Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2012
Pub. count:33
Number of co-authors:29



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Ohad Inbar:6
Joachim Meyer:5
Talya Porat:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Noam Tractinsky's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jodi Forlizzi:90
Marc Hassenzahl:50
Joachim Meyer:21
 
 
 
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Noam Tractinsky

Picture of Noam Tractinsky.
Personal Homepage:
ise.bgu.ac.il/faculty/noam/noamt.html


I am an Associate Professor at the Department of Information Systems Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel. My main research interests revolve around the use of information technology. I have been involved in studies on IT project managers, online consumer behavior, the potential distraction of mobile technology, and aiding Alzheimer's patients. Currently I study various aspects of the interactive experience with an emphasis on aesthetics.

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Publications by Noam Tractinsky (bibliography)

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2012

Tractinsky, Noam (2013): Visual Aesthetics. In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at http://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html

 
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Porat, Talya and Tractinsky, Noam (2012): It's a Pleasure Buying Here: The Effects of Web-Store Design on Consumers' Emotions and Attitudes. In Eminds – International Journal of Human Computer Interaction, 27 (3) pp. 235-276

We draw on research in human-computer interaction, information systems, environmental psychology, and marketing to develop and to test a model, which suggests that salient design characteristics of the web store (aesthetics and usability) influence the emotions of visitors to the store's site, which in turn affect their attitudes toward the store. A study examined the proposed model in two e-commerce domains -- bookstores and apparel stores. The results, based on data collected from 327 participants, suggest that the effect of the design aspects on attitudes toward the store was partially mediated by affect. In addition, certain design aspects also affected attitudes directly. Specifically, effects of perceived aesthetic aspects of the online store were mainly mediated by affect. The influence of perceived usability was mainly direct and less mediated by affect. Both pleasure and arousal were associated with attitudes toward the store, with pleasure being the main mediator between store design and attitudes toward the store.

© All rights reserved Porat and Tractinsky and/or Universidad de Oviedo

2011
 
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Inbar, Ohad and Tractinsky, Noam (2011): Make a trip an experience: sharing in-car information with passengers. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1243-1248

Current in-vehicle information systems (IVIS) are designed for use by a single entity -- the driver. In this paper we propose that the benefits of IVIS can increase if we also consider the needs of passengers and their potential contribution as additional information handlers who buffer the driver from information overload. The benefits these "incidental users" of IVIS can reap from having trip-related information shared with them include reduced boredom, increased trust and a sense of inclusion. Drivers' benefits include less distraction caused by questions previously aimed at them as the exclusive owners of the trip-related information, and reduced information load by allowing passengers to actively control selected in-car systems.

© All rights reserved Inbar and Tractinsky and/or their publisher

 
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Tractinsky, Noam, Abdu, Rotem, Forlizzi, Jodi and Seder, Thomas (2011): Towards personalisation of the driver environment: investigating responses to instrument cluster design. In International Journal of Vehicle Design, 55 (2) pp. 208-236

Recent trends in the automotive and the Information Technology (IT) industries lead to growing consumer expectations for aesthetic and personalised design of products. The merging of these trends is more likely to lead to considerable changes in the driver environment. Two experiments were conducted in which we examined people's aesthetic response to the design of Instrument Clusters (ICs): the first used images of existing clusters, and the second used a set of conceptual ICs that were designed to enable the experimental control of the ICs' form and colour. The results indicate strong correlations between preferences, symbolism and attractiveness. There was no apparent trade-off between attractiveness and readability, although attractiveness was given more weight than readability in determining people's preferences. Typicality and novelty of the design were negatively correlated, and both contributed to explaining variance in aesthetic evaluations. Finally, diversity in design preferences suggests the benefits of personalised driving environment.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
 
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Tractinsky, Noam, Inbar, Ohad, Tsimhoni, Omer and Seder, Thomas (2011): Slow down, you move too fast: Examining animation aesthetics to promote eco-driving. In: 3rd International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications AutomotiveUI 2011 November 30th-December 2nd, 2011, Salzburg, Austria.

We examine how people perceive visual properties of new concepts for the design of animated vehicle instrument clusters, with emphasis on aesthetic aspects. The project is placed in the context of animations for eco-conscious driving. It consists of two stages: Creating animations and studying drivers' reactions to them. Two studies were conducted which provide various insights regarding tradeoff in the design process and drivers' preferences. The second study also serves as a first step towards th

© All rights reserved Tractinsky et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
2010
 
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Inbar, Ohad and Tractinsky, Noam (2010): Interface-to-face: sharing information with customers in service encounters. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3415-3420

Customers are often deprived of valuable information during face-to-face service encounters. We discuss such situations in the context of the "incidental user" and highlight the associated problems. A theoretical framework is proposed, according to which sharing information with customers would significantly enhance the service experience both by inspiring trust and by contributing to the effectiveness of the service encounter. We discuss possible HCI-related solutions to this challenge, including the use of a double screen approach as a means for presenting information to customers and enhancing collaboration between service providers and their customers.

© All rights reserved Inbar and Tractinsky and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Inbar, Ohad and Tractinsky, Noam (2009): The incidental user. In Interactions, 16 (4) pp. 56-59

2008
 
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Tractinsky, Noam and Shinar, David (2008): CHI'08 alt.chi / do we bump into things more while speaking on a cell phone?. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2433-2442.

We observed more than 8,800 cases of people passing by an obstacle that was placed at different heights at the entrance to a university cafeteria. Of those cases, 491 were of pedestrians speaking on a cell phone. Overall, 2,422 bumping cases were recorded. Using a cell phone while walking did not increase the risk of bumping into protruding obstacles. The results suggest that the effective visual field of people who are involved in a highly automated, relatively slow- paced task, such as walking, under low rates of information input, is not degraded by speaking on a cell phone.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and Shinar and/or ACM Press

 
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Inbar, Ohad, Ben-Asher, Noam, Porat, Talya, Mimran, Dudu, Shapira, Bracha, Shoval, Peretz, Meyer, Joachim and Tractinsky, Noam (2008): All the news that's fit to e-ink. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3621-3626.

We describe a design project of a future electronic news device and service. The project employs about 20 researchers, designers and developers. It uses advances in product technologies and in social computing to deal with the challenges of transferring the print newspaper reading experience onto a mobile, hand-held device, and of transferring the editor's power to decide what constitutes worthy news to the reader.

© All rights reserved Inbar et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Porat, Talya, Liss, Rinat and Tractinsky, Noam (2007): E-Stores Design: The Influence of E-Store Design and Product Type on Consumers' Emotions and Attitudes. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part IV 2007. pp. 712-721.

 
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Inbar, Ohad, Tractinsky, Noam and Meyer, Joachim (2007): Minimalism in information visualization: attitudes towards maximizing the data-ink ratio. In: Brinkman, Willem-Paul, Ham, Dong-Han and Wong, B. L. William (eds.) ECCE 2007 - Proceedings of the 14th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics August 28-31, 2007, London, UK. pp. 185-188.

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
2006
 
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Hassenzahl, Marc and Tractinsky, Noam (2006): User experience -- a research agenda. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 25 (2) pp. 91-97.

Over the last decade, 'user experience' (UX) became a buzzword in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) and interaction design. As technology matured, interactive products became not only more useful and usable, but also fashionable, fascinating things to desire. Driven by the impression that a narrow focus on interactive products as tools does not capture the variety and emerging aspects of technology use, practitioners and researchers alike, seem to readily embrace the notion of UX as a viable alternative to traditional HCI. And, indeed, the term promises change and a fresh look, without being too specific about its definite meaning. The present introduction to the special issue on 'Empirical studies of the user experience' attempts to give a provisional answer to the question of what is meant by 'the user experience'. It provides a cursory sketch of UX and how we think UX research will look like in the future. It is not so much meant as a forecast of the future, but as a proposal -- a stimulus for further UX research.

