Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:31
Number of co-authors:80



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

W. Keith Edwards:11
Mark S. Ackerman:7
Jana Z. Sedivy:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark W. Newman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Anind K. Dey:71
Mark S. Ackerman:67
 
 
 

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Mark W. Newman

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Personal Homepage:
mwnewman.people.si.umich.edu/

I am an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of Michigan. My research interests lie broadly in the field of human-computer interaction, and particularly in the areas of ubiquitous computing and end-user programming. Prior to the Summer of 2007, I was a research scientist at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC, formerly known as Xerox PARC) and a doctoral candidate in Computer Science at UC Berkeley.

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Publications by Mark W. Newman (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Dong, Tao, Ackerman, Mark S. and Newman, Mark W. (2012): Social overlays: augmenting existing UIs with social cues. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 79-82.

Social Overlays is a novel toolkit that provides a generalized mechanism for implementing socially-based help on the Web without requiring access to the source code for the target application. As such, third-party developers can use Social Overlays to augment any existing web-based UI with a variety of social navigation cues. We demonstrate the capability of Social Overlays through an example application augmenting the standard PHP configuration page.

© All rights reserved Dong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Chang, Yung-Ju and Newman, Mark W. (2012): Understanding how trace segmentation impacts transportation mode detection. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 625-626.

Transportation mode (TM) detection is one of the activity recognition tasks in ubiquitous computing. A number of previous studies have compared the performance of various classifiers for TM detection. However, the current study is the first work aiming to understand how TM detection performance is impacted by how the recorded location traces are segmented into data segments for training a classifier. In our preliminary experiments we examine three trace segmentation (TS) methods -- Uniform Duration (UniDur), Uniform Number of Location Points (UniNP), and Uniform Distance (UniDis) -- and compare their performance on detecting different transportation modes. The results indicate that while driving can be more accurately detected by using UniDis method, walking and bus can be more accurately detected by using UniDur method. This suggests that choosing a right TS method for training a TM classifier is an important step to accurately detect particular transportation modes.

© All rights reserved Chang and Newman and/or ACM Press

 
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Yang, Rayoung and Newman, Mark W. (2012): Living with an intelligent thermostat: advanced control for heating and cooling systems. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 1102-1107.

In order to better understand the opportunities and challenges of an intelligent system in the home, we studied the lived experience of a thermostat, the Nest. The Nest utilizes machine learning, sensing, and networking technology, as well as eco-feedback features. To date, we have conducted six interviews and one diary study. Our findings show that improved interfaces through web and mobile applications changed the interactions between users and their home system. Intelligibility and accuracy of the machine learning and sensing technology influenced the way participants perceive and adapt to the system. The convenient control over the system combined with limitations of the technology may have prevented the desired energy savings. These findings assert that thoughtful, continuous involvement from users is critical to the desired system performance and the success of interventions to promote sustainable choices. We suggest that an intelligent system in the home requires improved intelligibility and a better way in which users can provide deliberate input to the system.

© All rights reserved Yang and Newman and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Newman, Mark W., Lauterbach, Debra, Munson, Sean A., Resnick, Paul and Morris, Margaret E. (2011): It's not that I don't have problems, I'm just not putting them on Facebook: challenges and opportunities in using online social networks for health. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 341-350.

To understand why and how people share health information online, we interviewed fourteen people with significant health concerns who participate in both online health communities and Facebook. Qualitative analysis of these interviews highlighted the ways that people think about with whom and how to share different types of information as they pursue social goals related to their personal health, including emotional support, motivation, accountability, and advice. Our study suggests that success in these goals depends on how well they develop their social networks and how effectively they communicate within those networks. Effective communication is made more challenging by the need to strike a balance between sharing information related to specific needs and the desire to manage self-presentation. Based on these observations, we outline a set of design opportunities for future systems to support health-oriented social interactions online, including tools to help users shape their social networks and communicate effectively within those.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Huh, Jina, Newman, Mark W. and Ackerman, Mark S. (2011): Supporting collaborative help for individualized use. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3141-3150.

