Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:58
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Les Nelson:11
David N. Snowdon:5
Laurent Denoue:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Elizabeth F. Churchill's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Tom Rodden:106
Bill Buxton:78
 
 
 

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Elizabeth F. Churchill

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Has also published under the name of:
"Elizabeth Churchill"

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Publications by Elizabeth F. Churchill (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Antin, Judd, de S, Marco and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2012): Local experts and online review sites. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 55-58. Available online

Sites such as Yelp and Yahoo! Local provide a valuable source of knowledge about both new and familiar places. However, they represent an indirect source of local knowledge. Many are likely to prefer learning from the people who know their neighborhoods best: local experts. In this study of online review websites (ORWs), we examine attitudes about local knowledge and personal investment in local neighborhoods. We explore how these and other beliefs about local neighborhoods and local content may be related to interactions with ORWs. Finally, we argue that our findings suggest several important directions for future research and design investigations.

© All rights reserved Antin et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Shamma, David A., Kennedy, Lyndon and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2011): Peaks and persistence: modeling the shape of microblog conversations. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 355-358. Available online

A microblogged stream is delivered over time, providing an ongoing commentary of topics, trends, and issues. In this article, we present two methods of finding temporal topics within these Twitter streams. Using a normalized term frequency, we demonstrate how an effective table of contents can be extracted by finding localized "peaky topics". Second, we find "persistent conversations" which have a lower general salience but sustain and persist over the tweet corpus, in effect the whispering conversation that lingers in the background. These methods are demonstrated on a Twitter corpus of 53,000 tweets and a second Twitter corpus of 1.1 million tweets; the methods are generalizable to apply to any normalized scoring metric across a temporal corpus. We propose our method's implications on social media research and systems from a textual and social network analysis perspective.

© All rights reserved Shamma et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Farnham, Shelly D. and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2011): Faceted identity, faceted lives: social and technical issues with being yourself online. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 359-368. Available online

This paper explores key issues people experience managing personal boundaries within and across social technologies. We look in particular at email and online social networks. We offer a theoretical framework for understanding the errors in assumptions about the singularity of identity that are currently inscribed into the sharing models of social technology systems. Through a questionnaire study we examine how people facet their identities and their lives, and how these facets are expressed through use of email and Facebook. We found family was an extremely important context for sharing online, and that email was still a preferred form of communication for private sharing across facets of life. Single, working men had the highest level of incompatible facets, and a higher level of facet incompatibility was correlated with increased email usage and worry about sharing in the context of social networks.

© All rights reserved Farnham and Churchill and/or their publisher

 
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Moore, Robert J., Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Kantamneni, Raj Gopal Prasad (2011): Three sequential positions of query repair in interactions with internet search engines. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 415-424. Available online

Internet search engines display understanding or misunderstanding of user intent in and through the particular batches of results they retrieve and their perceived relevance. Yet understanding is not simply an automatic outcome but a joint interactional achievement between human and machine. If potential troubles with search queries emerge, either the user or the search engine may initiate repair on the query in ways that resemble repair in human conversation as described in conversation analysis. Users can repair their own queries in first or third position, while search engines can initiate repair from second position. However search-engine interactions currently contain no fourth-position repair. Finally search engines may also complete queries collaboratively with users in ways that are similar to but distinct from repair. In this study we examine interactions between users and search engines using a novel approach we call "computer interaction analysis," which utilizes eye-tracking screen video and a novel notation scheme for transcribing it.

© All rights reserved Moore et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Antin, Judd, Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Chen, Bee-Chung (2011): Workshop on online reputation: context, privacy, and reputation management. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2011. pp. 321-322. Available online

In this workshop we bring together researchers and practitioners from diverse disciplines to discuss the future of online reputation systems. Our goal is to combine social and technical perspectives to address three challenges: (1) the social challenges around reputation, privacy, and online identity, (2) the technical challenges around designing adaptable reputation systems which cater to users' privacy concerns, and (3) the user experience challenges around transparency and the design or reputation management tools.

© All rights reserved Antin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Yew, Jude, Shamma, David A. and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2011): Knowing funny: genre perception and categorization in social video sharing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 297-306. Available online

Categorization of online videos is often treated as a tag suggestion task; tags can be generated by individuals or by machine classification. In this paper, we suggest categorization can be determined socially, based on people's interactions around media content without recourse to metadata that are intrinsic to the media object itself. This work bridges the gap between the human perception of genre and automatic categorization of genre in classifying online videos. We present findings from two internet surveys and from follow-up interviews where we address how people determine genre classification for videos and how social framing of video content can alter the perception and categorization of that content. From these findings, we train a Naive Bayes classifier to predict genre categories. The trained classifier achieved 82% accuracy using only social action data, without the use of content or media-specific metadata. We conclude with implications on how we categorize and organize media online as well as what our findings mean for designing and building future tools and interaction experiences.

© All rights reserved Yew et al. and/or their publisher

 
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de S, Marco, Antin, Judd, Shamma, David and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2011): Mobile augmented reality: video prototyping. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1897-1902. Available online

As mobile devices become more powerful, new features and user experiences become possible. A good example of such experiences is Augmented reality (AR). Achieved through the combination of current smart-phones processing capabilities and their embedded cameras, AR is a growing trend that offers an interesting approach for a wide variety of applications. However, coupling this new approach to the already demanding design process that characterizes mobile devices, further extends challenges to designers and developers. In this paper we present a preliminary study on prototyping and evaluation techniques for mobile AR. A short experiment within the context of an ongoing design project and initial results are presented along with some resulting guidelines.

© All rights reserved de S et al. and/or their publisher

 
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de S, Marco, Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Isbister, Katherine (2011): Mobile augmented reality: design issues and opportunities. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 749-752. Available online

With the rapid evolution of mobile devices, smart-phones in particular, comes the ability to create new experiences that enhance the way we see, interact, and express ourselves, within the world that surrounds us. We can blend data from our senses and our devices in myriad ways that simply weren't possible before. This workshop explores the current and future state of Mobile Augmented Reality. We will promote discussion about issues and opportunities in the space. We will explore potential for innovation and opportunities for collaboration between researchers working on augmented reality. We envision a lively discussion on the different approaches, challenges and benefits that may arise from the use of mobile Augmented Reality in the near future from an HCI perspective. We also aim at fostering new collaborations and establishing a research agenda within the field of mobile augmented reality.

© All rights reserved de S et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Broder, Andrei, Churchill, Elizabeth F., Hearst, Marti, Pell, Barney, Raghavan, Prabhakar and Tomkins, Andrew (2010): Search is dead!: long live search. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2010. pp. 1337-1338. Available online

Back in the heady days of 1999 and WWW8 (Toronto) we held a panel titled "Finding Anything in the Billion Page Web: Are Algorithms the Key?" In retrospect the answer to this question seems laughably obvious -- the search industry has burgeoned on a foundation of algorithms, cloud computing and machine learning. As we move into the second decade of this millennium, we are confronted with a dizzying array of new paradigms for finding content, including social networks and location-based search and advertising. This panel pulls together senior experts from academia and the major search principals to debate whether search will continue to look anything like the 2-keywords-give-10-blue-links paradigm that Google has popularized. What do emerging approaches and paradigms -- natural language search, social search, location-based search -- mean for the future of search in general?

© All rights reserved Broder et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2010): Ps AND Qs: Socializing at cross purposes. In Interactions, 17 (1) pp. 62-65. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2010): Sugared puppy-dog tails: gender and design. In Interactions, 17 (2) pp. 52-56. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2010): Enticing engagement. In Interactions, 17 (3) pp. 82-87. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2010): Today's flâneur: from HCI to place-based interaction and human-place interaction. In Interactions, 17 (4) pp. 62-66. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2010): The (anti) social net. In Interactions, 17 (5) pp. 22-25. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2010): Rat, rational, or seething cauldron of desire: designing the shopper. In Interactions, 17 (6) pp. 80-83. Available online

2009
 
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Torrey, Cristen, Churchill, Elizabeth F. and McDonald, David W. (2009): Learning how: the search for craft knowledge on the internet. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1371-1380. Available online

Communicating the subtleties of a craft technique, like putting a zipper into a garment or throwing a clay pot, can be challenging even when working side by side. Yet How-To content -- including text, images, animations, and videos -- is available online for a wide variety of crafts. We interviewed people engaged in various crafts to investigate how online resources contributed to their craft practice. We found that participants sought creative inspiration as well as technical clarification online. In this domain, keyword search can be difficult, so supplemental strategies are used. Participants sought information iteratively, because they often needed to enact their knowledge in order to evaluate it. Our description of people learning how allows us to elaborate existing understandings of information-seeking behavior by considering how search originates and is evaluated in knowledge domains involving physical objects and physical processes.

© All rights reserved Torrey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2009): Givin' you more of what you're funkin' for: DJs and the Internet. In Interactions, 16 (1) pp. 20-24. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2009): On trusting your socks to find each other. In Interactions, 16 (2) pp. 32-36. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2009): Digital order: just over the horizon or at the end of the rainbow?. In Interactions, 16 (3) pp. 50-53. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2009): The golden age of newsprint collides with the gilt age of internet news. In Interactions, 16 (4) pp. 70-74. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2009): Research automation as technomethodological pixie dust. In Interactions, 16 (5) pp. 40-43. Available online

2008
 
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Baecker, Ronald M., Harrison, Steve, Buxton, Bill, Poltrock, Steven and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2008): Media spaces: past visions, current realities, future promise. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2245-2248. Available online

Established researchers and practitioners active in the development and deployment of media spaces review what seemed to be promised twenty years ago, what has actually been achieved, and what we might anticipate over the next twenty years.

© All rights reserved Baecker et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Nelson, Les, Smetters, Diana and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2008): Keyholes: selective sharing in close collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2443-2452. Available online

Documents are changing, becoming more malleable. Content operations progress, from command lines to annotation and tagging. Our studies reveal that people in practice share entire documents when portions would suffice. Readers hunt for relevant information. Authors describe laborious processes of selective sharing and redaction. Overload and loss of focus arises. We describe Keyholes, content annotations where authors or readers enter meta-data within a document to indicate what gets shared, with whom, and why. We argue that leveraging established practices (tags, social annotation, and command-line automation) clashes with CHI notions of technical contribution, but creates new social dynamism within document texts.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Goodman, Elizabeth S. (2008): Mapchat: conversing in place. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3165-3170. Available online

Arranging a social meeting often involves collaborative consideration of events, locations and time. In studying online dating, we observed people using multiple information sources and applications to arrange suitable activities and rendezvous locations/times. Would-be socializers then exchange URLs and discuss ideas until a decision is made. To reduce the work of collaborative event planning, we have designed MapChat, a novel, map-based combination of existing services. MapChat allows people to chat synchronously over an interactive map, transforming online maps into shared digital environments for place/location exploration and rendezvous negotiation.

© All rights reserved Churchill and Goodman and/or ACM Press

 
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Gilmore, David J., Cockton, Gilbert, Churchill, Elizabeth F., Kujala, Sari, Henderson, Austin and Hammontree, Monty (2008): Values, value and worth: their relationship to HCI?. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3933-3936. Available online

This workshop explores the territory of 'value-centered HCI' with the intention of freeing us from the tricky complexity of this topic and the multiple meanings of the words 'value' and 'values'.

© All rights reserved Gilmore et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les and Smetters, Diana K. (2008): Useful Computer Security. In IEEE Internet Computing, 12 (3) pp. 10-12. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2008): Keep your hair on: designed and emergent interactions for graphical virtual worlds. In Interactions, 15 (3) pp. 38-41. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2008): Maps and moralities, blanks and beasties. In Interactions, 15 (4) pp. 40-43. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Vanderbeeken, Mark (2008): Open, closed, or ajar?: Content access and interactions. In Interactions, 15 (5) pp. 42-44. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2008): Of candied herbs and happy babies: seeking and searching on your own terms. In Interactions, 15 (6) pp. 46-49. Available online

 
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Jones, M. Cameron, Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Twidale, Michael B. (2008): Mashing up visual languages and web mash-ups. In: VL-HCC 2008 - IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 15-19 September, 2008, Herrsching am Ammersee, Germany. pp. 143-146. Available online

2007
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Nelson, Les (2007): Interactive Community Bulletin Boards as Conversational Hubs and Sites for Playful Visual Repartee. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 76. Available online

2005
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Sykes, Jonathan and Zazelenchuk, Todd (2005): Recognizing student designers: ACM CHI's Student Design Competition. In Interactions, 12 (5) pp. 16-19.

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Halverson, Christine A. (2005): Guest Editors' Introduction: Social Networks and Social Networking. In IEEE Internet Computing, 9 (5) pp. 14-19. Available online

2004
 
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Yamada, Toshiya, Shingu, Jun, Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les, Helfman, Jonathan and Murphy, Paul (2004): Who cares?: reflecting who is reading what on distributed community bulletin boards. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 109-118. Available online

In this paper, we describe the YeTi information sharing system that has been designed to foster community building through informal digital content sharing. The YeTi system is a general information parsing, hosting and distribution infrastructure, with interfaces designed for individual and public content reading. In this paper we describe the YeTi public display interface, with a particular focus on tools we have designed to provide lightweight awareness of others\' interactions with posted content. Our tools augment content with metadata that reflect people\'s reading of content - captured video clips of who\'s reading and interacting with content, tools to allow people to leave explicit freehand annotations about content, and a visualization of the content access history to show when content is interacted with. Results from an initial evaluation are presented and discussed.

© All rights reserved Yamada et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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McCarthy, Joseph F., boyd, danah, Churchill, Elizabeth F., Griswold, William G., Lawley, Elizabeth and Zaner, Melora (2004): Digital backchannels in shared physical spaces: attention, intention and contention. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 550-553. Available online

There are a variety of digital tools for enabling people who are separated by time and space to communicate and collaborate on shared interests and tasks. The widespread use of some of these tools, such as instant messaging and group chat, coupled with the increasingly widespread availability of wireless access to the Internet (WiFi), have created new opportunities for using these collaboration tools by people sharing physical spaces in real time. The use of these tools to augment face-to-face meetings has created benefits for some participants and distractions-and detractions-for others. Our panelists will discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages of these emerging uses of collaborative tools.

© All rights reserved McCarthy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les, Denoue, Laurent, Helfman, Jonathan and Murphy, Paul (2004): Sharing multimedia content with interactive public displays: a case study. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 7-16. Available online

Plasma Posters are large screen, digital, interactive poster-boards situated in public spaces, designed to facilitate informal content sharing within teams, groups, organizations and communities. While interest in interactive community poster boards has grown recently, few successful examples have been reported. In this paper we describe an ongoing installation of Plasma Posters within our organization, and report qualitative and quantitative data from 20 months of use showing the Posters have become an integral part of information sharing, complementing email and Web-based sharing. Success factors include our design process, the reliability and flexibility of the technology and the social setting of our organization. We briefly describe three external installations of the Plasma Poster Network in public places. We then reflect on content posting as "information staging" and the ways in which the public space itself becomes part of the "interface" to content.

© All rights reserved Churchill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Girgensohn, Andreas, Nelson, Les and Lee, Alison (2004): Blending digital and physical spaces for ubiquitous community participation. In Communications of the ACM, 47 (2) pp. 38-44. Available online

 
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Snowdon, David N., Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Frcon, Emmanuel (2004): Inhabited Information Spaces: Living with your Data (Computer Supported Cooperative Work). Springer

2003
 
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Denoue, Laurent, Nelson, Les and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2003): A fast, interactive 3D paper-flier metaphor for digital bulletin boards. In: Proceedings of the 16th annural ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology November, 2-5, 2003, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 169-172. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Erickson, Thomas (2003): Introduction to This Special Issue on Talking About Things in Mediated Conversations. In Human-Computer Interaction, 18 (1) pp. 1-11.

 
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Nelson, Les, Denoue, Laurent and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (2003): AttrActive windows: active windows for pervasive computing applications. In: Johnson, Lewis and Andre, Elisabeth (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2003 January 12-15, 2003, Miami, Florida, USA. p. 326. Available online

We introduce the AttrActive Windows user interface, a novel approach for presenting interactive content on large screen, interactive, digital, bulletin boards. Moving away from the desktop metaphor, AttrActive Windows are dynamic, non-uniform windows that can appear in different orientations and have autonomous behaviours to attract passers-by and invite interactions.

© All rights reserved Nelson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Nelson, Les, Denoue, Laurent and Girgensohn, Andreas (2003): The Plasma Poster Network: Posting Multimedia Content in Public Places. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 599.

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Girgensohn, Andreas, Nelson, Les and Lee, Alison (2003): Weaving Between Online & Offline Community Participation. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 729.

