Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2009
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:17



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Clifford A. Shaffer:4
John C. Tang:4
Mary Beth Rosson:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

James Begole's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mary Beth Rosson:142
John C. Tang:37
Nicole Yankelovich:24
 
 
 

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James Begole

Has also published under the name of:
"James Bo Begole"

 

Publications by James Begole (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Kim, Taemie J., Chu, Maurice, Brdiczka, Oliver and Begole, James (2009): Predicting shoppers' interest from social interactions using sociometric sensors. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4513-4518. Available online

Marketing research has longed for better ways to measure consumer behavior. In this paper, we explore using sociometric data to study social behaviors of group shoppers. We hypothesize that the interaction patterns among shoppers will convey their interest level, predicting probability of purchase. To verify our hypotheses, we observed co-habiting couples shopping for furniture. We have verified that there are sensible differences in customer behavior depending on their interest level. When couples are interested in an item they observe the item for a longer duration of time and have a more balanced speaking style. A real-time prediction model was constructed using a decision tree with a prediction accuracy reaching 79.8% and a sensitivity of 63%.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Sala, Matthias C., Partridge, Kurt, Jacobson, Linda and Begole, James (2007): An Exploration into Activity-Informed Physical Advertising Using PEST. In: LaMarca, Anthony, Langheinrich, Marc and Truong, Khai N. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2007 - Pervasive Computing 5th International Conference May 13-16, 2007, Toronto, Canada. pp. 73-90. Available online

2004
 
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Begole, James, Matsakis, Nicholas E. and Tang, John C. (2004): Lilsys: Sensing Unavailability. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 511-514. Available online

As communications systems increasingly gather and propagate information about people's reachability or "presence", users need better tools to minimize undesired interruptions while allowing desired ones. We review the salient elements of presence and availability that people use when initiating face-to-face communication. We discuss problems with current strategies for managing one's availability in telecommunication media. We describe a prototype system called Lilsys which passively collects availability cues gathered from users' actions and environment using ambient sensors and provides machine inferencing of unavailability. We discuss observations and design implications from deploying Lilsys.

© All rights reserved Begole et al. and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Begole, James, Tang, John C. and Hill, Rosco (2003): Rhythm modeling, visualizations and applications. In: Proceedings of the 16th annural ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology November, 2-5, 2003, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 11-20. Available online

People use their awareness of others' temporal patterns to plan work activities and communication. This paper presents algorithms for programatically detecting and modeling temporal patterns from a record of online presence data. We describe analytic and end-user visualizations of rhythmic patterns and the tradeoffs between them. We conducted a design study that explored the accuracy of the derived rhythm models compared to user perceptions, user preference among the visualization alternatives, and users' privacy preferences. We also present a prototype application based on the rhythm model that detects when a person is "away" for an extended period and predicts their return. We discuss the implications of this technology on the design of computer-mediated communication.

© All rights reserved Begole et al. and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Begole, James, Tang, John C., Smith, Randall B. and Yankelovich, Nicole (2002): Work rhythms: analyzing visualizations of awareness histories of distributed groups. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 334-343. Available online

We examined records of minute-by-minute computer activity coupled with information about the location of the activity, online calendar appointments, and e-mail activity. We present a number of visualizations of the data that exhibit meaningful patterns in users' activities. We demonstrate how the patterns vary between individuals and within individuals according to time of day, location, and day of the week. Some patterns augment the schedule information found in people's online calendars. We discuss applications for group coordination (especially across time zones) plus opportunities for future research. In light of the popularity of instant messaging, this research identifies some of the benefits and privacy risks associated with the uses of online presence and awareness information.

© All rights reserved Begole et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
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Tang, John C., Yankelovich, Nicole, Begole, James, Kleek, Max Van, Li, Francis and Bhalodia, Janak (2001): ConNexus to Awarenex: Extending Awareness to Mobile Users. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 221-228. Available online

We explored the use of awareness information to facilitate communication by developing a series of prototypes. The ConNexus prototype integrates awareness information, instant messaging, and other communication channels in an interface that runs on a desktop computer. The Awarenex prototype extends that functionality to wireless handheld devices, such as a Palm. A speech interface also enables callers to make use of the awareness information over the telephone. While the prototypes offer similar functionality, the interfaces reflect the different design affordances and use context of each platform. We discuss the design implications of providing awareness information on devices with varying interface and network characteristics.