In this paper, we seek to advance the research around utilizing collaborative help for supporting individualized use of technologies. We do this by shedding light on the ways that users of MythTV, a highly flexible open-source software system for home entertainment enthusiasts, collaboratively help one another in maintaining their individualized MythTV systems. By analyzing the MythTV user community's mailing list archive, documentation, and wiki, coupled with user interviews we discuss how the community utilizes configuration artifacts as proxies to easily mobilize and exchange knowledge. While exchanging concrete artifacts such as scripts and configuration files was seen to sometimes increase the efficiency of knowledge transfer, it also presented several challenges. Negotiating the transparency of configuration artifacts, navigating the customization and appropriation gulfs, and aligning usage trajectories all emerged as problematic areas. We discuss design implications that address these challenges. Our findings provide a crucial understanding for how to support users in their individualized use of systems.

© All rights reserved Huh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yang, Rayoung, Park, Sangmi, Mishra, Sonali R., Hong, Zhenan, Newsom, Clint, Joo, Hyeon, Hofer, Erik and Newman, Mark W. (2011): Supporting spatial awareness and independent wayfinding for pedestrians with visual impairments. In: Thirteenth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2011. pp. 27-34.

Much of the information designed to help people navigate the built environment is conveyed through visual channels, which means it is not accessible to people with visual impairments. Due to this limitation, travelers with visual impairments often have difficulty navigating and discovering locations in unfamiliar environments, which reduces their sense of independence with respect to traveling by foot. In this paper, we examine how mobile location-based computing systems can be used to increase the feeling of independence in travelers with visual impairments. A set of formative interviews with people with visual impairments showed that increasing one's general spatial awareness is the key to greater independence. This insight guided the design of Talking Points 3 (TP3), a mobile location-aware system for people with visual impairments that seeks to increase the legibility of the environment for its users in order to facilitate navigating to desired locations, exploration, serendipitous discovery, and improvisation. We conducted studies with eight legally blind participants in three campus buildings in order to explore how and to what extent TP3 helps promote spatial awareness for its users. The results shed light on how TP3 helped users find destinations in unfamiliar environments, but also allowed them to discover new points of interest, improvise solutions to problems encountered, develop personalized strategies for navigating, and, in general, enjoy a greater sense of independence.

© All rights reserved Yang et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Newman, Mark W. and Poole, Erika Shehan (2010): The infrastructure problem in HCI. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 423-432.

HCI endeavors to create human-centered computer systems, but underlying technological infrastructures often stymie these efforts. We outline three specific classes of user experience difficulties caused by underlying technical infrastructures, which we term constrained possibilities, unmediated interaction, and interjected abstractions. We explore how prior approaches in HCI have addressed these issues, and discuss new approaches that will be required for future progress. We argue that the HCI community must become more deeply involved with the creation of technical infrastructures. Doing so, however, requires a substantial expansion to the methodological toolbox of HCI.

© All rights reserved Edwards et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Newman, Mark W., Ackerman, Mark S., Kim, Jungwoo, Prakash, Atul, Hong, Zhenan, Mandel, Jacob and Dong, Tao (2010): Bringing the field into the lab: supporting capture and replay of contextual data for the design of context-aware applications. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 105-108.

When designing context-aware applications, it is difficult to for designers in the studio or lab to envision the contextual conditions that will be encountered at runtime. Designers need a tool that can create/re-create naturalistic contextual states and transitions, so that they can evaluate an application under expected contexts. We have designed and developed RePlay: a system for capturing and playing back sensor traces representing scenarios of use. RePlay contributes to research on ubicomp design tools by embodying a structured approach to the capture and playback of contextual data. In particular, RePlay supports: capturing naturalistic data through Capture Probes, encapsulating scenarios of use through Episodes, and supporting exploratory manipulation of scenarios through Transforms. Our experiences using RePlay in internal design projects illustrate its potential benefits for ubicomp design.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Huh, Jina, Ackerman, Mark S., Newman, Mark W. and Buyuktur, Ayse G. (2010): Progressive scenarios: a rapid method for understanding user interpretations of technology. In: GROUP10 International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2010. pp. 31-34.

