Publication statistics

Pub. period:2007-2012
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:16



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert J. K. Jacob:5
Erin Treacy Solovey:3
Zeina Atrash Leong:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Michael S. Horn's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Robert J. K. Jacob:57
Chia Shen:46
Daniel Wigdor:37
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
Affordances: Designing Intuitive User Interfaces
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Michael S. Horn

 

Publications by Michael S. Horn (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Block, Florian, Wigdor, Daniel, Phillips, Brenda Caldwell, Horn, Michael S. and Shen, Chia (2012): FlowBlocks: a multi-touch ui for crowd interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 497-508. Available online

Multi-touch technology lends itself to collaborative crowd interaction (CI). However, common tap-operated widgets are impractical for CI, since they are susceptible to accidental touches and interference from other users. We present a novel multi-touch interface called FlowBlocks in which every UI action is invoked through a small sequence of user actions: dragging parametric UI-Blocks, and dropping them over operational UI-Docks. The FlowBlocks approach is advantageous for CI because it a) makes accidental touches inconsequential; and b) introduces design parameters for mutual awareness, concurrent input, and conflict management. FlowBlocks was successfully used on the floor of a busy natural history museum. We present the complete design space and describe a year-long iterative design and evaluation process which employed the Rapid Iterative Test and Evaluation (RITE) method in a museum setting.

© All rights reserved Block et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Horn, Michael S., Davis, Pryce, Hubbard, Aleata K., Keifert, Danielle, Leong, Zeina Atrash and Olson, Izabel C. (2011): Learning sustainability: families, learning, and next-generation eco-feedback technology. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC11 Interaction Design and Children 2011. pp. 161-164. Available online

Eco-feedback technology is a growing area of interest in interaction design research. From smart meters to ambient feedback displays, well-designed technology has the potential to help families cut costs, reduce waste, and increase environmental sustainability. In this paper, we reflect on this trend and pose two interrelated design challenges that we believe are important for the development and evaluation of next-generation eco-feedback technology. First, how can we design technology to encourage entire families, children as well as adults, to become meaningful and active participants in the management of household resource consumption? And second, how can we design interactive systems to engage families in inquiry-based learning around concepts of consumption and sustainability?

© All rights reserved Horn et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Leong, Zeina Atrash and Horn, Michael S. (2011): Representing equality: a tangible balance beam for early algebra education. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC11 Interaction Design and Children 2011. pp. 173-176. Available online

In this paper we describe the design and implementation of a tangible balance beam that we created for early algebra education. We also present data from an exploratory study with seven children (ages 9-10 years) in a local elementary summer school classroom. Our results provide insight into how students solve algebra problems using our tangible interface, how they coordinate multiple representations (both digital and physical) in the problem solving process, and how they understand the concept of algebraic equality in this context. The data suggests that our interface helps students think about equations in a relational context, which has been shown to be an important skill for understanding more advanced concepts in algebra. Whether or not the combination of physical and digital representations provided by our interface helps students apply this relational understanding to equations written using standard algebraic notation is an open question that we hope to investigate in future work.

© All rights reserved Leong and Horn and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Olson, Izabel C. and Horn, Michael S. (2011): Modeling on the table: agent-based modeling in elementary school with NetTango. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC11 Interaction Design and Children 2011. pp. 189-192. Available online

In this paper we describe NetTango, an agent-based modeling environment designed for elementary school students to use on a multi-touch tabletop surface. We review literature on the use of interactive tabletops for learning and present examples from an exploratory study that we conducted with 28 children (ages 6-10). We also discuss two design challenges that emerged during our study and consider possible solutions.

© All rights reserved Olson and Horn and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Leong, Zeina Atrash and Horn, Michael S. (2010): The BEAM: a digitally enhanced balance beam for mathematics education. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 290-292. Available online

In this demo we present the BEAM, a tangible user interface designed to help teach mathematical concepts. This research considers the role of Montessori pedagogy and traditions in the design of new, digitally enhanced educational manipulative materials.