© All rights reserved Hassenzahl and Tractinsky and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Tractinsky, Noam, Cokhavi, Avivit, Kirschenbaum, Moti and Sharfi, Tal (2006): Evaluating the consistency of immediate aesthetic perceptions of web pages. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 64 (11) pp. 1071-1083.

Two experiments were designed to replicate and extend [Lindgaard et al.'s, 2006. Attention web designers: you have 50 ms to make a good first impression! Behaviour and Information Technology 25(2), 115-126] findings that users can form immediate aesthetic impression of web pages, and that these impressions are highly stable. Using explicit (subjective evaluations) and implicit (response latency) measures, the experiments demonstrated that, averaged over users, immediate aesthetic impressions of web pages are remarkably consistent. In Experiment 1, 40 participants evaluated 50 web pages in two phases. The average attractiveness ratings of web pages after a very short exposure of 500 ms were highly correlated with average attractiveness ratings after an exposure of 10 s. Extreme attractiveness evaluations (both positive and negative) were faster than moderate evaluations, landing convergent evidence to the hypothesis of immediate impression. The findings also suggest considerable individual differences in evaluations and in the consistency of those evaluations. In Experiment 2, 24 of the 50 web pages from Experiment 1 were evaluated again for their attractiveness after 500 ms exposure. Subsequently, users evaluated the design of the web pages on the dimensions of classical and expressive aesthetics. The results showed high correlation between attractiveness ratings from Experiments 1 and 2. In addition, it appears that low attractiveness is associated mainly with very low ratings of expressive aesthetics. Overall, the results provide direct evidence in support of the premise that aesthetic impressions of web pages are formed quickly. Indirectly, these results also suggest that visual aesthetics plays an important role in users' evaluations of the IT artifact and in their attitudes toward interactive systems.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky et al. and/or Academic Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
 
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Ben-Bassat, Tamar, Meyer, Joachim and Tractinsky, Noam (2006): Economic and subjective measures of the perceived value of aesthetics and usability. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 13 (2) pp. 210-234.

The assessment of the relative value of different design features for users is of great interest for software designers. Users' evaluations are generally measured through questionnaires. We suggest that other evaluation methods, including economic measures, may provide different estimates of the relative value of features. In a laboratory experiment we created four versions of a data-entry application by independently manipulating the system's usability and aesthetics. Users' evaluations of the four experimental systems were obtained in a within-subjects design. In addition, five between-subjects experimental conditions were created, based on the evaluation method (questionnaire alone or auction and questionnaire), monetary incentives (present or absent), and experience in using the system (present or absent). In questionnaire-based responses, the systems' usability affected evaluations of usability as well as aesthetics. Similarly, the systems' aesthetics affected evaluations of both aesthetics and usability. Questionnaire-based evaluations of usability and aesthetics were not affected by experience with the system or by monetary performance incentives. Auction bids were only influenced by the system's usability: bids corresponded to the objective performance levels that could be attained with the different systems. The results suggest that by using economic methods, researchers and practitioners can obtain system evaluations that are strongly related to performance criteria and that may be more valid when the evaluation context favors task-oriented performance.

© All rights reserved Ben-Bassat et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
 
Edit | Del

Hassenzahl, Marc and Tractinsky, Noam (2006): User experience - a research agenda. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 25 (2) pp. 91-97

Over the last decade, 'user experience' (UX) became a buzzword in the field of human computer interaction (HCI) and interaction design. As technology matured, interactive products became not only more useful and usable, but also fashionable, fascinating things to desire. Driven by the impression that a narrow focus on interactive products as tools does not capture the variety and emerging aspects of technology use, practitioners and researchers alike, seem to readily embrace the notion of UX as a viable alternative to traditional HCI. And, indeed, the term promises change and a fresh look, without being too specific about its definite meaning. The present introduction to the special issue on Empirical studies of the user experience' attempts to give a provisional answer to the question of what is meant by the user experience'. It provides a cursory sketch of UX and how we think UX research will look like in the future. It is not so much meant as a forecast of the future, but as a proposal - a stimulus for further UX research.

© All rights reserved Hassenzahl and Tractinsky and/or Taylor and Francis

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
 
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Tractinsky, Noam (2006): Aesthetics in Information Technology: Motivation and Future Research Directions. In: Zhang, Ping and Galletta, Dennis (eds.). "Human-Computer Interaction and Management Information Systems: Foundations (Advances in Management Information Systems)". M.E. Sharpe

 Cited in the following chapters:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
 
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Tractinsky, Noam and Zmiri, Dror (2006): Exploring Attributes of Skins as Potential Antecedents of Emotion in HCI. In: Fishwick, Paul A. (ed.). "Aesthetic Computing". The MIT Press

Following research on the emotional effects of physical artifacts in organizational settings, we suggest that studying emotion in the context of using interactive applications can benefit from looking at how the application is evaluated by users on three distinct attributes: instrumentality, aesthetics, and symbolism. We conducted an exploratory experiment to assess the viability of a subset of this model for the field of human-computer interaction, in the context of users’ personalization of PC-based entertainment applications. Users exhibited a variety of tastes when choosing an interface for their application. The results of closedformat and open-format questionnaires reveal that the dimensions of usability, aesthetics, and symbolism are distinct of each other. Each of these dimensions contributed to explaining users’ satisfaction and pleasant interaction experience. In line with the premises of Aesthetic Computing, the contribution of aesthetics to users' personalization of their computing environments is particularly evident

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and Zmiri and/or The MIT Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
2005
 
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Tractinsky, Noam and Hassenzahl, Marc (2005): Arguing for Aesthetics in Human-Computer Interaction. In i-com Zeitschrift für interaktive und kooperative Medien, 4 (3) p. 66–68

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
2004
 
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Lavie, Talia and Tractinsky, Noam (2004): Assessing dimensions of perceived visual aesthetics of web sites. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 60 (3) pp. 269-298.

Despite its centrality to human thought and practice, aesthetics has for the most part played a petty role in human-computer interaction research. Increasingly, however, researchers attempt to strike a balance between the traditional concerns of human-computer interaction and considerations of aesthetics. Thus, recent research suggests that the visual aesthetics of computer interfaces is a strong determinant of users' satisfaction and pleasure. However, the lack of appropriate concepts and measures of aesthetics may severely constraint future research in this area. To address this issue, we conducted four studies in order to develop a measurement instrument of perceived web site aesthetics. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses we found that users' perceptions consist of two main dimensions, which we termed "classical aesthetics" and "expressive aesthetics". The classical aesthetics dimension pertains to aesthetic notions that presided from antiquity until the 18th century. These notions emphasize orderly and clear design and are closely related to many of the design rules advocated by usability experts. The expressive aesthetics dimension is manifested by the designers' creativity and originality and by the ability to break design conventions. While both dimensions of perceived aesthetic are drawn from a pool of aesthetic judgments, they are clearly distinguishable from each other. Each of the aesthetic dimensions is measured by a five-item scale. The reliabilities, factor structure and validity tests indicate that these items reflect the two perceived aesthetics dimensions adequately.

© All rights reserved Lavie and Tractinsky and/or Academic Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
 
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Tractinsky, Noam (2004): Tools over solutions? comments on Interacting with Computers special issue on affective computing. In Interacting with Computers, 16 (4) pp. 751-757.

The emotional system is highly sensitive to individual, cultural and contextual differences. This creates difficulties in studying and designing affect in HCI. It is hard to see how grand visions of affective HCI survive the harsh complexity and intricacy of human emotions. Perhaps a more realistic approach to accommodating users' affective needs is to design interactive technologies that would help users help themselves. Users can stay in full control, being allowed to personalize and tailor applications in a way that satisfies, mitigates, or enhances various emotional states or needs.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Tractinsky, Noam (2004): A Few Notes on the Study of Beauty in HCI. In Human-Computer Interaction, 19 (4) pp. 351-357.