© All rights reserved Tang et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Begole, James, Rosson, Mary Beth and Shaffer, Clifford A. (1999): Flexible Collaboration Transparency: Supporting Worker Independence in Replicated Application-Sharing Systems. In ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR), 6 (2) pp. 95-132. Available online

This article presents a critique of conventional collaboration transparency systems, also called "application-sharing" systems, which provide the real-time shared use of legacy single-user applications. We find that conventional collaboration transparency systems are inefficient in their use of network resources and lack support for key groupware principles: concurrent work, relaxed WYSIWIS, and group awareness. Next, we present an alternative approach to implementing collaboration transparency that provides many features previously seen only in collaboration-aware applications. Our approach is based on a replicated architecture where selected single-user interface components are dynamically replaced by multiuser versions. The replacement occurs at run-time and is transparent to the single-user application and its developers. As an instance of this approach, we describe its incorporation into a Java-based collaboration transparency system for serializable, Swing-based Java applications, called Flexible JAMM (Java Applets Made Multiuser). To validate that the flexible collaboration transparency system is truly an improvement over conventional systems, we conducted an empirical study of collaborators performing both tightly and loosely coupled tasks using Flexible JAMM versus a representative conventional collaboration transparency system, Microsoft NetMeeting. Completion times were significantly faster in the loosely coupled task using Flexible JAMM and were not adversely affected in the tightly coupled task. Accuracy was equivalent for both systems. Participants greatly preferred Flexible JAMM.

© All rights reserved Begole et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Begole, James, Rosson, Mary Beth and Shaffer, Clifford A. (1998): Supporting Worker Independence in Collaboration Transparency. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 133-142. Available online

Conventional collaboration-transparency systems, which provide real-time shared use of legacy single-user applications, are inefficient in their use of network resources and lack support for key groupware principles: concurrent work, relaxed WYSIWIS, and group awareness. We present an alternative implementation approach to collaboration transparency that provides many features previously seen only in collaboration-aware applications. Our approach is based on an object-oriented replicated architecture where selected single-user interface objects are dynamically replaced by multi-user extensions. The replacement occurs at run-time and is transparent to the single-user application and its developers. As an instance of this approach, we describe its incorporation into a new Java-based collaboration-transparency system for serializable, Swing-based Java applications, called Flexible JAMM (Java Applets Made Multiuser). We conducted an empirical study to evaluate the effectiveness of Flexible JAMM versus a representative conventional collaboration-transparency system, Microsoft NetMeeting. Completion times were significantly faster in a loosely-coupled task using Flexible JAMM, and were not adversely affected in a tightly-coupled task, which had been a concern. Accuracy was unaffected by the system used. Participants greatly preferred Flexible JAMM.

© All rights reserved Begole et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Begole, James, Struble, Craig A., Shaffer, Clifford A. and Smith, Randall B. (1997): Transparent Sharing of Java Applets: A Replicated Approach. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 55-64. Available online

People interact together in all aspects of life and, as computers have become prevalent, users seek computer support for their interactions. The WWW provides an unprecedented opportunity for users to interact with each other, and the advent of Java has created a consistent computing environment to support synchronous collaboration. We describe JAMM, a prototype Java runtime environment that supports the shared use of existing Java applets, thus leveraging the existing base of software for synchronous collaboration. Our approach is based on a replicated architecture, where each user maintains their own copy of the Java applet, and the users' input events are broadcast to each applet copy. We discuss solutions to certain key problems, such as unanticipated sharing, supporting late-joiners and replicating input sources other than user inputs (e.g., files, sockets, and random number generators).

© All rights reserved Begole et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Begole, James, Struble, Craig A. and Shaffer, Clifford A. (1997): Leveraging Java Applets: Toward Collaboration Transparency in Java. In IEEE Internet Computing, 1 (2) pp. 57-64.

 
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