Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2011
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:22



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Batya Friedman:7
Eli Blevis:3
Nell Carden Grey:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Lisa P. Nathan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jennifer Mankoff:45
Eli Blevis:36
Batya Friedman:34
 
 
 

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Lisa P. Nathan

 

Publications by Lisa P. Nathan (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Lake, Milli, Grey, Nell Carden, Nilsen, Trond, Utter, Robert F., Utter, Elizabeth J., Ring, Mark, Kahn, Zoe and Friedman, Batya (2011): Multi-lifespan information system design: investigating a new design approach in Rwanda. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 591-597. Available online

In this paper we report on our research and design efforts to provide Rwandans with access to and reuse of video interviews discussing the failures and successes of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (UN-ICTR). We describe our general approach and report on three case studies with diverse sectors of Rwandan society: governmental information centres, youth clubs, and a grassroots organization working with victims of sexual violence. Our work includes the development and application of five indicators to assess the success and limitations of our approach: diverse stakeholders; diverse uses; on-going use; cultural, linguistic and geographic reach; and Rwandan initiative. This work makes three important contributions: first, it offers the information field a design approach for use in post-conflict situations; second, it provides near-term evaluation indicators as an initial set others can build from and extend; third, it describes the first empirical explorations of the multi-lifespan information system design research approach.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Friedman, Batya and Nathan, Lisa P. (2010): Multi-lifespan information system design: a research initiative for the hci community. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2243-2246. Available online

This CHI Note proposes a new research initiative for the HCI community: multi-lifespan information system design. The central idea begins with the identification of categories of problems that are unlikely to be solved within a single human lifespan. Three such categories are proposed: limitations of the human psyche, limitations of the structure of society, and slower moving natural time-scales. We then examine possible opportunities and roles for information systems to help construct longer-term solutions to such problems and, in turn, identify key challenges for such systems. Finally, we conclude by discussing significant real world problems that would benefit from a multi-lifespan design approach and point to open questions. This CHI Note's key contribution entails the articulation of a promising new research initiative for the HCI community.

© All rights reserved Friedman and Nathan and/or their publisher

 
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Friedman, Batya, Nathan, Lisa P., Lake, Milli, Grey, Nell Carden, Nilsen, Trond T., Utter, Robert F., Utter, Elizabeth J., Ring, Mark and Kahn, Zoe (2010): Multi-lifespan information system design in post-conflict societies: an evolving project in Rwanda. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2833-2842. Available online

In this paper we report on our early-stage research and design efforts to provide Rwandans with access to and reuse of video interviews from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. More generally, we investigate methods and designs that can be deployed successfully within a post-conflict political climate concerned about recurring violence. This work: (1) directly supports the Rwandan people in their efforts to achieve justice, healing and reconciliation; (2) provides the HCI community with methods and approaches for undertaking design in post-conflict situations; and (3) describes the first empirical exploration of multi-lifespan information system design.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Huh, Jina, Nathan, Lisa P., Silberman, Six, Blevis, Eli, Tomlinson, Bill, Sengers, Phoebe and Busse, Daniela (2010): Examining appropriation, re-use, and maintenance for sustainability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4457-4460. Available online

Within the past few years, the field of HCI has increasingly addressed the issue of environmental sustainability, primarily identifying the challenges and developing an agenda for designing for sustainability. Yet, the most difficult task remains, how do we develop realistic solutions when the digital ethos is based upon short-lived computing products that come and go at rapid pace. By examining appropriation, re-use, and maintenance practices, this workshop aims to identify sustainable interaction design challenges and directions in re-utilizing used or obsolete computing products for prolonged use.

© All rights reserved Huh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Nathan, Lisa P. and Friedman, Batya (2010): Interacting with policy in a political world: reflections from the voices from the Rwanda Tribunal project. In Interactions, 17 (5) pp. 56-59. Available online

2009
 
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Huang, Elaine M., Blevis, Eli, Mankoff, Jennifer, Nathan, Lisa P. and Tomlinson, Bill (2009): Defining the role of HCI in the challenges of sustainability. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4827-4830. Available online

Sustainability is an increasingly prominent and critical theme in the field of HCI. More needs to be known about how to critique and assess design from the perspective of sustainability, and how to integrate sustainability into the practice of HCI. This workshop focuses on achieving this integration, identifying challenges, and defining directions for Sustainable Interaction Design (SID).

© All rights reserved Huang et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Blevis, Eli, Friedman, Batya, Hasbrouck, Jay and Sengers, Phoebe (2008): Beyond the hype: sustainability & HCI. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2273-2276. Available online

In this panel we explore: (1) the burgeoning discourse on sustainability concerns within HCI, (2) the material and behavioral challenges of sustainability in relation to interaction design, (3) the benefits and risks involved in labeling a project or product as environmentally sustainable, and (4) implications of taking on (or ignoring) sustainability as a research, design, and teaching topic for HCI.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Nathan, Lisa P. (2008): Ecovillages, values, and interactive technology: balancing sustainability with daily life in 21st century America. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3723-3728. Available online

This project seeks to provide a rich account of the adaptive process that occurs as individuals with explicit value commitments interact with information technology. Specifically, ethnographic methods are being used to investigate the information technology adaptive process as it unfolds in the daily life of two ecovillages, communities made up of individuals striving to balance their use of technology with a lifestyle that is environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable. Anticipated research outcomes include: (1) an analytic description of information technology adaptive process; (2) a categorization of technological functionalities which support or constrain certain values, (3) an empirical extension of Value Sensitive Design, and (4) an analysis of the negotiation around tensions which emerge as a community's values influence the use of information technology features and, reciprocally, as information technology features influence a community's values. Most broadly this work contributes to our larger understanding of how the information technology adaptive process influences the human experience.

© All rights reserved Nathan and/or ACM Press

 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Friedman, Batya, Klasjna, Pedja V., Kane, Shaun K. and Miller, Jessica K. (2008): Envisioning Systemic Effects on Persons and Society Throughout Interactive System Design. In: Proceedsing of the ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems 2008, Cape Town, South Africa. p. 10. Available online

 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Friedman, Batya, Klasnja, Predrag, Kane, Shaun K. and Miller, Jessica K. (2008): Envisioning systemic effects on persons and society throughout interactive system design. In: Proceedings of DIS08 Designing Interactive Systems 2008. pp. 1-10. Available online

The design, development, and deployment of interactive systems can substantively impact individuals, society, and the natural environment, now and potentially well into the future. Yet, a scarcity of methods exists to support long-term, emergent, systemic thinking in interactive design practice. Toward addressing this gap, we propose four envisioning criteria -- stakeholders, time, values, and pervasiveness -- distilled from prior work in urban planning, design noir, and Value Sensitive Design. We characterize how the criteria can support systemic thinking, illustrate the integration of the envisioning criteria into established design practice (scenario-based design), and provide strategic activities to serve as generative envisioning tools. We conclude with suggestions for use and future work. Key contributions include: 1) four envisioning criteria to support systemic thinking, 2) value scenarios (extending scenario-based design), and 3) strategic activities for engaging the envisioning criteria in interactive system design practice.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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