© All rights reserved Leong and Horn and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Horn, Michael S., Solovey, Erin Treacy, Crouser, R. Jordan and Jacob, Robert J. K. (2009): Comparing the use of tangible and graphical programming languages for informal science education. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 975-984. Available online

Much of the work done in the field of tangible interaction has focused on creating tools for learning; however, in many cases, little evidence has been provided that tangible interfaces offer educational benefits compared to more conventional interaction techniques. In this paper, we present a study comparing the use of a tangible and a graphical interface as part of an interactive computer programming and robotics exhibit that we designed for the Boston Museum of Science. In this study, we have collected observations of 260 museum visitors and conducted interviews with 13 family groups. Our results show that visitors found the tangible and the graphical systems equally easy to understand. However, with the tangible interface, visitors were significantly more likely to try the exhibit and significantly more likely to actively participate in groups. In turn, we show that regardless of the condition, involving multiple active participants leads to significantly longer interaction times. Finally, we examine the role of children and adults in each condition and present evidence that children are more actively involved in the tangible condition, an effect that seems to be especially strong for girls.

© All rights reserved Horn et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
Edit | Del

Jacob, Robert J. K., Girouard, Audrey, Hirshfield, Leanne M., Horn, Michael S., Shaer, Orit, Solovey, Erin Treacy and Zigelbaum, Jamie (2008): Reality-based interaction: a framework for post-WIMP interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 201-210. Available online

We are in the midst of an explosion of emerging human-computer interaction techniques that redefine our understanding of both computers and interaction. We propose the notion of Reality-Based Interaction (RBI) as a unifying concept that ties together a large subset of these emerging interaction styles. Based on this concept of RBI, we provide a framework that can be used to understand, compare, and relate current paths of recent HCI research as well as to analyze specific interaction designs. We believe that viewing interaction through the lens of RBI provides insights for design and uncovers gaps or opportunities for future research.

© All rights reserved Jacob et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Horn, Michael S. (2008): Tangible computer programming for informal science learning. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 21-24. Available online

The goal of this project is to develop a tangible programming language for use in informal science learning and to evaluate its effectiveness. As part of this effort, we will explore the relative strengths and weaknesses of tangible and graphical interaction for this task in the context of an exhibit on robotics on display at the Boston Museum of Science. We hypothesize that a tangible programming language will be practical for use in informal science settings and will offer significant advantages in terms of learning and quality of interaction.

© All rights reserved Horn and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Horn, Michael S., Solovey, Erin Treacy and Jacob, Robert J. K. (2008): Tangible programming and informal science learning: making TUIs work for museums. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 194-201. Available online

In this paper we describe the design and initial evaluation of a tangible computer programming exhibit for children on display at the Boston Museum of Science. We also discuss five design considerations for tangible interfaces in science museums that guided our development and evaluation. In doing so, we propose the notion of passive tangible interfaces. Passive tangibles serve as a way to address practical issues involving tangible interaction in public settings and as a design strategy to promote reflective thinking. Results from our evaluation indicate that passive tangibles can preserve many of the benefits of tangible interaction for informal science learning while remaining cost-effective and reliable.

© All rights reserved Horn et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
Edit | Del

Zigelbaum, Jamie, Horn, Michael S., Shaer, Orit and Jacob, Robert J. K. (2007): The tangible video editor: collaborative video editing with active tokens. In: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2007. pp. 43-46. Available online

In this paper we introduce the Tangible Video Editor (TVE), a multi-user, tangible interface for sequencing digital video. We present a new approach to tabletop interaction by using multiple handheld computers embedded in plastic tokens. Drawing from the rich physical experience of tradition film editing techniques we designed the TVE to engage multiple users in a collaborative process and encourage the exploration of narrative ideas. We used active tokens to provide a malleable interface, enabling users to organize the interface components in unspecified ways. Our implementation improves upon common projection-based tabletop interfaces in a number of ways including a design for use beyond dedicated two dimensional spaces and a naturally scaling screen resolution.

© All rights reserved Zigelbaum et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Horn, Michael S. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (2007): Designing tangible programming languages for classroom use. In: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2007. pp. 159-162. Available online

This paper describes a new technique for implementing educational programming languages using tangible interface technology. It emphasizes the use of inexpensive and durable parts with no embedded electronics or power supplies. Students create programs in offline settings -- on their desks or on the floor -- and use a portable scanning station to compile their code. We argue that languages created with this approach offer an appealing and practical alternative to text-based and visual languages for classroom use. In this paper we discuss the motivations for our project and describe the design and implementation of two tangible programming languages. We also describe an initial case study with children and outline future research goals.

© All rights reserved Horn and Jacob and/or ACM Press

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/michael_s__horn.html