Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2012
Pub. count:39
Number of co-authors:66



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gregory D. Abowd:15
Khai N. Truong:10
Julie A. Kientz:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Gillian R. Hayes's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Paul Dourish:96
Anind K. Dey:71
 
 
 

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Gillian R. Hayes

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Publications by Gillian R. Hayes (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Hirano, Sen H., Truong, Khai N. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2012): uSmell: a gas sensor system to classify odors in natural, uncontrolled environments. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 657-658.

Smell can be used to infer quite a bit of context about environments. Previous research primarily has shown that gas sensors can be used to discriminate accurately between odors when used in testing chambers. However, potential real-world applications require these sensors to perform an analysis in uncontrolled environments, which can be challenging. In this poster, we present our gas sensor system, called uSmell, to address these challenges. This system has the potential to improve context-aware applications, such as lifelogging and assisted living.

© All rights reserved Hirano et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Brubaker, Jed R. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): "We will never forget you [online]": an empirical investigation of post-mortem MySpace comments. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 123-132.

The proliferation of social network sites has resulted in an increasing number of profiles representing deceased users. In this paper, we present the results of a mixed-methods empirical study of 205,068 comments posted to 1,369 MySpace profiles of users who have died. Our results reveal interesting practices surrounding issues of authorship and audience, temporal patterns in posting, and continued social networking with the dead. These results suggest that post-mortem commenting behavior blends memorializing practices with existing practices and communication patterns for social network sites. We conclude by outlining future directions for research and implications for the understanding and use of social network sites in light of a deeper understanding of post-mortem comments.

© All rights reserved Brubaker and Hayes and/or their publisher

 
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Brubaker, Jed R. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): SELECT * FROM USER: infrastructure and socio-technical representation. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 369-378.

As use of, and experiences with, social media continue to grow, the systems of representation that underlie their use become increasingly influential. In this paper, we present results from empirical studies of two online communities-Facebook and craigslist Missed Connections-that highlight the ways in which this underlying infrastructure and the user practices on these sites are inherently intertwined. We make particular use of a framework first introduced by Agre that focuses on the influence of eight underlying features of computing practice: ontology, standards, instrumentation, authentication, interpretation, selection, bias, and performance. The results of this analysis indicate how representational systems do more than simply represent the physical world; they are deeply intertwined with the social and material practices of everyday life.

© All rights reserved Brubaker and Hayes and/or their publisher

 
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Liu, Leslie S., Hirano, Sen H., Tentori, Monica, Cheng, Karen G., George, Sheba, Park, Sun Young and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): Improving communication and social support for caregivers of high-risk infants through mobile technologies. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 475-484.

Upon leaving the hospital, parents of high-risk infants experience a variety of challenges in providing care at home. In this work, we present results from a qualitative study to understand the role of social interaction and information-sharing surrounding high-risk infants among both home caregivers and health professionals. These results demonstrate challenges in communication and social support for caregivers of these infants. Based on these results, we present design guidelines for collaborative communication technologies for this population and a prototype system design that demonstrates how these design guidelines might be met in a mobile application. Finally, we discuss how collaborative technologies can serve to improve communication with professionals as well as provide much-needed social support.

© All rights reserved Liu et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cramer, Meg, Hirano, Sen H., Tentori, Monica, Yeganyan, Michael T. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): Classroom-based assistive technology: collective use of interactive visual schedules by students with autism. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1-10.

vSked is an interactive and collaborative assistive technology for students with autism, combining visual schedules, choice boards, and a token-based reward system into an integrated classroom system. In this paper, we present the results of a study of three deployments of vSked over the course of a year in two autism classrooms. The results of our study demonstrate that vSked can promote student independence, reduce the quantity of educator-initiated prompts, encourage consistency and predictability, reduce the time required to transition from one activity to another. The findings from this study reveal practices surrounding the use of assistive technologies in classrooms and highlight important considerations for both the design and the evaluation of assistive technologies in the future, especially those destined for classroom use.

© All rights reserved Cramer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Nguyen, David H., Bedford, Aurora, Bretana, Alexander Gerard and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): Situating the concern for information privacy through an empirical study of responses to video recording. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3207-3216.

