Jul 09

The evolution of HCI technology is a coevolution of HCI tasks and HCI artifacts: A task implicitly sets requirements for the development of artifacts to support; an artifact suggests possibilities and introduces constraints that often radically redefine the task for which the artifact was originally developed. [...] This dynamic relation, the task-artifact cycle, circumscribes the development activities of human-computer interaction

-- John M. Carroll, Wendy A. Kellogg, and Mary Beth Rosson in "The Task-Artifact Cycle" in Designing Interaction (1992)

 
 

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I-Chun Hsiao

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Publications by I-Chun Hsiao (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Yu, Neng-Hao, Chan, Li-Wei, Lau, Seng Yong, Tsai, Sung-Sheng, Hsiao, I-Chun, Tsai, Dian-Je, Hsiao, Fang-I, Cheng, Lung-Pan, Chen, Mike, Huang, Polly and Hung, Yi-Ping (2011): TUIC: enabling tangible interaction on capacitive multi-touch displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2995-3004.

We present TUIC, a technology that enables tangible interaction on capacitive multi-touch devices, such as iPad, iPhone, and 3M's multi-touch displays, without requiring any hardware modifications. TUIC simulates finger touches on capacitive displays using passive materials and active modulation circuits embedded inside tangible objects, and can be used with multi-touch gestures simultaneously. TUIC consists of three approaches to sense and track objects: spatial, frequency, and hybrid (spatial plus frequency). The spatial approach, also known as 2D markers, uses geometric, multi-point touch patterns to encode object IDs. Spatial tags are straightforward to construct and are easily tracked when moved, but require sufficient spacing between the multiple touch points. The frequency approach uses modulation circuits to generate high-frequency touches to encode object IDs in the time domain. It requires fewer touch points and allows smaller tags to be built. The hybrid approach combines both spatial and frequency tags to construct small tags that can be reliably tracked when moved and rotated. We show three applications demonstrating the above approaches on iPads and 3M's multi-touch displays.

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Yu, Neng-Hao, Tsai, Sung-Sheng, Hsiao, I-Chun, Tsai, Dian-Je, Lee, Meng-Han, Chen, Mike Y. and Hung, Yi-Ping (2011): Clip-on gadgets: expanding multi-touch interaction area with unpowered tactile controls. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 367-372.

Virtual keyboards and controls, commonly used on mobile multi-touch devices, occlude content of interest and do not provide tactile feedback. Clip-on Gadgets solve these issues by extending the interaction area of multi-touch devices with physical controllers. Clip-on Gadgets use only conductive materials to map user input on the controllers to touch points on the edges of screens; therefore, they are battery-free, lightweight, and low-cost. In addition, they can be used in combination with multi-touch gestures. We present several hardware designs and a software toolkit, which enable users to simply attach Clip-on Gadgets to an edge of a device and start interacting with it.

© All rights reserved Yu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Added

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/i-chun_hsiao.html
Jul 09

The evolution of HCI technology is a coevolution of HCI tasks and HCI artifacts: A task implicitly sets requirements for the development of artifacts to support; an artifact suggests possibilities and introduces constraints that often radically redefine the task for which the artifact was originally developed. [...] This dynamic relation, the task-artifact cycle, circumscribes the development activities of human-computer interaction

-- John M. Carroll, Wendy A. Kellogg, and Mary Beth Rosson in "The Task-Artifact Cycle" in Designing Interaction (1992)

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!