2002
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

2001
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Snowdon, David N. and Munro, Alan J. (eds.) (2001): Collaborative Virtual Environments. Springer-Verlag

2000
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Trevor, Jonathan, Bly, Sara A., Nelson, Les and Cubranic, Davor (2000): Anchored Conversations: Chatting in the Context of a Document. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 454-461. Available online

This paper describes an application-independent tool called Anchored Conversations that brings together text-based conversations and documents. The design of Anchored Conversations is based on our observations of the use of documents and text chats in collaborative settings. We observed that chat spaces support work conversations, but they do not allow the close integration of conversations with work documents that can be seen when people are working together face-to-face. Anchored Conversations directly addresses this problem by allowing text chats to be anchored into documents. Anchored Conversations also facilitates document sharing; accepting an invitation to an anchored conversation results in the document being automatically uploaded. In addition, Anchored Conversations provides support for review, catch-up and asynchronous communications through a database. In this paper we describe motivating fieldwork, the design of Anchored Conversations, a scenario of use, and some preliminary results from a user study.

© All rights reserved Churchill et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Bly, Sara A. and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (1999): Design through matchmaking: technology in search of users. In Interactions, 6 (2) pp. 23-31. Available online

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Bly, Sara A. (1999): It's All in the Words: Supporting Work Activities with Lightweight Tools. In: Proceedings of the International ACM SIGGROUP Conference on Supporting Group Work 1999 November 14-17, 1999, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. pp. 40-49. Available online

The development of tools to support synchronous communications between non-collocated colleagues has received considerable attention in recent years. Much of the work has focused on increasing a sense of co-presence between interlocutors by supporting aspects of face-to-face conversations that go beyond mere words (e.g. gaze, postural shifts). In this regard, a design goal for many environments is the provision of as much media-richness as possible to support non-collocated communication. In this paper we present results from our most recent interviews studying the use of a text-based virtual environment to support work collaborations. We describe how such an environment, though lacking almost all the visual and auditory cues known to be important in face-to-face conversation, has played an important role in day-to-day communication. We offer a set of characteristics we feel are important to the success of this text-only tool and discuss issues emerging from its long-term use.

© All rights reserved Churchill and Bly and/or ACM Press

 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Snowdon, David N., Sullivan, Joseph W. and Golovchinsky, Gene (1999): CSCW'98 Workshop Report: Collaborative and Co-Operative Information Seeking. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (3) pp. 15-18. Available online

 
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Adams, Lia, Toomey, Lori and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (1999): Distributed Research Teams: Meeting Asynchronously in Virtual Space. In: HICSS 1999 1999. . Available online

 
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Adams, Lia, Toomey, Lori and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (1999): Distributed Research Teams: Meeting Asynchronously in Virtual Space. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 4 (4) . Available online

1998
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Snowdon, David N. and Golovchinsky, Gene (1998): Collaborative and Cooperative Information Seeking in Digital Information Environments. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 416-417. Available online

We will discuss current conceptions of collaborative and cooperative information seeking activities, and identify potential areas for future research on the design and use of digital information spaces. We wish to explore different kinds of collaboration, including asynchronous recommendation systems and synchronous collaborative search and browsing activities by non-collocated participants. Our concern is that in the absence of such a debate, systems will be designed embodying assumptions about information seeking as a solitary activity. This workshop will be of interest to researchers concerned with the design of user interfaces and systems for supporting information exploration and information seeking activities. This includes user-centered aspects of design of systems for public use (e.g. public digital libraries, the WWW) and systems for use by more focused work groups.

© All rights reserved Churchill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Snowdon, David N. and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (1998): CVE'98: Collaborative Virtual Environments. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) pp. 88-89. Available online

 
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Toomey, Lori, Adams, Lia and Churchill, Elizabeth F. (1998): Meetings in a Virtual Space: Creating a Digital Document. In: HICSS 1998 1998. pp. 236-244. Available online

1997
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F., Snowdon, Dave, Benford, Steve and Dhanda, Parmjit (1997): Using VR-VIBE: Browsing and Searching for Documents in 3D-Space. In: Smith, Michael J., Salvendy, Gavriel and Koubek, Richard J. (eds.) HCI International 1997 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 24-29, 1997, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 857-860.

 
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Holst, Shirley J., Churchill, Elizabeth F. and Gilmore, David J. (1997): Transporting Honey Bears: A Cognitive Analysis of the Effects of Interface Manipulation Style on a Constraint-Based Planning Task. In: Smith, Michael J., Salvendy, Gavriel and Koubek, Richard J. (eds.) HCI International 1997 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 24-29, 1997, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 169-172.

1994
 
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Churchill, Elizabeth F. (1994): "Gendered by Design? Information Technology and Office Systems," by E. Green, J. Owen and D. Pain. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 40 (3) pp. 567-569.

 
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