For emerging group technologies that require evaluations on long-term use and social norms, assumptions, and implicit rules that develop around the technologies, standard usability testing may not be adequate. At the same time, field based research that allows for observing technology use over long-term is costly in terms of time. In this paper, we present a rapid method that we call progressive scenarios, which could help replicate the processes by which interpretations evolve over time in natural settings and how invisible assumptions and social norms dictate the technology use. Using a preliminary design concept of a publicly available ambient personal information and communication system, we demonstrate how the method helped to elicit design implications.

© All rights reserved Huh et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Lee, David, Munson, Sean A., Congleton, Ben, Newman, Mark W., Ackerman, Mark S., Hofer, Erik C. and Finholt, Thomas A. (2009): Montage: a platform for physically navigating multiple pages of web content. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4477-4482.

Montage is a platform for rendering multiple pages of web content on large tiled displays (several desktop LCDs arranged in a spatially contiguous matrix). We discuss the advantages of data visualization using a newsstand metaphor, showing many content items at once and allowing users to quickly refine visual searches by walking (physically navigating) closer to specific data on the display. We have used Montage to build three applications that demonstrate the variety of applications that are possible on this platform. These applications have benefits for both everyday use and as research tools.

© All rights reserved Lee et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Newman, Mark W., Sedivy, Jana Z. and Smith, Trevor F. (2009): Experiences with recombinant computing: Exploring ad hoc interoperability in evolving digital networks. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 16 (1) p. 3.

This article describes an infrastructure that supports the creation of interoperable systems while requiring only limited prior agreements about the specific forms of communication between these systems. Conceptually, our approach uses a set of "meta-interfaces" -- agreements on how to exchange new behaviors necessary to achieve compatibility at runtime, rather than requiring that communication specifics be built in at development time -- to allow devices on the network to interact with one another. While this approach to interoperability can remove many of the system-imposed constraints that prevent fluid, ad hoc use of devices now, it imposes its own limitations on the user experience of systems that use it. Most importantly, since devices may be expected to work with peers about which they have no detailed semantic knowledge, it is impossible to achieve the sort of tight semantic integration that can be obtained using other approaches today, despite the fact that these other approaches limit interoperability. Instead, under our model, users must be tasked with performing the sense-making and semantic arbitration necessary to determine how any set of devices will be used together. This article describes the motivation and details of our infrastructure, its implications on the user experience, and our experience in creating, deploying, and using applications built with it over a period of several years.

© All rights reserved Edwards et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ackerman, Mark S., Dong, Tao, Gifford, Scott, Kim, Jungwoo, Newman, Mark W., Prakash, Atul, Qidwai, Sarah, Garcia, David, Villegas, Paulo, Cadenas, Alejandro, Snchez-Esguevillas, Antonio, Aguiar, Javier, Carro, Beln, Mailander, Sean, Schroeter, Ronald, Foth, Marcus and Bhattacharya, Amiya (2009): Location-Aware Computing, Virtual Networks. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (4) pp. 28-32.

2008
 
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Yatani, Koji, Partridge, Kurt, Bern, Marshall and Newman, Mark W. (2008): Escape: a target selection technique using visually-cued gestures. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 285-294.

Many mobile devices have touch-sensitive screens that people interact with using fingers or thumbs. However, such interaction is difficult because targets become occluded, and because fingers and thumbs have low input resolution. Recent research has addressed occlusion through visual techniques. However, the poor resolution of finger and thumb selection still limits selection speed. In this paper, we address the selection speed problem through a new target selection technique called Escape. In Escape, targets are selected by gestures cued by icon position and appearance. A user study shows that for targets six to twelve pixels wide, Escape performs at a similar error rate and at least 30% faster than Shift, an alternative technique, on a similar task. We evaluate Escape's performance in different circumstances, including different icon sizes, icon overlap, use of color, and gesture direction. We also describe an algorithm that assigns icons to targets, thereby improving Escape's performance.

