 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/pedro_szekely.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1983-2012
Pub. count:24
Number of co-authors:31



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert Neches:5
Ping Luo:4
Rajiv T. Maheswaran:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Pedro Szekely's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Brad A. Myers:154
Scott E. Hudson:113
James D. Foley:49
 
 
 
Jul 30

It's all about one thing: creative problem-solving to get the story out.

-- Robert Greenberg, R/GA, 2006

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!