Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2011
Pub. count:4
Number of co-authors:17



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

John Alexis Guerra ..:2
Meirav Taieb-Maimon:2
Ben Shneiderman:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Krist Wongsuphasawat's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Catherine Plaisant:78
Benjamin B. Beders..:70
 
 
 

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Krist Wongsuphasawat

 

Publications by Krist Wongsuphasawat (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Wongsuphasawat, Krist, Gmez, John Alexis Guerra, Plaisant, Catherine, Wang, Taowei David, Taieb-Maimon, Meirav and Shneiderman, Ben (2011): LifeFlow: visualizing an overview of event sequences. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1747-1756. Available online

Event sequence analysis is an important task in many domains: medical researchers may study the patterns of transfers within the hospital for quality control; transportation experts may study accident response logs to identify best practices. In many cases they deal with thousands of records. While previous research has focused on searching and browsing, overview tasks are often overlooked. We introduce a novel interactive visual overview of event sequences called LifeFlow. LifeFlow is scalable, can summarize all possible sequences, and represents the temporal spacing of the events within sequences. Two case studies with healthcare and transportation domain experts are presented to illustrate the usefulness of LifeFlow. A user study with ten participants confirmed that after 15 minutes of training novice users were able to rapidly answer questions about the prevalence and temporal characteristics of sequences, find anomalies, and gain significant insight from the data.

© All rights reserved Wongsuphasawat et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Wongsuphasawat, Krist, Gmez, John Alexis Guerra, Plaisant, Catherine, Wang, Taowei, Taieb-Maimon, Meirav and Shneiderman, Ben (2011): LifeFlow: visualizing an overview of event sequences (video preview). In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 507-510. Available online

Event sequence analysis is an important task in many domains: medical researchers may study the patterns of transfers within the hospital for quality control; transportation experts may study accident response logs to identify best practices. In many cases they deal with thousands of records. While previous research has focused on searching and browsing, overview tasks are often overlooked. We introduce a novel interactive visual overview of event sequences called LifeFlow. LifeFlow is scalable, can summarize all possible sequences, and represents the temporal spacing of the events within sequences. In this video, we show an example of patient transfer data and briefly demonstrate how to analyze them with LifeFlow. Please see [11] or visit http:www.cs.umd.eduhcillifeflow for more detail.

© All rights reserved Wongsuphasawat et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yeh, Tom, Chang, Tsung-Hsiang, Xie, Bo, Walsh, Greg, Watkins, Ivan, Wongsuphasawat, Krist, Huang, Man, Davis, Larry S. and Bederson, Benjamin B. (2011): Creating contextual help for GUIs using screenshots. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 145-154. Available online

Contextual help is effective for learning how to use GUIs by showing instructions and highlights on the actual interface rather than in a separate viewer. However, end-users and third-party tech support typically cannot create contextual help to assist other users because it requires programming skill and source code access. We present a creation tool for contextual help that allows users to apply common computer skills-taking screenshots and writing simple scripts. We perform pixel analysis on screenshots to make this tool applicable to a wide range of applications and platforms without source code access. We evaluated the tool's usability with three groups of participants: developers, instructors, and tech support. We further validated the applicability of our tool with 60 real tasks supported by the tech support of a university campus.

© All rights reserved Yeh et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Wongsuphasawat, Krist, Artornsombudh, Pornpat, Nguyen, Bao and McCann, Justin (2009): Network stack diagnosis and visualization tool. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for the Management of Information Technology 2009. p. 4. Available online

End users are often frustrated by unexpected problems while using networked software, leading to frustrated calls to the help desk seeking solutions. However, trying to locate the cause of these unexpected behaviors is not a simple task. The key to many network monitoring and diagnosis approaches is using cross-layer information, but the complex interaction between network layers and usually large amount of collected data prevent IT support personnel from determining the root of errors and bottlenecks. There is a need for the tools that reduce the amount of data to be processed, offer a systematic exploration of the data, and assist whole-stack performance analysis. In this paper, we present Visty, a network stack visualization tool that allows IT support personnel to systematically explore network activities at end hosts. Visty can provide an overview picture of the network stack at any specified time, showing how errors in one layer affect the performance of others. Visty was designed as a prototype for more advanced diagnosis tools, and also may be used to assist novice users in understanding the network stack and relationships between each layer.

© All rights reserved Wongsuphasawat et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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