Publication statistics

Pub. period:1985-1998
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:1



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Chris A. Thyberg:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Nathaniel S. Borenstein's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Chris A. Thyberg:2
 
 
 

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Nathaniel S. Borenstein

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Publications by Nathaniel S. Borenstein (bibliography)

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1998
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1998): Whose Net Is It Anyway?. In Communications of the ACM, 41 (4) pp. 19-21.

1996
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1996): Perils and Pitfalls of Practical Cybercommerce. In Communications of the ACM, 39 (6) pp. 36-44.

 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1996): CMU's Andrew Project: A Retrospective. In Communications of the ACM, 39 (12) pp. 298-311.

1992
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1992): Computational Mail as Network Infrastructure for Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. In: Proceedings of the 1992 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work November 01 - 04, 1992, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 67-74.

Computational email -- the embedding of programs within electronic mail messages -- is proposed as a technology that may help to solve some of the key problems in deploying successful applications for computer-supported cooperative work. In particular, computational email promises to alleviate the problem of remote installation at separately-administered sites, the problem of getting users to "buy in" to new applications, and the problem of extremely heterogeneous user interaction environments. In order for computational email to be practical, however, key problems of security and portability must be addressed, problems for which this research offers new solutions. This paper outlines the promise of this new technology, the solutions to the key technical problems, and the areas where further work and application development are needed.

© All rights reserved Borenstein and/or ACM Press

 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1992): Programming as if People Mattered: Friendly Programs, Software Engineering, and Other Noble Delusions. Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press

1991
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. and Thyberg, Chris A. (1991): Power, Ease of Use and Cooperative Work in a Practical Multimedia Message System. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 34 (2) pp. 229-259.

The "Messages" program, the high-end interface to the Andrew Message System (AMS), is a multimedia mail and bulletin board reading program that novices generally learn to use in less than an hour. Despite the initial simplicity, however, Messages is extremely powerful and manages to satisfy the needs of both experts and novices through a carefully evolved system of novice-oriented defaults, expert-oriented options, and a help system and option-setting facility designed to ease the transition from new user to sophisticated expert. The advanced features of the system facilitate types of cooperative work that are not possible with other mail or bulletin board systems, but which would also be impossible in large heterogeneous communities if the system were not so easily used by both novices and experts. A major example of such cooperative work is the Andrew Advisor system, a highly-evolved and sophisticated system that uses the AMS to solve the problems of distributed support for a very diverse user community in a heterogeneous computing environment. The evolution of the Advisor system and its uses of the AMS mechanisms are considered as a detailed example of the power and limitations of the AMS.

© All rights reserved Borenstein and Thyberg and/or Academic Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

Socio-Technical System Design: [/encyclopedia/socio-technical_system_design.html]

The Evolution of Computing: [/books/the_social_design_of_technical_systems/the_evolution_of_computing.html]


 
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1991): Multimedia Electronic Mail: Will the Dream Become a Reality?. In Communications of the ACM, 34 (4) pp. 117-119.

1988
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. and Thyberg, Chris A. (1988): Cooperative Work in the Andrew Message System. In: Greif, Irene (ed.) Proceedings of the 1988 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work September 26 - 28, 1988, Portland, Oregon, United States. pp. 306-323.

The Andrew Message System, a distributed system for multi-media electronic communication, has a number of special features that support cooperative work. After a brief discussion of the system itself, these features are described and discussed in more detail. Examples of how organizations actually use these features are then presented and discussed, with particular attention paid to the "Advisor" system for electronic consulting.

© All rights reserved Borenstein and Thyberg and/or ACM Press

 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1988): UNIX Emacs: A Retrospective Lessons for Flexible System Design. In: Green, Mark (ed.) Proceedings of the 1st annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User Interface Software October 17 - 19, 1988, Alberta, Canada. pp. 95-101.

UNIX Emacs is well-known and widely used as a text editor that has been extended in a remarkable number of directions, not always wisely. Because it is programmable in a powerful yet simple programming language, Emacs has been used as a development tool for the construction of some remarkably complex user-oriented programs. Indeed, it has served as both a user interface management system and a user interface toolkit, though it was designed as neither. In this paper, we discuss the features that have made it so popular for user interface development, in an attempt to derive lessons of value for more powerful and more systematically designed systems in the future.

© All rights reserved Borenstein and/or ACM Press

1985
 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1985): The Evaluation of Text Editors: A Critical Review of the Roberts and Moran Methodology Based on New Experiments. In: Borman, Lorraine and Curtis, Bill (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 85 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1985, San Francisco, California. pp. 99-105.

Three text editors were studied using the editor evaluation methodology developed by Roberts and Moran [3,4]. The results are presented as an extension of the studies by Roberts and Moran, with comparisons to the editors they studied earlier. In addition, supplementary measurements were taken that suggest minor flaws in the Roberts and Moran methodology. Further problems with the methodology are discussed, with an eye toward improving the methodology for future use. Although three significant problems with the methodology are reported, the problems are interesting primarily as lessons for the design of future evaluation methodologies. The Roberts and Moran methodology remains largely useful for the purposes for which it was designed.

© All rights reserved Borenstein and/or ACM Press

 
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Borenstein, Nathaniel S. (1985): Help Texts vs. Help Mechanisms: A New Mandate for Documentation Writers. In: ACM Fourth International Conference on Systems Documentation 1985. pp. 78-83.

To compare different methods of accessing and presenting on-line help, controlled experiments were conducted. Several different help systems were compared, including a natural language help system and a human tutor. The results indicate that, while varying the help mechanism may have some effect on learning, its importance is greatly overshadowed by the simple quality of the help texts being presented. Even for on-line help, good writing seems to be the most important part of helping the user, far more important than elaborate or sophisticated mechanisms.

© All rights reserved Borenstein and/or ACM Press

 
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17 Aug 2009: Modified
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/nathaniel_s__borenstein.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1985-1998
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:1



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Chris A. Thyberg:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Nathaniel S. Borenstein's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Chris A. Thyberg:2
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
91% booked. Starts in 4 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
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Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading