Publication statistics

Pub. period:2006-2011
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:42



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Yi-Ping Hung:11
Jane Yung-jen Hsu:5
Ting-Ting Hu:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Li-Wei Chan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hao-Hua Chu:24
Yi-Ping Hung:20
Hsin-Hsi Chen:18
 
 
 

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Li-Wei Chan

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Publications by Li-Wei Chan (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Yu, Neng-Hao, Chan, Li-Wei, Lau, Seng Yong, Tsai, Sung-Sheng, Hsiao, I-Chun, Tsai, Dian-Je, Hsiao, Fang-I, Cheng, Lung-Pan, Chen, Mike, Huang, Polly and Hung, Yi-Ping (2011): TUIC: enabling tangible interaction on capacitive multi-touch displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2995-3004.

We present TUIC, a technology that enables tangible interaction on capacitive multi-touch devices, such as iPad, iPhone, and 3M's multi-touch displays, without requiring any hardware modifications. TUIC simulates finger touches on capacitive displays using passive materials and active modulation circuits embedded inside tangible objects, and can be used with multi-touch gestures simultaneously. TUIC consists of three approaches to sense and track objects: spatial, frequency, and hybrid (spatial plus frequency). The spatial approach, also known as 2D markers, uses geometric, multi-point touch patterns to encode object IDs. Spatial tags are straightforward to construct and are easily tracked when moved, but require sufficient spacing between the multiple touch points. The frequency approach uses modulation circuits to generate high-frequency touches to encode object IDs in the time domain. It requires fewer touch points and allows smaller tags to be built. The hybrid approach combines both spatial and frequency tags to construct small tags that can be reliably tracked when moved and rotated. We show three applications demonstrating the above approaches on iPads and 3M's multi-touch displays.

© All rights reserved Yu et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Chan, Li-Wei, Kao, Hui-Shan, Chen, Mike Y., Lee, Ming-Sui, Hsu, Jane and Hung, Yi-Ping (2010): Touching the void: direct-touch interaction for intangible displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2625-2634.

In this paper, we explore the challenges in applying and investigate methodologies to improve direct-touch interaction on intangible displays. Direct-touch interaction simplifies object manipulation, because it combines the input and display into a single integrated interface. While traditional tangible display-based direct-touch technology is commonplace, similar direct-touch interaction within an intangible display paradigm presents many challenges. Given the lack of tactile feedback, direct-touch interaction on an intangible display may show poor performance even on the simplest of target acquisition tasks. In order to study this problem, we have created a prototype of an intangible display. In the initial study, we collected user discrepancy data corresponding to the interpretation of 3D location of targets shown on our intangible display. The result showed that participants performed poorly in determining the z-coordinate of the targets and were imprecise in their execution of screen touches within the system. Thirty percent of positioning operations showed errors larger than 30mm from the actual surface. This finding triggered our interest to design a second study, in which we quantified task time in the presence of visual and audio feedback. The pseudo-shadow visual feedback was shown to be helpful both in improving user performance and satisfaction.

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Ko, Ju-Chun, Chan, Li-Wei and Hung, Yi-Ping (2010): Public issues on projected user interface. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2873-2882.

What will happen when pocket projectors become mainstream personal display channels? What will be affected when numerous projections intrude our living space without proper control? Today's technology in projection has promised a big screen viewing experience from mobile devices, pushing us toward a truly ubiquitous display environment. But, is our society prepared for the next projection-generation? We argue that the Projected user interface (PUI) will introduce new problems both in environmental and social aspects which are seldom been explored. This paper explores our rights to project and be projected in public space. Can we project on human body without asking for permission? Can we refuse to be projected? Can projection pollute the environment and influence the people therein? This paper proposes several issues about people's rights on projection, and provide discussions on possible solutions.

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Chan, Li-Wei, Wu, Hsiang-Tao, Kao, Hui-Shan, Ko, Ju-Chun, Lin, Home-Ru, Chen, Mike Y., Hsu, Jane and Hung, Yi-Ping (2010): Enabling beyond-surface interactions for interactive surface with an invisible projection. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 263-272.

This paper presents a programmable infrared (IR) technique that utilizes invisible, programmable markers to support interaction beyond the surface of a diffused-illumination (DI) multi-touch system. We combine an IR projector and a standard color projector to simultaneously project visible content and invisible markers. Mobile devices outfitted with IR cameras can compute their 3D positions based on the markers perceived. Markers are selectively turned off to support multi-touch and direct on-surface tangible input. The proposed techniques enable a collaborative multi-display multi-touch tabletop system. We also present three interactive tools: i-m-View, i-m-Lamp, and i-m-Flashlight, which consist of a mobile tablet and projectors that users can freely interact with beyond the main display surface. Early user feedback shows that these interactive devices, combined with a large interactive display, allow more intuitive navigation and are reportedly enjoyable to use.

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Yu, Neng-Hao, Chan, Li-Wei, Cheng, Lung-Pan, Chen, Mike Y. and Hung, Yi-Ping (2010): Enabling tangible interaction on capacitive touch panels. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 457-458.

