Publication statistics

Pub. period:1986-2011
Pub. count:44
Number of co-authors:64



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas Dieberger:5
Peter Pirolli:4
Lynn Wilcox:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Daniel M. Russell's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jonathan Grudin:105
Stuart K. Card:75
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
 
 
 
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Daniel M. Russell

Has also published under the name of:
"D. M. Russell"

Personal Homepage:
https://sites.google.com/site/dmrussell/


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Publications by Daniel M. Russell (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Pirolli, Peter and Russell, Daniel M. (2011): Introduction to this Special Issue on Sensemaking. In Human Computer Interaction, 26 (1) pp. 1-8.

2009
 
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Oliveira, Flavio T. P., Aula, Anne and Russell, Daniel M. (2009): Discriminating the relevance of web search results with measures of pupil size. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2209-2212.

The overwhelming amount of information on the web makes it critical for users to quickly and accurately evaluate the relevance of content. Here we tested whether pupil size can be used to discriminate the perceived relevance of web search results. Our findings revealed that measures of pupil size carry information that can be used to discriminate the relevance of text and image web search results, but the low signal-to-noise ratio poses challenges that need to be overcome when using this technique in naturalistic settings. Despite these challenges, our findings highlight the promise that pupillometry has as a technique that can be used to assess interest and relevance in web interaction in a non-intrusive and objective way.

© All rights reserved Oliveira et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Pirolli, Peter, Furnas, George, Card, Stuart K. and Stefik, Mark (2009): Sensemaking workshop CHI 2009. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4751-4754.

How does one make sense of a large or complex task? By the term "sensemaking" we mean the processes people go through to frame, collect, organize and structure information to help understand a problem. Sensemaking is what people do to get from the earliest phases of an information collecting and organizing task to the conclusion. Sensemaking tasks are commonplace, and this workshop is dedicated to understanding the range of sensemaking behaviors and systems that can support sensemaking.

© All rights reserved Russell et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Oren, Mike (2009): Retrospective Cued Recall: A Method for Accurately Recalling Previous User Behaviors. In: HICSS 2009 - 42st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 5-8 January, 2009, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. pp. 1-9.

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Tang, Diane, Kellar, Melanie and Jeffries, Robin (2009): Task Behaviors During Web Search: The Difficulty of Assigning Labels. In: HICSS 2009 - 42st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 5-8 January, 2009, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. pp. 1-5.

2008
 
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Russell, Daniel M., Furnas, George W., Stefik, Mark, Card, Stuart K. and Pirolli, Peter (2008): Sensemaking. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3981-3984.

When confronted with a large or complex amount of information, how DO people come to understand it? This workshop will focus on the most recent work in sensemaking, the activities, technologies and behaviors that people do when making sense of their complex information spaces.

© All rights reserved Russell et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Grimes, Carrie (2007): Assigned tasks are not the same as self-chosen Web search tasks. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 83.

 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Grudin, Jonathan (2007): Minitrack Summary: Using Information: New Technologies, Ways & Means. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 84.

 
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Beymer, David, Orton, Peter Z. and Russell, Daniel M. (2007): An Eye Tracking Study of How Pictures Influence Online Reading. In: Baranauskas, Maria Cecília Calani, Palanque, Philippe A., Abascal, Julio and Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira (eds.) DEGAS 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services September 11th, 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. pp. 456-460.

2006
 
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Russell, Daniel M., Slaney, Malcolm, Qu, Yan and Houston, Mave (2006): Being Literate with Large Document Collections: Observational Studies and Cost Structure Tradeoffs. In: HICSS 2006 - 39th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 4-7 January, 2006, Kauai, HI, USA. .

 
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Huang, Elaine M., Mynatt, Elizabeth D., Russell, Daniel M. and Sue, Alison E. (2006): Secrets to Success and Fatal Flaws: The Design of Large-Display Groupware. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (1) pp. 37-45.

2005
 
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Beymer, David and Russell, Daniel M. (2005): WebGazeAnalyzer: a system for capturing and analyzing web reading behavior using eye gaze. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1913-1916.