In this paper, we present the results of an empirical study of perceptions towards pervasive video recording. We describe a commonly used model for understanding information privacy, the Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) model, and present the ways that this model and its associated questionnaire can shed light on information privacy concerns about pervasive and ubiquitous computing technologies. Specifically, the CFIP model encourages analysis of data across four facets of experience: the collection of personal data, the risk of improper access, the potential for unauthorized secondary use, and the challenge of preventing or correcting errors in the data. We further identify areas not well handled by this model of information privacy and suggest avenues for future work, including research on how and when to notify people about recording technologies, awareness of data provenance and leakage, and understanding of and access to the data assemblage being created about individuals.

© All rights reserved Nguyen et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mentis, Helena M., Thimbleby, Harold, Kientz, Julie A., Hayes, Gillian R. and Reddy, Madhu (2011): Interactive technologies for health special interest group. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 519-522.

Health and how to support it with interactive computer systems, networks, and devices is a global and, for many countries, an explicit national priority. Significant interest in issues related to interactive systems for health has been demonstrated repeatedly within SIGCHI. A community focused on health started in 2010, fostering collaboration and dissemination of research findings as well as bridging with practitioners. As part of this community's on-going efforts, we will hold a special interest group session during ACM CHI 2011 to discuss, prioritize, and promote some of these most pressing issues facing the community.

© All rights reserved Mentis et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Liu, Leslie S., Shih, Patrick C. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): Barriers to the adoption and use of personal health record systems. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 363-370.

Personal health records (PHR) have enormous potential to improve both documentation of health information and patient care. The adoption of these systems, however, has been relatively slow. In this work, we used a multi-method approach to evaluate PHR systems. We interviewed potential end users -- clinicians and patients -- and conducted evaluations with patients and caregivers as well as a heuristic evaluation with HCI experts. In these studies, we focused on three PHR systems: Google Health, Microsoft HealthVault, and WorldMedCard. Our results demonstrate that both usability concerns and socio-cultural influences are barriers to PHR adoption and use. In this paper, we present those results as well as reflect on how both PHR designers and developers might address these issues now and throughout the design cycle.

© All rights reserved Liu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lindtner, Silvia, Chen, Judy, Hayes, Gillian R. and Dourish, Paul (2011): Towards a framework of publics: Re-encountering media sharing and its user. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), 18 (2) .

Design and evaluation of user-generated media production and sharing in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) often focus on formal and informal media sharing, such as communication within social networks, automatic notifications of activities, and the exchange of digital artifacts. However, conceptual tools for understanding how people relate to the audiences they reach through these systems are limited. The increasing interest in user-generated content in HCI demands the infusion of new methods and theories that explicitly engage the construction and use of media within and among large groups of individuals and systems. In this paper, we suggest that the notion of “publics,” drawn from media theory, provides useful insights into user-driven, social, and cultural forms of technology use and digital content creation. We illustrate this by employing the notion of publics to the findings from a two-month deployment of a mobile photo sharing platform in a youth housing community. The results of this empirical work coupled with a theoretical examination of publics stimulate reflection on prevailing interpretations of user-designer-reader roles. The paper provides an outlook for potentially new and productive ways of understanding interdependencies within those activities. Implications that can be drawn from this work concern the role of digital media creation and sharing for the formation of collectives and how people position themselves collectively in relation to larger social groups and societal norms. The analysis suggests fruitful crossovers among HCI, Media Theory and New Media Research by approaching the user as both consumer and producer of digital content.

© All rights reserved Lindtner et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Semi-structured qualitative studies: [/encyclopedia/semi-structured_qualitative_studies.html]


 
2010
 
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Tentori, Monica and Hayes, Gillian R. (2010): Designing for interaction immediacy to enhance social skills of children with autism. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 51-60.