We propose two approaches to sense tangible objects on capacitive touch screens, which are used in off-the-shelf multi-touch devices such as Apple iPad, iPhone, and 3M's multi-touch displays. We seek for the approaches that do not require modifications to the panels: spatial tag and frequency tag. Spatial tag is similar to fiducial tag used by tangible tabletop surface interaction, and uses multi-point, geometric patterns to encode object IDs. Frequency tag simulates high-frequency touches in the time domain to encode object IDs, using modulation circuits embedded inside tangible objects to simulate high-speed touches in varying frequency. We will show several demo applications. The first combines simultaneous tangible + touch input system. This explores how tangible inputs (e.g., pen, easer, etc.) and some simple gestures work together on capacitive touch panels.

© All rights reserved Yu et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Hsiao, Chuan-Heng, Chan, Li-Wei, Hu, Ting-Ting, Chen, Mon-Chu, Hsu, Jane and Hung, Yi-Ping (2009): To move or not to move: a comparison between steerable versus fixed focus region paradigms in multi-resolution tabletop display systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 153-162.

Previous studies have outlined the advantages of multi-resolution large-area displays over their fixed-resolution counterparts, however the mobility of the focus region has up until the present time received little attention. To study this phenomenon further, we have developed a multi-resolution tabletop display system with a steerable high resolution focus region to compare the performance between steerable and fixed focus region systems under different working scenarios. We have classified these scenarios according to region of interest (ROI) with analogies to different eye movement types (fixed, saccadic, and pursuit ROI). Empirical data gathered during the course of a multi-faceted user study demonstrates that the steerable focus region system significantly outperforms the fixed focus region system. The former is shown to provide enhanced display manipulation and proves especially advantageous in cases where the user must maintain spatial awareness of the display content as is the case in which, within a single session, several regions of the display are to be visited.

© All rights reserved Hsiao et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Chan, Li-Wei, Hu, Ting-Ting, Lin, Jin-Yao, Hung, Yi-Ping and Hsu, Jane Yung-jen (2008): On top of tabletop: A virtual touch panel display. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 169-176.

 
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Hu, Ting-Ting, Chia, Yi-Wei, Chan, Li-Wei, Hung, Yi-Ping and Hsu, Jane Yung-jen (2008): i-m-Top: An interactive multi-resolution tabletop system accommodating to multi-resolution human vision. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 177-180.

 
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Wu, Tien-Lin, Wang, Hsuan-Kai, Ho, Chien-Chang, Lin, Yuan-Pin, Hu, Ting-Ting, Weng, Ming-Fang, Chan, Li-Wei, Yang, Changhua, Yang, Yi-Hsuan, Hung, Yi-Ping, Chuang, Yung-Yu, Chen, Hsin-Hsi, Chen, Homer H., Chen, Jyh-Horng and Jeng, Shyh-Kang (2008): Interactive content presentation based on expressed emotion and physiological feedback. In: El-Saddik, Abdulmotaleb, Vuong, Son, Griwodz, Carsten, Bimbo, Alberto Del, Candan, K. Selcuk and Jaimes, Alejandro (eds.) Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Multimedia 2008 October 26-31, 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 1009-1010.

2007
 
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Chan, Li-Wei, Chuang, Yi-Fan, Chia, Yi-Wei, Hung, Yi-Ping and Hsu, Jane Yung-jen (2007): A New Method for Multi-finger Detection Using a Regular Diffuser. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part III 2007. pp. 573-582.

 
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Chan, Li-Wei, Chuang, Yi-Fan, Yu, Meng-Chieh, Chao, Yi-Liu, Lee, Ming-Sui, Hung, Yi-Ping and Hsu, Jane Yung-jen (2007): Gesture-based interaction for a magic crystal ball. In: Majumder, Aditi, Hodges, Larry F., Cohen-Or, Daniel and Spencer, Stephen N. (eds.) VRST 2007 - Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology November 5-7, 2007, Newport Beach, California, USA. pp. 157-164.

2006
 
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Chan, Li-Wei, Chiang, Ji-Rung, Chen, Yi-Chao, Ke, Chia-nan, Hsu, Jane Yung-jen and Chu, Hao-Hua (2006): Collaborative Localization: Enhancing WiFi-Based Position Estimation with Neighborhood Links in Clusters. In: Fishkin, Kenneth P., Schiele, Bernt, Nixon, Paddy and Quigley, Aaron J. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2006 - Pervasive Computing 4th International Conference May 7-10, 2006, Dublin, Ireland. pp. 50-66.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Jul 2011: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
24 Aug 2009: Modified
17 Jun 2009: Modified
16 Jun 2009: Modified
04 Jun 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/li-wei_chan.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2006-2011
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:42



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Yi-Ping Hung:11
Jane Yung-jen Hsu:5
Ting-Ting Hu:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Li-Wei Chan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hao-Hua Chu:24
Yi-Ping Hung:20
Hsin-Hsi Chen:18
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Gamification: Creating Addictive User Experience
Starts the day after tomorrow !
go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 3
66% booked. Starts in 29 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading