Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:33



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Emanuela Mazzone:7
Stuart MacFarlane:6
Panos Markopoulos:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Janet C. Read's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Alan J. Dix:107
Allison Druin:81
Panos Markopoulos:81
 
 
 

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Janet C. Read

PhD

Has also published under the name of:
"J. C. Read"

Personal Homepage:
uclan.ac.uk/schools/computing_engineering_physical/janetread.php


Current place of employment:
University of Central Lancashire

Director of the well known CHiCI group at the University of Central Lancashire in the UK, Dr Read specialises in the study of Child Computer Interaction, in Digital Ink for Text Input, and in the use of Wizrad of Oz in evaluatios.

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Publications by Janet C. Read (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Fitton, Dan, Thompson, James and Read, Janet C. (2012): Poking fun at the surface: exploring touch-point overloading on the multi-touch tabletop with child users. In: Proceedings of the HCI12 Conference on People and Computers XXVI 2012. pp. 227-232.

In this paper a collaborative game for children is used to explore touch-point overloading on a multi-touch tabletop. Understanding the occurrence of new interactional limitations, such as the situation of touch-point overloading in a multi-touch interface, is highly relevant for interaction designers working with emerging technologies. The game was designed for the Microsoft Surface 1.0 and during gameplay the number of simultaneous touch-points required gradually increases to beyond the physical capacity of the users. Studies were carried out involving a total of 42 children (from 2 different age groups) playing in groups of between 5-7 and all interactions were logged. From quantitative analysis of the interactions occurring during the game and observations made we explore the impact of overloading and identify other salient findings. This paper also highlights the need for empirical evaluation of the physical and cognitive limitations of interaction with emerging technologies.

© All rights reserved Fitton et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C. (2012): Evaluating artefacts with children: age and technology effects in the reporting of expected and experienced fun. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2012. pp. 241-248.

In interaction design, there are several metrics used to gather user experience data. A common approach is to use surveys with the usual method being to ask users after they have experienced a product as to their opinion and satisfaction. This paper describes the use of the Smileyometer (a product from the Fun Toolkit) to test for user experience with children by asking for opinions in relation to expected as well as experienced fun. Two studies looked at the ratings that children, from two different age groups and in two different contexts, gave to a set of varied age-appropriate interactive technology installations. The ratings given before use (expectations) are compared with ratings given after use (experience) across the age groups and across installations. The studies show that different ratings were given for the different installations and that there were age-related differences in the use of the Smileyometer to rate user experience; these firstly evidence that children can, and do, discriminate between different experiences and that children do reflect on user experience after using technologies. In most cases, across both age groups, children expected a lot from the technologies and their after use (experienced) rating confirmed that this was what they had got. The paper concludes by considering the implications of the collective findings for the design and evaluation of technologies with children.

© All rights reserved Read and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Read, Janet C., Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Markopoulos, Panos and Druin, Allison (2011): Child computer interaction invited SIG: IDC remixed, CCI remapped. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 689-691.

Over the past fifteen years, the discipline of Child Computer Interaction has been steadily growing. As the community matures and as methods and processes are refined, and become situated, there is an urgent need to start to develop a theory around CCI that can be used with some confidence by the research community. The CCI Community SIG at CHI is supporting this process by looking at the influences on the community. In a lively debate that will include presentations and discussion, this SIG will bring the community together in a discussion that will impact on the way the community proceeds.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C. (2011): Creating a child computer interaction curriculum. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC11 Interaction Design and Children 2011. pp. 268-270.

Child Computer Interaction (CCI) is a relatively new area of interest and as such, it does not have a taught curriculum of its own. In addition, interest in CCI is relatively limited and so the demand for specialist courses in this area is limited. The author of this paper has designed several courses focused on and around CCI and has also implemented short courses in the subject. In designing these courses, there is a need to take decisions about what to include and what to leave out given the size of the area and the limitations of demand. This paper discusses the content of these several courses and discusses how and why decisions were made as to what to include. The paper concludes with a rubric for selection of material that might be useful for others in this field.

© All rights reserved Read and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Kano, Akiyo, Horton, Matthew and Read, Janet C. (2010): Thumbs-up scale and frequency of use scale for use in self reporting of children's computer experience. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 699-702.

A Computer Experience questionnaire was piloted with 49 children to validate two new scales of measurement, the Thumbs-Up Scale (TUS) and Frequency of Use Scale (FUS). TUS is a VAS (Visually Analogue Scale) designed to measure perceived skill levels. FUS is a Likert scale for measuring how often a device is used or an event occurs. The two scales gained high correlation with their respective validation measures (TUS r=.892, FUS r=.744) indicating that TUS and FUS can be used effectively with children as young as 7 years old.

© All rights reserved Kano et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C., Fitton, Daniel and Mazzone, Emanuela (2010): Using obstructed theatre with child designers to convey requirements. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4063-4068.

This paper describes the use of obstructed theatre as a novel design method for the elicitation of ideas from children for the design of a new mobile product. Obstructed theatre has previously been used, in this same context with adults, but this is the first paper that outlines its use with children. The paper describes the initial ideas for the script for the theatre and evaluates its use. It is shown that the method can be useful and it specifically conveyed the idea of portability and mobility but was less effective at conveying the more complex interactive ideas. Specifically the paper outlines the origins of the method, presents some reflection on the usefulness of the method and suggests how it can be used with other contexts.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mazzone, Emanuela, Iivari, Netta, Tikkanen, Ruut, Read, Janet C. and Beale, Russell (2010): Considering context, content, management, and engagement in design activities with children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 108-117.

In this paper we describe three different design activities carried out for the design of a music device for children. The studies involved researchers from different disciplines as well as children from different schools. We reflected on what happened during the design activities and we looked at the outputs produced by the children in order to understand the feasibility of the activities from two perspectives: whether they contributed to the design of the product and whether they suitably involved children in the process. In relation to the design of the product, information gathered during the activities was associated either to the context or to the content of the design. In relation to the design method, the study enabled us to identify aspects of both children's' engagement and researchers' management that affected the success of the activities. We used these factors to create what we consider a useful framework for meaningful design activities.

© All rights reserved Mazzone et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C., Markopoulos, Panos and Druin, Allison (2010): Guest editorial Preface Children and their interactions with Mobile technology. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 2 (2) pp. i-iii.

 
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Marco, Javier, Baldassarri, Sandra, Cerezo, Eva, Xu, Diana Yifan and Read, Janet C. (2010): Let the experts talk: an experience of tangible game design with children. In Interactions, 17 (1) pp. 58-61.

 
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Sim, Gavin and Read, Janet C. (2010): The Damage Index: an aggregation tool for usability problem prioritisation. In: Proceedings of the HCI10 Conference on People and Computers XXIV 2010. pp. 54-61.

The aggregation of usability problems is an integral part of a usability evaluation. Numerous problems can be revealed and given that there are usually limited resources for fixing or redesigning the system then prioritisation of the problem set is essential. This paper examines the prioritisation of usability problems from a single heuristic evaluation and multiple heuristic evaluations of Questionmark Perception, a computer assisted assessment application widely used within educational institutions. Two different methods for prioritisation are critiqued; one based on the severity ratings alone and the other on a Damage Index formula proposed by the authors. The results highlight the difference in ranking of problems dependent upon the approach taken. The Damage Index offers a method of systematically prioritising the usability problems in a repeatable way, removing subjectivity from this process, therefore offering improvements over just the reliance upon the severity ratings alone.

© All rights reserved Sim and Read and/or BCS

2009
 
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Read, Janet C. (2009): Warp speed design: a rapid design method for use with children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4681-4686.

This paper introduces a new design method -- Warp Speed Design -- for use with older children (aged 9+) for the design of workable tangible games. The rationale for the method is presented and then a workshop, in which the method was evaluated, is described. The method introduced children to basic programming concepts and worked surprisingly well. Almost all of the designs made by the children were so well specifies at the end of the brief workshop that they were able to be developed with very little uncertainty.

© All rights reserved Read and/or ACM Press

 
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Marco, Javier, Cerezo, Eva, Baldasarri, Sandra, Mazzone, Emanuela and Read, Janet C. (2009): User-oriented design and tangible interaction for kindergarten children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 190-193.

This paper describes a tabletop prototype that allows kindergarten children to take the benefits of the new pedagogical possibilities that tangible interaction and tabletop technologies offer to manipulative learning. After analyzing children's cognitive and psychomotorial skills, we have designed and tuned a prototype game suitable for children aged 3 to 4 years old. Our prototype uniquely combines low cost tangible interaction and tabletop technology with tutored learning. The design has been based on observations of the children using the technology, letting them freely play with the application during three play sessions. These observational sessions informed the design decisions for the game whilst also confirming the children's enjoyment with the prototype.

© All rights reserved Marco et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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McKnight, Lorna and Read, Janet C. (2009): Designing the 'record' button: using children's understanding of icons to inform the design of a musical interface. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 258-261.

While standard icons often exist for common tasks, it can be difficult to design meaningful icons for non-standard tasks. Following a desire to build a music application that does not rely on text-based instructions, this paper explores suitable iconic representations for a 'record music' function on a mobile device. A study was carried out with primary school children (aged 8-10) to explore their current understanding of icons and elicit their requirements. It was seen that they were familiar with common icons, but that audio recording remains a difficult concept to represent through icons alone.

© All rights reserved McKnight and Read and/or ACM Press

 
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Xu, Diana, Read, Janet C., Sim, Gavin and McManus, Barbara (2009): Experience it, draw it, rate it: capture children's experiences with their drawings. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 266-270.

This paper investigates the use of drawings as a tool for the evaluation of children's interfaces. In the study, children's experiences on a variety of computer interfaces were captured in drawings. A group of four researchers participated in the coding of the drawings, before the results were aggregated and statistically analysed. The evaluation of the approach is positive: the chosen drawing method could be used easily and was effective in conveying the user experience from the drawings; a number of the drawings conveyed information pertaining to user experiences: fun (F), goal fit (GF) and tangible magic (TM); the method was found generally reliable at capturing all three elements and particularly reliable at capturing fun.

© All rights reserved Xu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Marco, Javier, Cerezo, Eva, Baldassarri, Sandra, Mazzone, Emanuela and Read, Janet C. (2009): Bringing tabletop technologies to kindergarten children. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 103-111.

Taking computer technology away from the desktop and into a more physical, manipulative space, is known that provide many benefits and is generally considered to result in a system that is easier to learn and more natural to use. This paper describes a design solution that allows kindergarten children to take the benefits of the new pedagogical possibilities that tangible interaction and tabletop technologies offer for manipulative learning. After analysis of children's cognitive and psychomotor skills, we have designed and tuned a prototype game that is suitable for children aged 3 to 4 years old. Our prototype uniquely combines low cost tangible interaction and tabletop technology with tutored learning. The design has been based on the observation of children using the technology, letting them freely play with the application during three play sessions. These observational sessions informed the design decisions for the game whilst also confirming the children's enjoyment of the prototype.

© All rights reserved Marco et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Xu, Diana Yifan, Read, Janet C., Sim, Gavin, McManus, Barbara and Qualter, Pam (2009): Children and 'smart' technologies: can children's experiences be interpreted and coded?. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 224-231.

This paper has a focus on young children and their emerging new technologies. It examines children's drawings as an evaluation tool for capturing their experiences of different novel interfaces. A recent evaluation study with children and two follow-up expert coding sessions were used to demonstrate how drawings could be used and coded and how the intercoder reliability could be improved. Usability and User Experience (UX) factors: Fun (F), Goal Fit (GF) and Tangible Magic (TM) were included in the coding scheme and they were the factors that have been looked at in the coding sessions. Our studies show the thoroughness and ease-of-use of the drawing method. The method was effective and reliable in conveying the user experience form the drawings. It also shows some of the limitation of the method: e.g. resource intensive and open to evaluator's interpretation. From the result of the study, a number of the drawings conveyed information pertaining to user experiences: F, GF and TM, and the method was particularly reliable at capturing fun. The result also led to the correlation found on the GF and TM.