© All rights reserved Yatani et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bellotti, Victoria, Begole, Bo, Chi, Ed H., Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Fang, Ji, Isaacs, Ellen, King, Tracy, Newman, Mark W., Partridge, Kurt, Price, Bob, Rasmussen, Paul and Roberts, Michael (2008): Activity-based serendipitous recommendations with the Magitti mobile leisure guide. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1157-1166.

This paper presents a context-aware mobile recommender system, codenamed Magitti. Magitti is unique in that it infers user activity from context and patterns of user behavior and, without its user having to issue a query, automatically generates recommendations for content matching. Extensive field studies of leisure time practices in an urban setting (Tokyo) motivated the idea, shaped the details of its design and provided data describing typical behavior patterns. The paper describes the fieldwork, user interface, system components and functionality, and an evaluation of the Magitti prototype.

© All rights reserved Bellotti et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Stewart, Jason, Bauman, Sara, Escobar, Michelle, Hilden, Jakob, Bihani, Kumud and Newman, Mark W. (2008): Accessible contextual information for urban orientation. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 332-335.

 
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Congleton, Ben, Ackerman, Mark S. and Newman, Mark W. (2008): The ProD framework for proactive displays. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 221-230.

 
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Newman, Mark W., Elliott, Ame and Smith, Trevor F. (2008): Providing an Integrated User Experience of Networked Media, Devices, and Services through End-User Composition. In: Indulska, Jadwiga, Patterson, Donald J., Rodden, Tom and Ott, Max (eds.) Pervasive 2008 - Pervasive Computing, 6th International Conference May 19-22, 2008, Sydney, Australia. pp. 213-227.

2007
 
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Newman, Mark W., Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Edwards, W. Keith, Sedivy, Jana Z. and Smith, Trevor F. (2007): Supporting the unremarkable: experiences with the obje Display Mirror. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (7) pp. 523-536.

2006
 
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Voida, Stephen, Edwards, W. Keith, Newman, Mark W., Grinter, Rebecca E. and Ducheneaut, Nicolas (2006): Share and share alike: exploring the user interface affordances of file sharing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 221-230.

With the rapid growth of personal computer networks and the Internet, sharing files has become a central activity in computer use. The ways in which users control the what, how, and with whom of sharing are dictated by the tools they use for sharing; there are a wide range of sharing practices, and hence a wide range of tools to support these practices. In practice, users' requirements for certain sharing features may dictate their choice of tool, even though the other affordances available through that tool may not be an ideal match to the desired manner of sharing. In this paper, we explore users' current practices in file sharing and examine the tools used to share files. Based on our findings, we unpack the features and affordances of these tools into a set of dimensions along which sharing tools can be characterized. Then, we present the set of user interface features we have prototyped in an interface called a sharing palette, which provides a platform for exploration and experimentation with new modalities of sharing. We briefly present the tool as a whole and then focus on the individual features of the sharing palette that support reported styles of sharing.

© All rights reserved Voida et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Newman, Mark W., Smith, Trevor F. and Schilit, Bill N. (2006): Recipes for Digital Living. In IEEE Computer, 39 (2) pp. 104-106.

2005
 
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Voida, Amy, Grinter, Rebecca E., Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Edwards, W. Keith and Newman, Mark W. (2005): Listening in: practices surrounding iTunes music sharing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 191-200.

This paper presents a descriptive account of the social practices surrounding the iTunes music sharing of 13 participants in one organizational setting. Specifically, we characterize adoption, critical mass, and privacy; impression management and access control; the musical impressions of others that are created as a result of music sharing; the ways in which participants attempted to make sense of the dynamic system; and implications of the overlaid technical, musical, and corporate topologies. We interleave design implications throughout our results and relate those results to broader themes in a music sharing design space.

© All rights reserved Voida et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Newman, Mark W., Seciivy, Jana Z. and Smith, Trevor F. (2005): Bringing network effects to pervasive spaces. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (3) pp. 15-17.

