Publication statistics

Pub. period:1998-2013
Pub. count:34
Number of co-authors:23



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Christopher Baber:11
Mike Sharples:2
Andy Boud:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

David Haniff's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Christopher Baber:53
Mike Sharples:21
Alan Chamberlain:7
 
 
 

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David Haniff

Ph.D

Picture of David Haniff.
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Personal Homepage:
linkedin.com/pub/david-haniff/3/1b9/951


Current place of employment:
Pervasive Technology Lab - Community Interest Company

David Haniff has a 1st class degree in computer science, an MSc in Cogntive Science and a Ph.D in Augmented Reality. He has been a researcher at a number of institutions such as the University of Birmingham, the Open University and Loughborough University. Projects that he has worked on include wearable computing and Smart Homes. He has a number of publications presenting at International conferences. In September 2010 he has obtained a Six Sigma qualification (Green Belt Trained) and lean management at Cranfield University, UK.

 

Publications by David Haniff (bibliography)

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2013
 
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Haniff, David (2013). Subliminal Relaxation Files for Mental Health during the Night. Retrieved 13 March 2013 from Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC): http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org/Media_Player_Meditation_zip.zip

In order to aid mental health a zip file has been created with around 8 hours of play to be played throughout the night. It is below earshot so sleeping patterns are not disturbed. The files can be converted to mpg in Media Player and put on a mpg player with speakers or through headphones.

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

 
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Haniff, David, Chamberlain, Alan, Moody, Louise and De-Freitas, Sara (2013): Virtual environments for mental health issues: A review. In Journal of Metabolomics and Systems Biology, p. xxxx. Available online

Three-dimensional (3D) environments are increasingly being used to provide therapy to those suffering from mental health problems. Virtual environments can provide a safe and realistic simulation to expose patients to the cause of their problem. This paper presents a review of the use of 3D environments to assess and treat mental health problems. Within the review applications to treat mental health problems such as post-traumatic disorder, autism and phobias are described. The areas reviewed in this paper describe more recent works in the area of three-dimensional interfaces for the treatment of mental health problems. http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org/VR_and_MentalHealth.pdf

© All rights reserved Haniff et al. and/or Academic Journals

 
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Haniff, David (2013). Technology for Intrusive Thoughts. Retrieved 4 February 2014 from TILT (Therapy in Light of Technology): http://onlinetherapyinstitute.com/about-tilt-magazine/

The article demonstrates the use of technology to help treat mental health condition 'Intrusive Thoughts' (unwanted thoughts).

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

2012
 
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Haniff, David (2012). A Serious Game to Help with Depression. Retrieved 28 January 2012 from Therapy In Light of Technology (TILT): http://issuu.com/onlinetherapyinstitute/docs/tiltiss9/9

 
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Haniff, David (2012): Game for Depression. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 11 (4) pp. 82-83.

2011
 
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Haniff, David (2011): Usability Engineering and E-Health. In: Ziefle, Martina and Rocker, Carsten (eds.). "Human-Centered Design of E-Health Technologies: Concepts, Methods and Applications". Germany: pp. 41-64

The chapter initially looks at e-health systems that have been developed and in particular e-health systems that are intended to help people with mental health problems, as this is often a neglected area. Mental health issues are becoming an increasing problem and e-health system can provide a means of providing discrete information to sufferers who often feel embarrassed by their problems. Following this review of e-health systems suggestions for usability techniques such as learning styles, focus groups, card sorting and the Technology Acceptance Model are described in order for the designer of e-health systems to be aware of the tools that are available to provide a user focused development process. In addition, in order to provide innovation in the production of e-health systems a technology review is suggested to match the users complaint with the functionality of new technology. Also, case studies of e-health applications are provided, such as a paramedic application that presented treatment information to the paramedic. In order to meet demands of sensitive usability engineering in the e-health sector, the author proposes a methodology that combines technological considerations as well as human factors issues. http://www.igi-global.com/bookstore/chapter.aspx?TitleId=50780

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

 
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Haniff, David (2011). Cutting Edge Technology to Aid with Mental Health Issues. Retrieved 5 May 2011 from TILT Magazine, Therapeutic Innovations Light of Technology, May 2011, Issue 5, pp. 40-44: http://issuu.com/onlinetherapyinstitute/docs/tilt_issue5_final/40

The article examines the use of new technology such as Serious Games and Virtual Reality (VR) to help to treat people with Mental Health problems such as Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD),Phobias and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

 
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Haniff, David (2011): A Serious Game to Aid People with Depression. In: COMET 2011 Ninth Interdisciplinary Conference in relation to Communication, Medicine and Ethics June 30-July 2, 2011, University of Nottingham, UK. .

 
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Haniff, David and McNay, Steve (2011). Minutes of Focus Group on A Serious Game for Depression. Retrieved 3 January 2012 from Google: http://depressionfocusgroups.blogspot.com/

 
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Haniff, David (2011). A Serious Game to aid decision making in causes of depression. Retrieved 3 January 2012 from Mental Healthy: http://www.mentalhealthy.co.uk/news/1292-serious-game-to-aid-decision-making-in-causes-of-depression.html

 
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Haniff, David and McNay, Steve (2011). Serious Game for Triggers of Depression. Retrieved 13 March 2013 from Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC): http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org/Life_Choices_Game/deploy-to-web/main.html

A Serious Game has been created to provide advice on what to do if confronted with triggers of depression. The game has been created using Flash and was developed with help from a mental health charity in the United Kingdom.

© All rights reserved Haniff and McNay and/or their publisher

 
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Tooley, David and Haniff, David (2011). New Mind Games to Help Depression. Retrieved 4 April 2013 from Milton Keynes Business Citizen: http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org/business_citizen.jpeg

The article with the Milton Keynes Business Citizen within the United Kingdom looks at a Serious Game to help depression developed by the Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC)

© All rights reserved Tooley and Haniff and/or their publisher

 
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Haniff, David and Contibutors, Other (2011). The Use of Technology for Mental Health. Retrieved 26 April 2013 from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_and_mental_health_issues

The use of electronic and communication technologies as a therapeutic aid to healthcare practices is commonly referred to as telemedicine or eHealth. The use of such technologies as a supplement to mainstream therapies for mental disorders is an emerging mental health treatment field which, it is argued, could improve the accessibility, effectiveness and affordability of mental health care. Mental health technologies used by professionals as an adjunct to mainstream clinical practices include email, SMS, virtual reality, computer programmes, blogs, social networks, the telephone, video conferencing, computer games, instant messaging and podcasts.

© All rights reserved Haniff and Contibutors and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Haniff, David (2010): An Age Problem. In The Birmingham Magazine, (22) p. 17. Available online

The article describes the activity of the Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC), there are therefore several authors descibing their research into aging:http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/Documents/alumni/BirminghamMagazine(PDF-12MB).pdf

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or The University of Birmingham

 
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Haniff, David and Contibutors, Other (2010). Use of technology in treatment of mental disorders. Retrieved 23 March 2013 from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_and_mental_health_issues

A Wikipedia site has been created to look into the use of new technology to help treat people with mental health conditions: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_and_mental_health_issues

© All rights reserved Haniff and Contibutors and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Haniff, David (2009). Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC). Retrieved 4 April 2013 from Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC): http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org

The website describes the activity of the Pervasive Technology Lab a Community Interest Company based within the United Kingdom to explore the use of new technology to help people with mental health problems.

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

 
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Haniff, David (2009). Serious Games to Help People with Depression. Retrieved 4 April 2013 from Maybe Magazine: http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org/maybe2.pdf

The local magazine to Milton Keynes in the United Kingdom looks at Serious Games to help treat depression. The article is on page 8 of the Maybe magazine.

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

 
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Haniff, David (2009). Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC). Retrieved 25 April 2013 from Pervasive Technology Lab (CIC): http://www.pervasive-technology-lab.org/News.htm

The site describes work that can help people with mental health problems.

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or his/her publisher

2007
 
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Haniff, David (2007): Mental Health Issues and Pervasive Computing. In: Ramdumy-Ellis, Devina and Rachovides, Dorothy (eds.) The 21st British HCI Group Annual Conference - Volume 2 September 3-7, 2007, Lancaster. pp. 171-172. Available online

This poster describes work being undertaken in the use of pervasive computing for the treatment of mental health problems. The use of technology to help patients with psychological issues such as depression are explored and preliminary investigations are discussed.

© All rights reserved Haniff and/or BCS

2005
 
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Haniff, David (2005): Socio-Cognitive Engineering and Augmented Reality - Ph.D. Birmingham, UK, University Birmingham

2004
 
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Haniff, David, Kalawsky, Roy, Atkins., David and Lewins, Martin (2004): A User-Centred Approach to Design. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 3 (2) pp. 49-50. Available online

Looks at the use of Smart Homes to help the elderly, for example pressure plates by the bed to indicate movement.

© All rights reserved Haniff et al. and/or IEEE Computer Society

 
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Haniff, David, Baber, Christopher, Kalawsky, Roy, Atkins, David, Lewin, Martin and Armitage, Scott (2004): Augmented Appliances. In: The Second International Conference on Appliance Design May 11-13, 2004, Bristol UK. p. 141.

2003
 
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Haniff, David and Baber, Christopher (2003): Evaluation of Augmented Reality Systems. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Information Visualization IV03 2003, London. pp. 505-511. Available online

Augmented reality (AR) systems need to be evaluated for their appropriateness for a given task. Three approaches are used to evaluate the waterpump augmented reality tool (WART). The system is assessed using verbal protocol, performance time and a questionnaire. The WART system is compared with a paper version of the assembly instructions. The verbal protocol revealed that there was more cognitive processing for the paper version of task than WART, it took longer to complete the task with WART than the paper version and the questionnaire revealed the effect on performance of problems associated with AR. All of the participants in the evaluation, however, were positive about WART, and appreciated its usefulness.

© All rights reserved Haniff and Baber and/or IEEE Computer Society

2001
 
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Haniff, David and Baber, Christopher (2001): Categorizing Augmented Reality Systems. In Journal of Three Dimensional Images, 14 (4) pp. 105-110. Available online

Augmented Reality (AR) superimposes virtual information onto the real world. AR system development is reaching the maturity of Virtual Reality (VR) systems. However, AR systems vary considerably due to the variety of applications that use different input and output methods. There is therefore a need to categorize these systems in order to ascertain the options available in the use of AR for particular activities. This paper describes a study categorizing five AR systems and proposes that AR systems can also be looked at in terms of context and granularity. Three AR systems developed at the University of Birmingham are presented to illustrate these categories

© All rights reserved Haniff and Baber and/or their publisher

 
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Baber, Christopher, Sharples, Mike, Boardman, Michael, Price, Amber and Haniff, David (2001): Requirements engineering of personal technology for police officers,. In: Hirose, M. (ed.) Proceedings of Interact 2001 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 512-520.

 
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Baber, Christopher, Haniff, David, Sharples, Mike, Boardman, Michael and Price, Amber (2001): A Requirements Analysis of Personal Mobile Computers for Police Officers (In Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics,. In: Harris, D (ed.) Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics 2001. pp. 21-28.

 
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Haniff, David (2001): Augmenting Reality,. In: Bulletin of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science 2001, Glagow. p. 255.

1999
 
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Haniff, David and Baber, Christopher (1999): Wearable Computer for the Fire Service & Police Force: Technological and Human Factors. In: Proceedings of International Symposium of Wearable Computers 1999, San Fransisco. pp. 185-186. Available online

Wearable computer applications can be defined broadly as situationally-aware and situationally-unaware. A situationally-aware fire-fighter application which is under development is described and a situationally-unaware police force application is presented. However, underlying these developments is the issue of the appropriateness of the user interface for these applications.The paper also looks at the use of electronic devices within the firefighters helmets to indicate help such as where is your buddy (support in a firefighter situation) and when to get out. It also describes the use of speech recognition to access licence plate numbers on the Police National Computer.

© All rights reserved Haniff and Baber and/or IEEE Computer Society

 
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Baber, Christopher, Haniff, David and Buckley, Rob (1999): Wearable Information Appliances for the Emergency Services: HotHelmet. In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science 1707 1999. pp. 314-316. Available online

Much of the work into wearable computers has been concerned with the miniaturization of Personal Computers, e.g., 486 or Pentium-based. In this project, we ask whether it is possible to build a wearable device from much simpler electronic components. Specification for the device is based on the capture of user requirements, and constraints for the design are obtained from consideration of the operating environment.

© All rights reserved Baber et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Haniff, David, Boud, Andy and Baber, Christopher (1999): Assembly Training with Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality. In: Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT 99 Volume II 1999, Glasgow, Scotland. pp. 35-36.

 
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Boud, Andy, Haniff, David, Baber, Christopher and Steiner, Simon (1999): Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality as a Training Tool for Assembly Tasks. In: Proceedings of International Conference on Information Visualization IV 99 1999, London. pp. 32-36.

 
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Baber, Christopher, Arvanitis, Theo N, Haniff, David and Buckley, Rob (1999): A Wearable Computer for Paramedics: Studies in Model-based, User-centred and Industrial Design. In: Human-Computer Interaction INTERACT 99 1999, Glasgow, UK. pp. 126-132. Available online

In this paper, we report work into wearable computers for paramedics. The paper begins with an overview of the design using Unified Modeling Language (UML). This demonstrates the information flow and task activity in typical paramedic work. A demonstrator system was described using such UML models. The second part of the paper reports a user trial of a working prototype wearable computer, involving experienced paramedics, at a training school. The results of this study suggest that the wearable computer might slow collection of baseline data, although this finding does not apply to all tasks. On the basis of the trial findings and the positive comments received from the paramedics, it is proposed that a wearable computer may offer benefits over current work practice. The paramedics did complain about the design of current technology which led to an industrial design project to develop a new concept. The third section presents the new design concept for a wearable computer for paramedicst. This design relies on the distribution of the equipment around the body in order to increase the wearability of the design.

© All rights reserved Baber et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Haniff, David (1999): Augmented Reality and ComputerAssisted Learning. In Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning, 15 (2) pp. 175-176. Available online

1998
 
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Baber, Christopher, Haniff, David, Cooper, Lee, Knight, James and Mellor, Brian (1998): Preliminary Investigations into the Use of Wearable Computers. In: Johnson, Hilary, Nigay, Laurence and Roast, C. R. (eds.) Proceedings of the Thirteenth Conference of the British Computer Society Human Computer Interaction Specialist Group - People and Computers XIII August 1-4, 1998, Sheffield, UK. pp. 313-325.

In this paper, we investigate human factors which could have a bearing on the use of wearable computers. The first study examines performance on a reaction time task using a head-mounted display in comparison with performance on a sVGA visual display unit. While the number of missed targets was not significantly different, there were significant differences in reaction time to displays. The second study shows performance time of participants using a wearable computer to be superior to those using paper-based manual and recording, but there is a trend for more errors to be made when using the wearable computer.

© All rights reserved Baber et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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