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder often require therapeutic interventions to support engagement in effective social interactions. In this paper, we present the results of a study conducted in three public schools that use an educational and behavioral intervention for the instruction of social skills in changing situational contexts. The results of this study led to the concept of interaction immediacy to help children maintain appropriate spatial boundaries, reply to conversation initiators, disengage appropriately at the end of an interaction, and identify potential communication partners. We describe design principles for Ubicomp technologies to support interaction immediacy and present an example design. The contribution of this work is twofold. First, we present an understanding of social skills in mobile and dynamic contexts. Second, we introduce the concept of interaction immediacy and show its effectiveness as a guiding principle for the design of Ubicomp applications.

© All rights reserved Tentori and Hayes and/or their publisher

 
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Hirano, Sen H., Yeganyan, Michael T., Marcu, Gabriela, Nguyen, David H., Boyd, Lou Anne and Hayes, Gillian R. (2010): vSked: evaluation of a system to support classroom activities for children with autism. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1633-1642.

Visual schedules -- the use of symbols to represent a series of activities or steps -- have been successfully used by caregivers to help children with autism to understand, structure, and predict activities in their daily lives. Building from in-depth fieldwork and participatory design sessions, we developed vSked, an interactive and collaborative visual scheduling system designed for elementary school classrooms. We evaluated vSked in situ in one autism-specific classroom over three weeks. In this paper, we present the design principles, technical solution, and results from this successful deployment. Use of vSked resulted in reductions in staff effort required to use visual supports. vSked also resulted in improvements in the perceived quality and quantity of communication and social interactions in the classroom.

© All rights reserved Hirano et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yeganyan, Michael T., Cramer, Meg, Boyd, Lou Anne and Hayes, Gillian R. (2010): vSked: an interactive visual schedule system for use in classrooms for children with autism. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 319-322.

Children with autism often experience substantial challenges in understanding, structuring, and predicting the activities in their daily lives. The use of symbols to represent a series of activities, also known as visual schedules, have been shown to be an effective intervention technique for helping individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. In this paper, we describe the design and technical architecture for vSked, an interactive visual scheduling tool that allows group interactivity with content generated through end-user programming. We also outline a scenario that demonstrates how vSked extends the benefits of traditional visual schedules through both interactivity and automatic logging of use. This scenario also indicates the type of experience a user might have during a demonstration session.

© All rights reserved Yeganyan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Tan, Desney S. and Wilcox, Lauren (eds.) Proceedings of the Workshop on Interactive Systems in Healthcare 10-11 April, 2010, Atlanta, USA.

 
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Mankoff, Jennifer, Hayes, Gillian R. and Kasnitz, Devva (2010): Disability studies as a source of critical inquiry for the field of assistive technology. In: Twelfth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2010. pp. 3-10.

Disability studies and assistive technology are two related fields that have long shared common goals -- understanding the experience of disability and identifying and addressing relevant issues. Despite these common goals, there are some important differences in what professionals in these fields consider problems, perhaps related to the lack of connection between the fields. To help bridge this gap, we review some of the key literature in disability studies. We present case studies of two research projects in assistive technology and discuss how the field of disability studies influenced that work, led us to identify new or different problems relevant to the field of assistive technology, and helped us to think in new ways about the research process and its impact on the experiences of individuals who live with disability. We also discuss how the field of disability studies has influenced our teaching and highlight some of the key publications and publication venues from which our community may want to draw more deeply in the future.

© All rights reserved Mankoff et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Shih, Patrick C., Nguyen, David H., Hirano, Sen H., Redmiles, David F. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2009): GroupMind: supporting idea generation through a collaborative mind-mapping tool. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 139-148.

Collaborative brainstorming can be a challenging but important part of creative group problem solving. Mind-mapping has the potential to enhance the brainstorming process but has its own challenges when used in a group. We introduce GroupMind, a collaborative mind-mapping tool that addresses these challenges and opens new opportunities for creative teamwork, including brainstorming. We present a semi-controlled evaluation of GroupMind and its impact on teamwork, problem solving and collaboration for brainstorming activities. GroupMind performs better than using a traditional whiteboard in both interaction group and nominal group settings for the task involving memory recall. The hierarchical mind-map structure also imposes important framing effects on group dynamics and idea organization during the brainstorming process. We also present design ideas to assist in the development of future tools to support creative problem solving in groups.