2004
 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Newman, Mark W., Sedivy, Jana Z. and Smith, Trevor (2004): Supporting serendipitous integration in mobile computing environments. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 60 (5) pp. 666-700.

In the richly networked world of the near future, mobile computing users will be confronted with an ever-expanding array of devices and services accessible in their environments. In such a world, we cannot expect to have available to us specific applications that allow us to accomplish every conceivable combination of devices that we may wish. Instead, we believe that many of our interactions with the network will be characterized by the use of "general purpose" tools that allow us to discover, use, and integrate multiple devices around us. This paper lays out the case for why we believe that so-called "serendipitous integration" is a necessary fact that we will face in mobile computing, and explores a number of design experiments into supporting end user configuration and control of networked environments through general purpose tools. We present an iterative design approach to creating such tools and their user interfaces, discuss our observations about the challenges of designing for such a world, and then explore a number of tools that take differing design approaches to overcoming these challenges. We conclude with a set of reflections on the user experience issues that we believe are inherent in dealing with ad hoc mobile computing in richly networked environments.

© All rights reserved Edwards et al. and/or Academic Press

2003
 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Bellotti, Victoria, Dey, Anind K. and Newman, Mark W. (2003): The challenges of user-centered design and evaluation for infrastructure. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 297-304.

 
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Newman, Mark W., Lin, James J. W., Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2003): DENIM: An Informal Web Site Design Tool Inspired by Observations of Practice. In Human-Computer Interaction, 18 (3) pp. 259-324.

Through a study of Web site design practice, we observed that designers employ multiple representations of Web sites as they progress through the design process and that these representations allow them to focus on different aspects of the design. In particular, we observed that Web site designers focus their design efforts at 3 different levels of granularity-site map, storyboard, and individual page-and that designers sketch at all levels during the early stages of design. Sketching on paper is especially important during the early phases of a project, when designers wish to explore many design possibilities quickly without focusing on low-level details. Existing Web design tools do not support such exploration tasks well, nor do they adequately integrate multiple site representations. Informed by these observations we developed DENIM: an informal Web site design tool that supports early phase information and navigation design of Web sites. It supports sketching input, allows design at different levels of granularity, and unifies the levels through zooming. Designers are able to interact with their sketched designs as if in a Web browser, thus allowing rapid creation and exploration of interactive prototypes. Based on an evaluation with professional designers as well as usage feedback from users who have downloaded DENIM from the Internet, we have made numerous improvements to the system and have received many positive reactions from designers who would like to use a system like DENIM in their work.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 Cited in the following chapter:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]


 
2002
 
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Newman, Mark W., Izadi, Shahram, Edwards, W. Keith, Sedivy, Jana Z. and Smith, Trevor (2002): User interfaces when and where they are needed: an infrastructure for recombinant computing. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 171-180.

Users in ubiquitous computing environments need to be able to make serendipitous use of resources that they did not anticipate and of which they have no prior knowledge. The Speakeasy recombinant computing framework is designed to support such ad hoc use of resources on a network. In addition to other facilities, the framework provides an infrastructure through which device and service user interfaces can be made available to users on multiple platforms. The framework enables UIs to be provided for connections involving multiple entities, allows these UIs to be delivered asynchronously, and allows them to be injected by any party participating in a connection.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Newman, Mark W., Sedivy, Jana Z., Smith, Trevor, Balfanz, Dirk, Smetters, D. K., Wong, H. Chi and Izadi, Shahram (2002): Using speakeasy for ad hoc peer-to-peer collaboration. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 256-265.

Peer-to-peer systems appear promising in terms of their ability to support ad hoc, spontaneous collaboration. However, current peer-to-peer systems suffer from several deficiencies that diminish their ability to support this domain, such as inflexibility in terms of discovery protocols, network usage, and data transports. We have developed the Speakeasy framework, which addresses these issues, and supports these types of applications. We show how Speakeasy addresses the shortcomings of current peer-to-peer systems, and describe a demonstration application, called Casca, that supports ad hoc peer-to-peer collaboration by taking advantages of the mechanisms provided by Speakeasy.