 
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Tractinsky, Noam (2004): Toward the study of aesthetics in information technology. In: Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Information Systems December 12-15, 2004, Washington, DC, USA. pp. 771-780

This paper argues that an increasingly important dimension of the human-computer interaction is missing from the MIS and the HCI research agenda. This dimension—esthetics—plays a major role in our private, social, and business lives. It is argued that aesthetics is relevant to information technology research and practice for three theoretical reasons. (1) For many users, other aspects of the interaction hardly matter anymore. (2) Our evaluations of the environment are primarily visual, and the environment becomes increasingly replete with information technology. (3) Aesthetics satisfies basic human needs, and human needs are increasingly supplied by information technology. Aesthetics matters for a practical reason as well: it is here to stay. We propose a general framework for the study of aesthetics in information technology and provide some examples of research questions to illustrate the viability of this topic.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and/or his/her publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
 
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Tractinsky, Noam (2004): Toward the Study of Aesthetics in Information Technology. In: Proceedings from the 25th Annual International Conference on Information Systems December 9-12, 2004, Washington, USA. pp. 12-15

This paper argues that an increasingly important dimension of the human-computer interaction is missing from the MIS and the HCI research agenda. This dimension—esthetics—plays a major role in our private, social, and business lives. It is argued that aesthetics is relevant to information technology research and practice for three theoretical reasons. (1) For many users, other aspects of the interaction hardly matter anymore. (2) Our evaluations of the environment are primarily visual, and the environment becomes increasingly replete with information technology. (3) Aesthetics satisfies basic human needs, and human needs are increasingly supplied by information technology. Aesthetics matters for a practical reason as well: it is here to stay. We propose a general framework for the study of aesthetics in information technology and provide some examples of research questions to illustrate the viability of this topic.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and/or his/her publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
2003
 
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Gefen, David, Rao, V. Srinivasan and Tractinsky, Noam (2003): The Conceptualization of Trust, Risk and Their Relationship in Electronic Commerce: The Need for Clarifications. In: HICSS 2003 2003. p. 192.

2001
 
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Tractinsky, Noam and Meyer, Joachim (2001): Task structure and the apparent duration of hierarchical search. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 55 (5) pp. 845-860.

Research in the area of human-computer interaction (HCI) suggests that long or variable system delays lower user satisfaction with the interaction and the system in general. Designers cannot always control the delays in a system's responses (e.g. when accessing remote servers), but it is possible to design human-computer interactions so that the apparent duration of intervals will seem minimal. One way of achieving this goal is to structure tasks so that their apparent duration is reduced, partly by altering the number of choices and actions required for performing the task. Two laboratory experiments assessed the effects of the number of choices and the number of ballistic (simple) steps in a menu search on the apparent duration of the search. Results showed that the apparent duration increased with an increasing number of ballistic steps, while the number of choices had no effect on estimates. However, apparent durations were the shortest when the ratio of choices to ballistic steps was maximized. The implications of these findings for interface design are discussed.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and Meyer and/or Academic Press

2000
 
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Tractinsky, Noam (2000): A Theoretical Framework and Empirical Examination of the Effects of Foreign and Translated Interface Language. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 19 (1) pp. 1-13.

Given the increased globalization and popularization of computer applications, translating a system's human interface into the local language has become a major consideration for software vendors and distributors. In this paper, we suggest a theoretical framework for the study of user interface translation. The framework includes recognizing vendors' and users' costs of, and benefits from, software translation. An experiment was conducted, based on this framework, to test user performance and preferences regarding interface translations. The experiment manipulated the translation of two interface components: documentation language and manipulation language. The results indicate that users are sensitive to different combinations of interface translation in a way that is commensurate with the instruction-following process (Terwilliger and Polson 1997). Users performed best when a fully translated interface was used and worst when only the manipulation language was translated. Users' preferences were in line with their performance, indicating that a cost benefit approach can serve as a promising starting point to the study of interface translation.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Tractinsky, Noam, Katz, A. S. and Ikar, D. (2000): What is Beautiful is Usable. In Interacting with Computers, 13 (2) pp. 127-145.