© All rights reserved Shih et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Gardere, Lamar M., Abowd, Gregory D. and Truong, Khai N. (2008): CareLog: a selective archiving tool for behavior management in schools. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 685-694.

Identifying the function of problem behavior can lead to the development of more effective interventions. One way to identify the function is through functional behavior assessment (FBA). Teachers conduct FBA in schools. However, the task load of recording the data manually is high, and the challenge of accurately identifying antecedents and consequences is significant while interacting with students. These issues often result in imperfect information capture. CareLog allows teachers more easily to conduct FBAs and enhances the capture of relevant information. In this paper, we describe the design process that led to five design principles that governed the development of CareLog. We present results from a five-month, quasi-controlled study aimed at validating those design principles. We reflect on how various constraints imposed by special education settings impact the design and evaluation process for HCI practitioners and researchers.

© All rights reserved Hayes et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dourish, Paul, Hayes, Gillian R., Irani, Lilly, Lee, Charlotte P., Lindtner, Silvia, Nardi, Bonnie A., Patterson, Donald J. and Tomlinson, Bill (2008): Informatics at UC Irvine. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3651-3656.

Computer Science, as a single discipline, can no longer speak to the broad relevance of digital technologies in society. The Department of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Irvine, serves as the institutional home for research on relationships between technological, organizational, and social aspects of information technology. Here, we describe the research landscape of the Department of Informatics and its relation to the diverse field of Human-Computer Interaction.

© All rights reserved Dourish et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Irani, Lilly C., Hayes, Gillian R. and Dourish, Paul (2008): Situated practices of looking: visual practice in an online world. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 187-196.

Graphical virtual worlds are increasingly significant sites of collaborative interaction. Many argue that the simulation of the everyday environment makes them particularly effective for collaboration. Based on a study of visual practice in Second Life, we argue: first, that the practice of looking is more varied than it might at first seem; second, that we need to look beyond the virtual in understanding virtual worlds; and third, that implementations blend interactional practice. We suggest that the value of virtual worlds as sites of collaboration might lie more in their richness and openness to appropriation than in their simulation of everyday interaction.

© All rights reserved Irani et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Patterson, Donald J., Monibi, Mohamad and Kaufman, Samuel J. (2008): Interactive and intelligent visual communication systems. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 65-68.

Interventions to support children with cognitive and social developmental disabilities often include visual elements. Use of visual artifacts has been shown to increase the communication and understanding levels of children with disabilities. We describe a research agenda for expanding these capabilities using interactive, collaborative and intelligent systems.

© All rights reserved Hayes et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Monibi, Mohamad and Hayes, Gillian R. (2008): Mocotos: mobile communications tools for children with special needs. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 121-124.

Children with special needs often struggle to communicate about even the most basic of concepts. For children who cannot verbally communicate, augmentative visual communications tools can enable them to get their needs met, to socialize, and more. Despite these benefits, the tools currently available have many shortcomings. In this paper, we present results from a preliminary formative study focused on understanding current tools, and determine needs for the design of new tools. We also present the design of Mocotos, a new class of mobile communications tools for children with special needs.

© All rights reserved Monibi and Hayes and/or ACM Press

 
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Noack, Nicholas, Lindtner, Silvia, Nguyen, Josef and Hayes, Gillian R. (2008): LoRy: a locative story game to encourage playful and social learning. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 169-170.

In this paper, we introduce LoRy, a system for an interactive story telling game that engages children in reflective ways on issues around healthy nutrition. LoRy provides distributed information from different perspectives in a ubiquitous computing environment where children can explore, gather, combine, and reconfigure information.

© All rights reserved Noack et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Nguyen, David H., Kobsa, Alfred and Hayes, Gillian R. (2008): An empirical investigation of concerns of everyday tracking and recording technologies. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 182-191.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R. and Dey, Anind K. (2008): The Pervasive 2007 Workshops. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (1) pp. 85-88.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Abowd, Gregory D., Davis, John S., Blount, Marion, Ebling, Maria and Mynatt, Elizabeth D. (2008): Opportunities for Pervasive Computing in Chronic Cancer Care. In: Indulska, Jadwiga, Patterson, Donald J., Rodden, Tom and Ott, Max (eds.) Pervasive 2008 - Pervasive Computing, 6th International Conference May 19-22, 2008, Sydney, Australia. pp. 262-279.