© All rights reserved Edwards et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Newman, Mark W., Sedivy, Jana Z., Neuwirth, Christine, Edwards, W. Keith, Hong, Jason I., Izadi, Shahram, Marcelo, Karen, Smith, Trevor F., Sedivy, Jana and Newman, Mark (2002): Designing for serendipity: supporting end-user configuration of ubiquitous computing environments. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 147-156.

The future world of ubiquitous computing is one in which we will be surrounded by an ever-richer set of networked devices and services. In such a world, we cannot expect to have available to us specific applications that allow us to accomplish every conceivable combination of devices that we might wish. Instead, we believe that many of our interactions will be through highly generic tools that allow enduser discovery, configuration, interconnection, and control of the devices around us. This paper presents a design study of such an environment, intended to support serendipitous, opportunistic use of discovered network resources. We present an examination of a generic browser-style application built on top of an infrastructure developed to support arbitrary recombination of devices and services, as well as a number of challenges we believe to be inherent in such settings.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
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Klemmer, Scott R., Newman, Mark W., Farrell, Ryan, Bilezikjian, Mark and Landay, James A. (2001): The designers' outpost: a tangible interface for collaborative web site. In: Marks, Joe and Mynatt, Elizabeth D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 14th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 11 - 14, 2001, Orlando, Florida. pp. 1-10.

In our previous studies into web design, we found that pens, paper, walls, and tables were often used for explaining, developing, and communicating ideas during the early phases of design. These wall-scale paper-based design practices inspired The Designers' Outpost, a tangible user interface that combines the affordances of paper and large physical workspaces with the advantages of electronic media to support information design. With Outpost, users collaboratively author web site information architectures on an electronic whiteboard using physical media (Post-it notes and images), structuring and annotating that information with electronic pens. This interaction is enabled by a touch-sensitive SMART Board augmented with a robust computer vision system, employing a rear-mounted video camera for capturing movement and a front-mounted high-resolution camera for capturing ink. We conducted a participatory design study with fifteen professional web designers. The study validated that Outpost supports information architecture work practice, and led to our adding support for fluid transitions to other tools.

© All rights reserved Klemmer et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Lin, James, Newman, Mark W., Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2000): DENIM: Finding a Tighter Fit between Tools and Practice for Web Site Design. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 510-517.

Through a study of web site design practice, we observed that web site designers design sites at different levels of refinement -- site map, storyboard, and individual page -- and that designers sketch at all levels during the early stages of design. However, existing web design tools do not support these tasks very well. Informed by these observations, we created DENIM, a system that helps web site designers in the early stages of design. DENIM supports sketching input, allows design at different refinement levels, and unifies the levels through zooming. We performed an informal evaluation with seven professional designers and found that they reacted positively to the concept and were interested in using such a system in their work.

© All rights reserved Lin et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Formal Methods: [/encyclopedia/formal_methods.html]


 
 
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Newman, Mark W. and Landay, James A. (2000): Sitemaps, Storyboards, and Specifications: A Sketch of Web Site Design Practice. In: Proceedings of DIS00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000. pp. 263-274.

Through a study of web site design practice, we observed that designers employ multiple representations of web sites as they progress through the design process, and that these representations allow them to focus on different aspects of the design. Designers also employ multiple tools during the course of a project, including graphic design, web development, presentation, and word processing software, as well as pen and paper. Sketching on paper is especially important during the design exploration phase of a project, when designers wish to explore many design possibilities quickly without focusing on low-level details. Web site design tools intended to support the early phases of the design process should employ informal interaction techniques, should support multiple site representations, and should integrate well with other applications that designers use regularly.

© All rights reserved Newman and Landay and/or ACM Press

 
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Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:31
Number of co-authors:80



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

W. Keith Edwards:11
Mark S. Ackerman:7
Jana Z. Sedivy:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Mark W. Newman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Anind K. Dey:71
Mark S. Ackerman:67
 
 
 

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by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
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Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
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The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
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The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
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