Publication statistics

Pub. period:1987-2009
Pub. count:30
Number of co-authors:36



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert W. Lindeman:7
Robert A. Lavine:3
James K. Hahn:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

John L. Sibert's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gary Marchionini:74
Mark Green:50
David S. Ebert:42
 
 
 
Jul 22

... in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.

-- Herbert Simon in "Computers, Communications and the Public Interest," 1971

 
 

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John L. Sibert

Has also published under the name of:
"John Sibert"

Personal Homepage:
seas.gwu.edu/~sibert/GW/John_Sibert_personal.html


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Publications by John L. Sibert (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Kim, Jae Woo, Fouad, Hesham, Sibert, John L. and Hahn, James K. (2009): Perceptually motivated automatic dance motion generation for music. In Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation, 20 (2) pp. 375-384.

2005
 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Sibert, John L., Mendez-Mendez, Erick, Patil, Sachin and Phifer, Daniel (2005): Effectiveness of directional vibrotactile cuing on a building-clearing task. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 271-280.

This paper presents empirical results to support the use of vibrotactile cues as a means of improving user performance on a spatial task. In a building-clearing exercise, directional vibrotactile cues were employed to alert subjects to areas of the building that they had not yet cleared, but were currently exposed to. Compared with performing the task without vibrotactile cues, subjects were exposed to uncleared areas a smaller percentage of time, and cleared more of the overall space, when given the added vibrotactile stimulus. The average length of each exposure was also significantly less when vibrotactile cues were present.

© All rights reserved Lindeman et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Gievska, Sonja and Sibert, John L. (2004): A Framework for Context-Sensitive Coordination of Human Interruptions in Human-Computer Interaction. In: Proceedings of the 8th ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All 2004. p. 418.

Recent trends in software development directed toward intelligence, distribution, and mobility need to be followed by an increased sophistication in user interface design. Employment of theoretically sound methods for managing and coordinating complex information, and supporting graceful switching between tasks is especially critical for information-intensive and safety-critical tasks. This paper presents a framework for computer-mediated coordination of human interruptions. As a basis for the framework a new Interruption Taxonomy is outlined to categorize a variety of traceable information needed to exhaustively describe the context space. An exploratory user study is underway to calibrate the kind of benefit gained with the formulated Interruption Model. The expressiveness of the proposed Interruption Model is demonstrated by concretizing the general approach using the particularities of the selected problem domain. The initial results have shown that taxonomy-based coordination of interruption resulted in statistically significant improvement of the primary task resumption time.

© All rights reserved Gievska and Sibert and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Page, Robert, Yanagida, Yasuyuki and Sibert, John L. (2004): Towards full-body haptic feedback: the design and deployment of a spatialized vibrotactile feedback system. In: Lau, Rynson W. H. and Baciu, George (eds.) VRST 2004 - Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology November 10-12, 2004, Hong Kong, China. pp. 146-149.

2003
 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Yanagida, Yasuyuki, Sibert, John L. and Lavine, Robert A. (2003): Effective Vibrotactile Cueing in a Visual Search Task. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03 Human-Computer Interaction 2003 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 89.

2002
 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Templeman, James N., Sibert, John L. and Cutler, Justin R. (2002): Handling of Virtual Contact in Immersive Virtual Environments: Beyond Visuals. In Virtual Reality, 6 (3) pp. 130-139.

2001
 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Sibert, John L. and Templeman, James N. (2001): The Effect of 3D Widget Representation and Simulated Surface Constraints on Interaction in Virtual Environments. In: VR 2001 2001. pp. 141-148.

2000
 
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Sibert, John L., Göktürk, Mehmet and Lavine, Robert A. (2000): The Reading Assistant: Eye Gaze Triggered Auditory Prompting for Reading Remediation. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 101-107.

 
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Lavine, Robert A. and Sibert, John L. (2000): Eye-tracking measures and human performance in a vigilance task. In Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 73 pp. 367-372.

1999
 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Sibert, John L. and Hahn, James K. (1999): Towards Usable VR: An Empirical Study of User Interfaces for Immersive Virtual Environments. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 64-71.

This paper reports empirical results from a study into the use of 2D widgets in 3D immersive virtual environments. Several researchers have proposed the use of 2D interaction techniques in 3D environments, however little empirical work has been done to test the usability of such approaches. We present the results of two experiments conducted on low-level 2D manipulation tasks within an immersive virtual environment. We empirically show that the addition of passive-haptic feedback for use in precise UI manipulation tasks can significantly increase user performance. Furthermore, users prefer interfaces that provide a physical surface, and that allow them to work with interface widgets in the same visual field of view as the objects they are modifying.

© All rights reserved Lindeman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lindeman, Robert W., Sibert, John L. and Hahn, James K. (1999): Hand-Held Windows: Towards Effective 2D Interaction in Immersive Virtual Environments. In: VR 1999 1999. pp. 205-212.

 
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Rohrer, Randall M., Sibert, John L. and Ebert, David S. (1999): A Shape-Based Visual Interface for Text Retrieval. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 19 (5) pp. 40-46.

1998
 
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Rowe, Dennis W., Sibert, John L. and Irwin, Don (1998): Hear Rate Variability: Indicator of User State as an Aid to Human-Computer Interaction. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Joëlle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 480-487.

This preliminary study explores the use of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) as an indicator of user state. In the study, a visual display is used to vary the levels of a complexity factor to assess the impact on user mental effort in a monitoring task. Mental effort is measured both subjectively and physiologically. Two findings indicate the potential value of HRV. First, user HRV showed significant discriminatory sensitivity to the manipulation of the independent variable on the basis of domain experience. Second, HRV appeared to indicate the point at which user capacity to process targets was exceeded. Results warrant further investigation but suggest the use of HRV as a tool for design and analysis of user interfaces, and as a research basis for use as component of an adaptive interface.

© All rights reserved Rowe et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Rohrer, Randall M., Sibert, John L. and Ebert, David S. (1998): The Shape of Shakespeare: Visualizing Text using Implicit Surfaces. In: InfoVis 1998 - IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 19-20 October, 1998, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. pp. 121-129.

1997
 
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Sibert, John L. (1997): Banff to Banff: A UISTful Retrospective. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. .

 
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Sibert, John L. and Göktürk, Mehmet (1997): A Finger-Mounted, Direct Pointing Device for Mobile Computing. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 41-42.

The index (first) finger of the dominant hand seems to be an intuitively natural and efficient means for pointing tasks. This paper presents the design of a device to enable pointing with the index finger as an interaction technique in mobile computers. The device, which uses infrared emission and detection to determine where on a screen the finger is pointing, is inexpensive and can easily be incorporated into a laptop computer.

© All rights reserved Sibert and and/or ACM Press

 
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Perez-Quinones, Manuel A. and Sibert, John L. (1997): Modular Dialogue Units: A Software Architecture for Programming Human-Computer Dialogues. In: Smith, Michael J., Salvendy, Gavriel and Koubek, Richard J. (eds.) HCI International 1997 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 24-29, 1997, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 355-358.

1996
 
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Darken, Rudolph P. and Sibert, John L. (1996): Wayfinding Strategies and Behaviors in Large Virtual Worlds. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 142-149.

People have severe problems wayfinding in large virtual worlds. However, current implementations of virtual worlds provide little support for effective wayfinding. We assert that knowledge about human wayfinding in the physical world can be applied to construct aids for wayfinding in virtual worlds. An experiment was conducted to determine whether people use physical world wayfinding strategies in large virtual worlds. The study measures subject performance on a complex searching task in a number of virtual worlds with differing environmental cues. The results show that subjects in the treatment without any additional cues were often disoriented and had extreme difficulty completing the task. In general, subjects' wayfinding strategies and behaviors were strongly influenced by the environmental cues in ways suggested by the underlying design principles.

© All rights reserved Darken and Sibert and/or ACM Press

 
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Quinones, Manuel A. Perez and Sibert, John L. (1996): A Collaborative Model of Feedback in Human-Computer Interaction. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 316-323.

Feedback plays an important role in human-computer interaction. It provides the user with evidence of closure, thus satisfying the communication expectations that users have when engaging in a dialogue. In this paper we present a model identifying five feedback states that must be communicated to the user to fulfill the communication expectations of a dialogue. The model is based on a linguistics theory of conversation, but is applied to a graphical user interface. An experiment is described in which we test users' expectations and their behavior when those expectations are not met. The model subsumes some of the temporal requirements for feedback previously reported in the human-computer interaction literature.

© All rights reserved Quinones and Sibert and/or ACM Press

 
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Darken, Rudolph P. and Sibert, John L. (1996): Navigating Large Virtual Spaces. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 8 (1) pp. 49-71.

As important as navigation is to human performance in virtual worlds, it is an often overlooked problem in the design process. This article reports an experiment intended to show that real-world wayfinding and environmental design principles are effective in designing virtual worlds that support skilled wayfinding behavior. The study measures participant performance on a complex searching task in a number of virtual worlds with differing environmental cues. The worlds are augmented with either a radial grid, a map, or both a grid and a map. The control condition provided no additional navigational cues. The results showed that navigational performance was superior under both map treatments as compared to the control and grid conditions. The grid was, however, shown to provide superior directional information as compared to the other conditions. The control condition provided the worst performance, with participants often becoming disoriented and experiencing extreme difficulty completing the tasks.

© All rights reserved Darken and Sibert and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

1993
 
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Darken, Rudolph P. and Sibert, John L. (1993): A Toolset for Navigation in Virtual Environments. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. pp. 157-165.

Maintaining knowledge of current position and orientation is frequently a problem for people in virtual environments. In this paper we present a toolset of techniques based on principles of navigation derived from real world analogs. We include a discussion of human and avian navigation behaviors and show how knowledge about them were used to design our tools. We also summarize an informal study we performed to determine how our tools influenced the subjects' navigation behavior. We conclude that principles extracted from real world navigation aids such as maps can be seen to apply in virtual environments.