2007
 
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Kientz, Julie, Arriaga, Rosa I., Chetty, Marshini, Hayes, Gillian R., Richardson, Jahmeilah, Patel, Shwetak N. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2007): Grow and know: understanding record-keeping needs for tracking the development of young children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1351-1360.

From birth through age five, children undergo rapid development and learn skills that will influence them their entire lives. Regular visits to the pediatrician and detailed record-keeping can ensure that children are progressing and can identify early warning signs of developmental delay or disability. However, new parents are often overwhelmed with new responsibilities, and we believe there is an opportunity for computing technology to assist in this process. In this paper, we present a qualitative study aimed at uncovering some specific needs for record-keeping and analysis for new parents and their network of caregivers. Through interviews and focus groups, we have confirmed assumptions about the rationales parents have and the functions required for using technology for record-keeping. We also identify new themes, potential prototypes, and design guidelines for this domain.

© All rights reserved Kientz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Poole, Erika Shehan, Iachello, Giovanni, Patel, Shwetak N., Grimes, Andrea, Abowd, Gregory D. and Truong, Khai N. (2007): Physical, Social, and Experiential Knowledge in Pervasive Computing Environments. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (4) pp. 56-63.

 
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Kientz, Julie A., Hayes, Gillian R., Westeyn, Tracy L., Starner, Thad and Abowd, Gregory D. (2007): Pervasive Computing and Autism: Assisting Caregivers of Children with Special Needs. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (1) pp. 28-35.

2006
 
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Hayes, Gillian R. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): Tensions in designing capture technologies for an evidence-based care community. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 937-946.

Evidence-based care is an increasingly popular process for long term diagnosis and monitoring of education and healthcare disabilities. Because this evidence must also be collected in everyday life, it is a technique that can greatly benefit from automated capture technologies. These solutions, however, can raise significant concerns about privacy, control, and surveillance. In this paper, we present an analysis of these concerns with regard to evidence-based care. This analysis underscores the need to consider community-based risk and reward analyses in addition to the traditionally used analyses for individual users when designing socially appropriate technologies.

© All rights reserved Hayes and Abowd and/or ACM Press

 
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Iachello, Giovanni, Truong, Khai N., Abowd, Gregory D., Hayes, Gillian R. and Stevens, Molly (2006): Prototyping and sampling experience to evaluate ubiquitous computing privacy in the real world. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 1009-1018.

We developed an inquiry technique, which we called "paratype," based on experience prototyping and event-contingent experience sampling, to survey people in real-life situations about ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) technology. We used this tool to probe the opinions of the conversation partners of users of the Personal Audio Loop, a memory aid that can have a strong impact on their privacy. We present the findings of this study and their implications, specifically the need to broaden public awareness of ubicomp applications and the unfitness of traditional data protection guidelines for tackling the privacy issues of many ubicomp applications. We also point out benefits and methodological issues of paratypes and discuss why they are particularly fit for studying certain classes of mobile and ubicomp applications.

© All rights reserved Iachello et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wyche, Susan P., Hayes, Gillian R., Harvel, Lonnie D. and Grinter, Rebecca E. (2006): Technology in spiritual formation: an exploratory study of computer mediated religious communications. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 199-208.

In this paper, we report findings from a study of American Christian ministers' uses of technologies in religious practices. We focus on the use of technologies for spiritual purposes as opposed to pragmatic and logistical, but report on all. We present results about the uses of technologies in three aspects of religious work: religious study and reflection, church services, and pastoral care. We end by examining how the collaborative religious uses of technologies cross and blend work and personal life.

© All rights reserved Wyche et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kientz, Julie, Hayes, Gillian R., Abowd, Gregory D. and Grinter, Rebecca E. (2006): From the war room to the living room: decision support for home-based therapy teams. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 209-218.