© All rights reserved Xu et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C. and Beale, Russell (2009): Under my pillow: designing security for children's special things. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 288-292.

This paper describes a novel design activity that was used to gather insights into security requirements for a mobile application for children. The general aim of the study was to understand how to design for security in an application for children rather than to specifically generate design solutions. To gather this information, a novel design activity, referred to here as Participatory Analogy, was devised. The study is described and design solutions that emerged following analysis of the children's contributions are presented.

© All rights reserved Read and Beale and/or their publisher

 
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Kano, Akiyo and Read, Janet C. (2009): Text input error categorisation: solving character level insertion ambiguities using Zero Time analysis. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 293-302.

A review of literature on text input error categorisation revealed the need for a formal method to assist in solving ambiguities. This paper proposes a method of solving one such set of ambiguities, those caused by insertion of an extra letter. The method uses two rules: the Zero Time rule and Impossible NT/CT-Mu rule to establish whether the extra letter was inserted with another letter, or inserted individually. The method was applied to two large studies conducted to gather typing errors from students and children. The results show that the method is able to solve 100% of all insertion-only ambiguities and in doing so it helps reduce ambiguities in 75-85% of the remaining ambiguities.

© All rights reserved Kano and Read and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Read, Janet C., Markopoulos, Panos, Pares, Narcis, Hourcade, Juan Pablo and Antle, Alissa N. (2008): Child computer interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2419-2422.

The study of Child Computer Interaction is a growing subfield of HCI. Child Computer Interaction encompasses traditional HCI but also specifically reaches out into the areas of child psychology, learning and play. The aim of this SIG is to bring together researchers and practitioners working in this area, to discover current themes, to explore the creation of a more formal working group, to locate publishing opportunities and to foster international co-operation.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mazzone, Emanuela, Read, Janet C. and Beale, Russell (2008): Design with and for disaffected teenagers. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 290-297.

This paper describes how an e-learning product for teenagers was developed using design sessions based on a participatory design approach. The product, in the form of a computer game, is the outcome of a project that aims to improve teenagers' emotional intelligence. The specific user group is from institutes for pupils that had previously been excluded from mainstream education. The novelty in the approach is that participants were involved in designing a tool that was intended to modify their emotional behaviour -- for this discussion, it is the participation in the process that is critical, less so the end product. The project and the design approaches are described and the participatory activity is reflected on. The benefits resulting from the design sessions were bi-directional: the engagement with the prospective users was valuable both for the actual contribution to the product design and as an experience for the participants.

© All rights reserved Mazzone et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C. and Markopoulos, Panos (2008): Understanding children's interactions: evaluating children's interactive products. In Interactions, 15 (6) pp. 26-29.

 
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Read, Janet C. (2008): What You See is What You Worry About: Errors -- Real and Imagined. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 79-82.

This paper describes a text task in which children wrote their own stories in their regular school books, copied these stories onto digital paper using digital pens, had their handwritten stories recognized by the computer software, and then, looked at the text presented back to them and highlighted errors. There was considerable variability in the ability of the children to spot errors. Some children marked text as being wrong when in fact it was right. Most children spotted almost all the errors but were less likely to notice errors where incorrect but reasonable words had been presented back to them than where the words given by the recognizer were nonsense. In 13 instances, children had one of their own errors corrected by the interface but this was not noticed. The study highlighted several difficulties with the classification and reporting of errors in handwriting recognition based interfaces especially in the counting and classification of errors. Two new metrics for classifying and counting errors in this context are therefore proposed in this paper.

© All rights reserved Read and/or his/her publisher

 
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Xu, Diana, Read, Janet C. and Sheehan, Robert (2008): In Search of Tangible Magic. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 97-100.