An experiment was conducted to test the relationships between users' perceptions of a computerized system's beauty and usability. The experiment used a computerized application as a surrogate for an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Perceptions were elicited before and after the participants used the system. Pre-experimental measures indicate strong correlations between system's perceived aesthetics and perceived usability. Post-experimental measures indicated that the strong correlation remained intact. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that the degree of system's aesthetics affected the post-use perceptions of both aesthetics and usability, whereas the degree of actual usability had no such effect. The results resemble those found by social psychologists regarding the effect of physical attractiveness on the valuation of other personality attributes. The findings stress the importance of studying the aesthetic aspect of human-computer interaction (HCI) design and its relationships to other design dimensions.

© All rights reserved Tractinsky et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 Cited in the following chapters:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]

Aesthetic Computing: [/encyclopedia/aesthetic_computing.html]


 
 
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Jarvenpaa, Sirkka L., Tractinsky, Noam and Vitale, Michael (2000): Consumer trust in an Internet store. In Information Technology and Management, 1 (2) pp. 45-71

The study reported here raises some questions about the conventional wisdom that the Internet creates a “level playing field” for large and small retailers and for retailers with and without an established reputation. In our study, consumers recognized differences in size and reputation among Internet stores, and those differences influenced their assessments of store trustworthiness and their perception of risk, as well as their willingness to patronize the store. After describing our research methods and results, we draw some implications for Internet merchants.

© All rights reserved Jarvenpaa et al. and/or Springer

 Cited in the following chapter:

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
1999
 
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Jarvenpaa, Sirkka L., Tractinsky, Noam and Saarinen, Lauri (1999): Consumer Trust in an Internet Store: A Cross-Cultural Validation. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 5 (2) .

 Cited in the following chapter:

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
 
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Tractinsky, Noam and Meyer, Joachim (1999): Junkchart or Goldgraph? Effects of Presentation Objectives and Content Desirability on Information Presentation. In MIS Quarterly, 23 pp. 397-420

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
1997
 
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Tractinsky, Noam (1997): Aesthetics and apparent usability: empirically assessing cultural and methodological issues. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems 1997. pp. 115-122

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
1992
 
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Vessey, Iris, Jarvenpaa, Sirkka L. and Tractinsky, Noam (1992): Evaluating of Vendor Products: CASE Tools as Methodology Companions. In Communications of the ACM, 35 (4) pp. 90-105.

1989
 
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Rafaeli, Sheizaf and Tractinsky, Noam (1989): Computerized Tests and Time: Measuring, Limiting and Providing Visual Cues for Response Time in On-Line Questioning. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 8 (5) pp. 335-351.

It is possible and attractive to incorporate time-related measures and techniques in on-line computerized testing systems. However, is it advisable? This study focuses on the measurement of response time, the solicitation of speed, the limitation of allotted time and the provision of on-line visual cues for the passage of time (on-screen hourglass). An experiment was conducted using a standard general knowledge component of a psychometric test; 198 students completed an on-line psychometric test under several time-related experimental conditions. Findings encourage further use of time-related techniques. Positive correlations were found between performance as measured by accuracy in response and speed measures. Time-limiting procedures allowed savings of almost 50% of examinee and examiner's time, without diminishing score reliability. The reliability of the speed measures is at least as high as the reliability of accuracy measures. Examinees' stress was not affected, but intersubjection attitudes are a problem for the incorporation of time-related measures. Finally, while accuracy scores are biased by demographics, speed measures seem to be independent of experience in using computers, gender, age and education.

© All rights reserved Rafaeli and Tractinsky and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/noam_tractinsky.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2012
Pub. count:33
Number of co-authors:29



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Ohad Inbar:6
Joachim Meyer:5
Talya Porat:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Noam Tractinsky's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jodi Forlizzi:90
Marc Hassenzahl:50
Joachim Meyer:21
 
 
 
Jul 26

The display is the computer.

-- Jen-Hsun Huang, 2002

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

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