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Daniel Oblinger

 

Publications by Daniel Oblinger (bibliography)

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2006
 
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Oblinger, Daniel, Castelli, Vittorio and Bergman, Lawrence (2006): Augmentation-based learning: combining observations and user edits for programming-by-demonstration. In: Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2006. pp. 202-209. Available online

In this paper we introduce a new approach to Programming-by-Demonstration in which the user is allowed to explicitly edit the procedure model produced by the learning algorithm while demonstrating the task. We describe a new algorithm, Augmentation-Based Learning, that supports this approach by considering both demonstrations and edits as constraints on the hypothesis space, and resolving conflicts in favor of edits.

© All rights reserved Oblinger et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Bergman, Lawrence, Castelli, Vittorio, Lau, Tessa and Oblinger, Daniel (2005): DocWizards: a system for authoring follow-me documentation wizards. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 191-200. Available online

Traditional documentation for computer-based procedures is difficult to use: readers have trouble navigating long complex instructions, have trouble mapping from the text to display widgets, and waste time performing repetitive procedures. We propose a new class of improved documentation that we call follow-me documentation wizards. Follow-me documentation wizards step a user through a script representation of a procedure by highlighting portions of the text, as well application UI elements. This paper presents algorithms for automatically capturing follow-me documentation wizards by demonstration, through observing experts performing the procedure. We also present our DocWizards implementation on the Eclipse platform. We evaluate our system with an initial user study that showing that most users have a marked preference for this form of guidance over traditional documentation.

© All rights reserved Bergman et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Lau, Tessa, Bergman, Lawrence, Castelli, Vittorio and Oblinger, Daniel (2004): Sheepdog: learning procedures for technical support. In: Nunes, Nuno Jardim and Rich, Charles (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2004 January 13-16, 2004, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal. pp. 109-116. Available online

Technical support procedures are typically very complex. Users often have trouble following printed instructions describing how to perform these procedures, and these instructions are difficult for support personnel to author clearly. Our goal is to learn these procedures by demonstration, watching multiple experts performing the same procedure across different operating conditions, and produce an executable procedure that runs interactively on the user's desktop. Most previous programming by demonstration systems have focused on simple programs with regular structure, such as loops with fixed-length bodies. In contrast, our system induces complex procedure structure by aligning multiple execution traces covering different paths through the procedure. This paper presents a solution to this alignment problem using Input/Output Hidden Markov Models. We describe the results of a user study that examines how users follow printed directions. We present Sheepdog, an implemented system for capturing, learning, and playing back technical support procedures on the Windows desktop. Finally, we empirically evalute our system using traces gathered from the user study and show that we are able to achieve 73% accuracy on a network configuration task using a procedure trained by non-experts.

© All rights reserved Lau et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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