Teams of therapists often provide targeted interventions for children with developmental disabilities. A common practice in these cases is one-on-one interaction between a therapist and the child together with occasional group meetings of the therapists to discuss progress and make informed decisions to modify the intervention plan. We designed a system called Abaris to support this form of collaborative decision-making for a particular intervention popular in the treatment of children with autism. Our system allows for the simultaneous use of trending data across therapy sessions and detailed session data that is automatically integrated with highly indexed video. We discuss the impact this system had on the team dynamics, the amount of collaboration, and the effect it had on the team using evidence and videos to make decisions about the care of the child.

© All rights reserved Kientz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Truong, Khai N., Hayes, Gillian R. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): Storyboarding: an empirical determination of best practices and effective guidelines. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 12-21.

Storyboarding is a common technique in HCI and design for demonstrating system interfaces and contexts of use. Despite its recognized benefits, novice designers still encounter challenges in the creation of storyboards. Furthermore, as computing becomes increasingly integrated into the environment, blurring the distinction between the system and its surrounding context, it is imperative to depict context explicitly in storyboards. In this paper, we present two formative studies designed to uncover the important elements of storyboards. These elements include the use of text, inclusion of people, level of detail, number of panels, and representation of the passage of time. We further present an empirical study to assess the effects of these elements on the understanding and enjoyment of storyboard consumers. Finally, we demonstrate how these guidelines were successfully used in an undergraduate HCI class.

© All rights reserved Truong et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Design 4 All: [/encyclopedia/design_4_all.html]


 
 
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Patel, Shwetak N., Kientz, Julie A., Hayes, Gillian R., Bhat, Sooraj and Abowd, Gregory D. (2006): Farther Than You May Think: An Empirical Investigation of the Proximity of Users to Their Mobile Phones. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 123-140.

2005
 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Truong, Khai N., Abowd, Gregory D. and Pering, Trevor (2005): Experience buffers: a socially appropriate, selective archiving tool for evidence-based care. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1435-1438.

Diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of interventions for children with autism can profit most when caregivers have substantial amounts of data they can easily record and review as evidence of specific observed behaviors over time. Through our work with one prototype system and interviews with caregivers, we have recognized the importance of socially appropriate ways to add rich data to the information recorded by caregivers. Analysts must be able to view incidents as they occurred without unnecessarily burdening caregivers and other children with always-on recording of data about them. In this paper, we introduce experience buffers, a collection of capture services embedded in an environment that, though always on and available, require explicit user action to store an experience.. This creates a way to balance the social, technical, and practical concerns of capture applications.

© All rights reserved Hayes et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kientz, Julie A., Boring, Sebastian, Abowd, Gregory D. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2005): Abaris: Evaluating Automated Capture Applied to Structured Autism Interventions. In: Beigl, Michael, Intille, Stephen S., Rekimoto, Jun and Tokuda, Hideyuki (eds.) UbiComp 2005 Ubiquitous Computing - 7th International Conference September 11-14, 2005, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 323-339.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R. and Truong, Khai N. (2005): Autism, environmental buffers, and wearable servers. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (2) pp. 14-17.

 
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Abowd, Gregory D., Hayes, Gillian R., Iachello, Giovanni, Kientz, Julie A., Patel, Shwetak N., Stevens, Molly M. and Truong, Khai N. (2005): Prototypes and paratypes: designing mobile and ubiquitous computing applications. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 67-73.

2004
 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Patel, Shwetak N., Truong, Khai N., Iachello, Giovanni, Kientz, Julie A., Farmer, Rob and Abowd, Gregory D. (2004): The Personal Audio Loop: Designing a Ubiquitous Audio-Based Memory Aid. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 168-179.

 
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Hayes, Gillian R., Kientz, Julie A., Truong, Khai N., White, David R., Abowd, Gregory D. and Pering, Trevor (2004): Designing Capture Applications to Support the Education of Children with Autism. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 161-178.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/gillian_r__hayes.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2012
Pub. count:39
Number of co-authors:66



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gregory D. Abowd:15
Khai N. Truong:10
Julie A. Kientz:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Gillian R. Hayes's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Paul Dourish:96
Anind K. Dey:71
 
 
 

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