This paper describes a small study of children's drawings in the context of tangible interaction. The study was intended to discover what children could draw that would indicate what they understood about tangible interactions. Two different tangible interfaces were considered, and for each of these, a different reporting format was used. The children's drawings were coded by three researchers and the results aggregated. The study shows that the coding method chosen was effective in conveying the information from the diagrams. The different reporting methods were similar but there was some evidence that one reporting format seemed to favour the inclusion of people in the drawings. Around a third of all the drawings conveyed information pertaining to user experience and in particular, expressions of tangible magic.

© All rights reserved Xu et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Horton, Matthew and Read, Janet C. (2008): Interactive Whiteboards in the Living Room? -- Asking Children about their Technologies. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 147-148.

In this poster we report the findings from a study of technologies in the home and school and use these results to discuss the validity and variability of children's reports of technologies. The results indicate that children may not understand well the types of interactive technologies that were discussed and that there may be some confusion about the names of technologies. In addition, the study indicated some confusion about where a technology resides.

© All rights reserved Horton and Read and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Read, Janet C. (2007): A study of the usability of handwriting recognition for text entry by children. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (1) pp. 57-69.

This paper describes a pilot study that investigated the usability of handwriting recognition for text entry in a free writing activity. The study was carried out with eighteen children aged 7 and 8; each used three different writing methods to construct short pieces of text. The methods used were; pencil and paper, the QWERTY keyboard at a computer, and a pen and graphics tablet. Where the pen and graphics tablet was used, the handwritten text was recognised by the software and presented back to the children as ASCII text. Measures of user satisfaction, quantity of text produced, and quality of writing produced, were taken. In addition, for the handwritten work, the recognition process was evaluated by comparing what the child wrote with the resulting ASCII text. The results show that the children that took part in the study generally produced lengthier texts at the graphics tablet than at the QWERTY keyboard but that the non-technical solution, the pencil and paper was, in this instance, the overall best method for composing writing. To further the debate on the possibilities for digital ink and tablet technologies, key usability problems with the handwriting recognition interface are identified and classified, and solutions to these usability problems, in the form of design guidelines for both recognition-based and pen-based computer writing interfaces, are presented. Additionally, some reflections on how studies of text input and free writing composition can be evaluated are offered.

© All rights reserved Read and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Xu, Diana, Read, Janet C., Mazzone, Emanuela, MacFarlane, Stuart and Brown, Martin (2007): Evaluation of Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs) for and with Children - Methods and Challenges. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part II July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 1008-1017.

2006
 
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Kelly, S. Rebecca, Mazzone, Emanuela, Horton, Matthew and Read, Janet C. (2006): Bluebells: a design method for child-centred product development. In: Proceedings of the Fourth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 361-368.

This paper presents Bluebells, a design method that balances child-centred design with expert design in a progressive approach that marries the best of both disciplines. The method is described in the context of a museum technologies project. Bluebells comprises several new design techniques; these are evaluated and discussed in the paper. The authors conclude with guidelines for future use of the Bluebells method including the importance of providing a context for design partners and allowing them to express their ideas in ways they are comfortable with.

© All rights reserved Kelly et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kano, Akiyo, Read, Janet C. and Dix, Alan J. (2006): Children's phrase set for text input method evaluations. In: Proceedings of the Fourth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 449-452.

This paper investigates the suitability of current phrase sets available in HCI for use with children in text entry experiments. It first examines the use of phrase sets within text input method evaluation, and suggests several reasons why the currently available phrase sets may not be suitable for use with children. A new phrase set, containing 500 phrases which have been taken from children's books, is presented. A study that compared the adult focused phrase set with the new children's phrase set is described. This study concludes that the new phrase set is suitable for use with children and, given that results with the two phrase sets were similar, the study adds validity to the existing adult phrase set.

© All rights reserved Kano et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Read, Janet C. and MacFarlane, Stuart (2006): Using the fun toolkit and other survey methods to gather opinions in child computer interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC06: Interaction Design and Children 2006. pp. 81-88.