© All rights reserved Darken and and/or ACM Press

 
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Sibert, John L. and Marchionini, Gary (1993): Human-Computer Interaction Research Agendas. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 12 (2) pp. 67-68.

 
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Perez, Manuel A. and Sibert, John L. (1993): Focus in Graphical User Interfaces. In: Gray, Wayne D., Hefley, William and Murray, Dianne (eds.) International Workshop on Intelligent User Interfaces 1993 January 4-7, 1993, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 255-257.

Focus in natural language processing is used to keep track of the attentional space of the participants in the dialogue. Graphical interfaces have still to benefit from the use of this level of communication. We discuss a graphical interface counter part called a focus space. Focus spaces can be used to combine multiple interaction styles (e.g. natural language with graphical pointing). We describe how a specific theory of discourse structure and focus space can be applied to graphical interfaces. The attentional space is maintained automatically by the system, and can be used by the software under program control. An example is provided showing how the attentional space can be used.

© All rights reserved Perez and Sibert and/or ACM Press

1991
 
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Braudes, Robert E. and Sibert, John L. (1991): ConMod: A System for Conceptual Consistency Verification and Communication. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 23 (1) pp. 92-94.

The ConMod system is a modelling tool for the construction, verification, and communication of user conceptual models. A basic premise behind the research is that consistency at the syntactic and lexical levels cannot counteract conceptual inconsistencies designed into a system, and a working definition of conceptual consistency is maintained in a user-extensible knowledge base. The system designer has the option to test the model for completeness and conceptual consistency based upon high-level knowledge of the types of objects in the model. ConMod also generates conceptual specifications for discussing the model with end users and prototyping and implementation teams. Finally, ConMod allows the conceptual structure of one model to be reused in a different model.

© All rights reserved Braudes and Sibert and/or ACM Press

 
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Marchionini, Gary and Sibert, John L. (1991): An Agenda for Human-Computer Interaction: Science and Engineering Serving Human Needs: Report of an Invitational Workshop Sponsored by The National Science Foundation. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 23 (4) pp. 17-32.

Human-computer interaction (HCI) research is concerned with the design of interfaces that allow easy and efficient use of computer systems. This report is the result of a workshop held to define the state of the art and to identify HCI research directions. The workshop was held on March 4 and 5, 1991 at George Washington University. The participants considered four areas of HCI research: theory and models; input/output devices; tools and architectures; and computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW). This report contains information about each of these areas. Discussions of infrastructure support for HCI focus on the requirements for special equipment and expertise and on difficulties associated with interdisciplinary research. Resource sharing strategies are recommended to minimize some of these problems.

© All rights reserved Marchionini and Sibert and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Bleser, Teresa and Sibert, John L. (1990): Toto: A Tool for Selecting Interaction Techniques. In: Hudson, Scott E. (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology October 03 - 05, 1990, Snowbird, Utah, United States. pp. 135-142.

The construction and maintenance of interactive user interfaces have been simplified by the development of a generation of software tools. The tools range from window managers, toolkits, and widget sets to user interface management systems and knowledge-based assistants. However, only a small number of the tools attempt to incorporate principles of good design. They offer no help with decisions regarding the variety of input devices and methods available. In this paper we briefly describe a methodology for interaction technique selection based on natural physical analogs of the application tools. Special emphasis is given to the physical characteristics of input devices and the pragmatics of their use. The methodology is incorporated in a software environment named Toto which includes knowledge acquired from a variety of disciplines such as: semiotics, ergonomics, and industrial design. Toto also incorporates a set of interactive tools for modifying the knowledge and for supporting the selection of natural interaction techniques. A two phased design process (matching followed by sequencing) is embedded in the Toto rule base. Examples of the use of Toto tools are provided to illustrate the design process.

© All rights reserved Bleser and and/or ACM Press

1989
 
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Sibert, John L. (ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology November 13 - 15, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States.

1988
 
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Bleser, Teresa W., Sibert, John L. and McGee, J. Patrick (1988): Charcoal Sketching: Returning Control to the Artist. In ACM Transactions on Graphics, 7 (1) pp. 76-81.

1987
 
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Sibert, John L., Buffa, Michael G., Crane, Hewitt D., Doster, Wolfgang, Rhyne, James R. and Ward, Jean Renard (1987): Issues limiting the acceptance of user interfaces using gesture input and handwriting character recognition. In: Graphics Interface 87 (CHI+GI 87) April 5-9, 1987, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 155-158.

 
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Olsen, Dan R., Green, Mark, Lantz, Keith A., Schulert, Andrew and Sibert, John L. (1987): Whither (or wither) UIMS?. In: Graphics Interface 87 (CHI+GI 87) April 5-9, 1987, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 311-314.

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/john_l__sibert.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1987-2009
Pub. count:30
Number of co-authors:36



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert W. Lindeman:7
Robert A. Lavine:3
James K. Hahn:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

John L. Sibert's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gary Marchionini:74
Mark Green:50
David S. Ebert:42
 
 
 
Jul 22

... in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.

-- Herbert Simon in "Computers, Communications and the Public Interest," 1971

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!