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Marvin M. Theimer

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Publications by Marvin M. Theimer (bibliography)

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1997
 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Mynatt, Elizabeth D., Petersen, Karin, Spreitzer, Mike J., Terry, Douglas B. and Theimer, Marvin M. (1997): Designing and Implementing Asynchronous Collaborative Applications with Bayou. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 119-128.

Asynchronous collaboration is characterized by the degree of independence collaborators have from one another. In particular, collaborators working asynchronously typically have little need for frequent and fine-grained coordination with one another, and typically do not need to be notified immediately of changes made by others to any shared artifacts they are working with. We present an infrastructure, called Bayou, designed to support the construction of asynchronous collaborative applications. Bayou provides a replicated, weakly-consistent, data storage engine to application writers. The system supports a number of mechanisms for leveraging application semantics; using these mechanisms, applications can implement complex conflict detection and resolution policies, and choose the level of consistency and stability they will see in their databases. We present a number of applications we have built or are building using the Bayou system, and examine how these take advantage of the Bayou architecture.

© All rights reserved Edwards et al. and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Schilit, Bill N. and Theimer, Marvin M. (1994): Disseminating active map information to mobile hosts. In IEEE Network, 8 (5) pp. 22-32.

Mobile computing di ers from desk-top computing because of the dynamic nature of system state: as users move, the sets of stationary and mobile objects they control and the types of information they wish to access change. Navigating a mobile environment can be aided by active maps that describe the location and characteristics of objects within some region as they change over time. We describe an active map service that keeps clients informed of changes in their environment. The primary issue driving our design is the question of scale: an active map service must be able to handle updates and queries over suciently large regions of space to satisfy clients' interests and must be able to handle peak loads that can occur when everyone in a region is moving around, for example, to attend a meeting. Our solution detects sets of clients that wish to receive the same active map information and then dynamically assigns multicast groups to them. To guarantee clients that they and their communication links will not be overloaded the active map provides guaranteed limits on bandwidth use.

© All rights reserved Schilit and Theimer and/or IEEE Communications Society

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
1991
 
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Pier, Ken, Newman, William M., Redell, David, Schmandt, Chris, Theimer, Marvin M. and Want, Roy (1991): Locator Technology in Distributed Systems: The Active Badge. In: Jong, Peter de (ed.) Proceedings of the Conference on Organizational Computing Systems 1991 November 6-8, 1991, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 285-287.

Experiments with technology for locating and tracking people and things are occurring in computer science research centers in Europe and the United States. Although in its early stages, this location capability is viewed as an enabler for next-generation distributed computing systems in offices, universities, and perhaps the wider world. Such systems will no longer shackle users to their desktop PC or leave them stranded, unconnected, when using portable and notebook systems. Instead, ubiquitous wireless networks will track users and machines, delivering information and services as needed to people on the go [SciAm91]. The first of these locator technologies is called the Active Badge. Originated by Dr. Roy Want at the Olivetti Cambridge Research Lab, active badge networks are now installed at six sites [Sites]. These badges, worn in the workplace much like common corporate ID badges, use infrared technology to broadcast unique IDs to a simple network of sensors installed in laboratory spaces. The sensor network elements are polled by a central location service. Clients of that service can correlate sensor number with physical location and, for example, frequently update a location data base that is available to still other client programs. Locator technology raises a number of important questions, some of which are addressed by this panel. From the technology side, one might ask how these systems work, what other implementations are possible, and how should locator technology evolve and interact with other technologies in coming systems. Perhaps even more important are the sociological and ethical questions raised by locator capability. Will "Big Brother" monitor your every move? Must you wear an active badge to get your work done? Can you drop-in and drop-out of the location system as you wish? Can we architect systems that provide desirable services without actually revealing any individual's location and trail unless given permission by that individual? Some of these issues and some systems already in place will be discussed by our panelists.

© All rights reserved Pier et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

09 Nov 2012: Added
28 Apr 2003: Added

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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/marvin_m__theimer.html
Jul 11

Creative without strategy is called ‘art‘. Creative with strategy is called ‘advertising‘

-- Jef I. Richards

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!