The paper begins with a review of some of the current literature on the use of survey methods with children. It then presents four known concerns with using survey methods for opinion gathering and reflects on how these concerns may impact on studies in Child Computer Interaction. The paper then investigates the use of survey methods in Child Computer Interaction and investigates the Fun Toolkit. Three new research studies into the efficacy and usefulness of the tools are presented and these culminate in some guidelines for the future use of the Fun Toolkit. The authors then offer some more general guidelines for HCI researchers and developers intending to use survey methods in their studies with children. The paper closes with some thoughts about the use of survey methods in this interesting but complex area.

© All rights reserved Read and MacFarlane and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Read, Janet C. (2005): The Usability of Digital Ink Technologies for Children and Teenagers. In: Proceedings of the HCI05 Conference on People and Computers XIX 2005. pp. 19-36.

2004
 
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Read, Janet C., MacFarlane, Stuart and Gregory, Peggy (2004): Requirements for the design of a handwriting recognition based writing interface for children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC04: Interaction Design and Children 2004. pp. 81-87.

This paper describes how the design of a novel writing interface for children was informed by requirements gathering. The derivation of a set of system requirements from observations of children using early prototypes of the interface and from modelling the system is described, and then two methods of gathering further requirements by surveying children are outlined. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. The children were not able to contribute to the full range of requirements necessary for a complete system, but they contributed fun requirements that the observational work failed to identify. A model of the child's relationship to interactive systems is used to discuss why this is the case.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Read, Janet C., MacFarlane, S. and Horton, M. (2004): The Usability of Handwriting Recognition for Writing in the Primary Classroom. In: Proceedings of the HCI04 Conference on People and Computers XVIII 2004. pp. 135-150.

2003
 
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Read, Janet C., MacFarlane, Stuart and Casey, Chris (2003): What's going on?: discovering what children understand about handwriting recognition interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC03: Interaction Design and Children 2003. pp. 135-140.

When people use interactive technology, they construct a 'mental model' of the processes that are going on. This model assists the user in error repair and in task completion. The mental models that children have of computer systems are known to be brittle and incomplete. This paper describes how three different methods - structured interview, questionnaire, and talk back, were used with 7 and 8-year-old children to identify children's mental models of a handwriting-recognition based interface. The time taken by both the child and the researcher, the insights reported by the children, and the ease of use of each of the three methods is reported. The three methods are then compared, both in terms of cost/benefit and with relation to the influence of the researcher in the process. The paper concludes that the interview and questionnaire were both effective in this study, and that questionnaires can be surprisingly informative with children of this age.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Read, Janet C., MacFarlane, Stuart and Casey, Chris (2003): 'Good enough for what?': acceptance of handwriting recognition errors by child users. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC03: Interaction Design and Children 2003. p. 155.

This paper describes an experiment to establish whether or not children would accept a lower rate of accuracy for handwriting recognition than the 97% reported in a study with adult users. It outlines the experimental procedure that involved the use of an automated Wizard of Oz method. Problems with the experiment are described and the results are presented.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Read, Janet C., MacFarlane, Stuart and Casey, Chris (2002): Oops! silly me! errors in a handwriting recognition-based text entry interface for children. In: Proceedings of the Second Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 19-23, 2002, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 35-40.

This paper describes an empirical study in which children aged 7 and 8 used handwriting recognition software and hardware to input their own unconstrained text into the computer. The children were observed using the software, and the behaviour of both the children and the system is described. Handwriting recognition is a 'disobedient' technology; that is, it behaves erroneously, sometimes failing to generate correct representations of the child's intentions. This presents problems for the child, and these problems, and the strategies which the children adopted, are considered. Previous work on error correction with disobedient interfaces is used to provide grounding for the discussion. Two models are proposed, one describing user-states, the second introducing the notion of 'tidal' error repair. These models are then used to suggest some strategies for the design of more usable handwriting recognition interfaces for children.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/janet_c__read.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:33



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Emanuela Mazzone:7
Stuart MacFarlane:6
Panos Markopoulos:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Janet C. Read's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Alan J. Dix:107
Allison Druin:81
Panos Markopoulos:81
 
 
 

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Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

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