Capturing and analyzing the detailed eye movements of a user while reading a web page can reveal much about the ways in which web reading occurs. The WebGazeAnalyzer system described here is a remote-camera system, requiring no invasive head-mounted apparatus, giving test subjects a normal web use experience when performing web-based tasks. While many such systems have been used in the past to collect eye gaze data, WebGazeAnalyzer brings together several techniques for efficiently collecting, analyzing and re-analyzing eye gaze data. We briefly describe techniques for overcoming the inherent inaccuracies of such apparatus, illustrating how we capture and analyze eye gaze data for commercial web design problems. Techniques developed here include methods to group fixations along lines of text, and reading analysis to measure reading speed, regressions, and coverage of web page text.

© All rights reserved Beymer and Russell and/or ACM Press

 
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Furnas, George W. and Russell, Daniel M. (2005): Making sense of sensemaking. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2115-2116.

 
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Beymer, D., Russell, Daniel M. and Orton, P. Z. (2005): Wide vs. Narrow Paragraphs: An Eye Tracking Analysis. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 741-752.

How wide should paragraphs be formatted for optimal reader retention and ease of reading? While everyone is familiar with the narrow, multi-column formatting in newspapers and magazines, research on the issue is not consistent. Early work using printed media favored narrow formatting, while more recent work using computer monitors has favored wider formatting. In this paper, we approach this issue by using eye tracking analysis of users reading material on instructional web pages. In our experimental system, subjects read the material using an instrumented browser that records all HTML content and browser actions, and their eye gaze is recorded using a nonobtrusive, "remote" eye tracker. Comparing the wide and narrow formatting conditions, our analysis shows that for narrow formatting, subjects (a) read slightly faster, (b) have fewer regressions, (c) retain more information in a post-test of the material, but (d) tend to abandon the ends of longer paragraphs.

© All rights reserved Beymer et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Dieberger, A., Bhagwan, V. and Gruhl, D. (2005): Large Visualizations for System Monitoring of Complex, Heterogeneous Systems. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 938-941.

As systems grow larger in size and complexity, it becomes increasingly difficult for administrators to maintain some shared sense of awareness of what's going on in the system. We implemented a large public display with appropriately designed visualizations that allow for rapid assessment and peripheral awareness of system health. By placing the visualizations on a large display in a shared, commonly used team location, system administrators can monitor behavior as they walk past. Such a display helps administrators identify emerging problems early on and be a focal point for discussions of the system. It allows them not only to share information with colleagues on an "as-noticed" basis, but also highlights interconnected problems that would not be otherwise evident. We found that this approach significantly reduces the workload of individual system administrators, changing the nature of their work by radically simplifying a complex task through social sharing of peripherally noticed state.

© All rights reserved Russell et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Crowder, G., Foster, S., Russell, Daniel M., Slaney, M. and Yanguas, L. (2005): Analytic Worksheets: A Framework to Support Human Analysis of Large Streaming Data Volumes. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 950-953.

Worksheets are a new user-interface framework to support analysis of streaming data by combining streaming data queries with visualization objects in a composable document framework. A worksheet lets users work at human speeds with large quantities of streaming data by creating a persistent, literate, dynamic document that flows data into analysis patterns of filters and visual presentations. The worksheet provides basic support for analysis created, as well as buffering and managing streaming data as it continually arrives.

© All rights reserved Crowder et al. and/or Springer Verlag

 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Dieberger, Andreas (2005): Minitrack Summary: Media Literacy-Reading and Writing Digital Forms. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. .

 
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Slaney, Malcolm and Russell, Daniel M. (2005): Measuring Information Understanding in Large Document Collections. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. .

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Streitz, Norbert A. and Winograd, Terry (2005): Building disappearing computers. In Communications of the ACM, 48 (3) pp. 42-48.

2004
 
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Huang, Elaine M., Russell, Daniel M. and Sue, Alison (2004): IM here: public instant messaging on large, shared displays for workgroup interactions. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 279-286.

Instant messaging (IM) in the workplace has proven to be a valuable tool for facilitating informal communication. Its benefits, however, are generally limited to times when users are in front of their computers. Because so much work takes place while people are mobile within their workplace, we sought to extend the benefits of IM beyond people's personal machines and into publicly accessible groupware. We first conducted a study of large display groupware applications (LDGAs) to understand the affordances that large displays offer for groupware, and the factors surrounding their adoption. We developed the IM Here system for shared IM on large displays using the lessons learned from the study. In this paper, we present the findings of our LDGA study, the design of IM Here and the preliminary results of our evaluation of IM as a public resource for workgroups.

© All rights reserved Huang et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Dieberger, Andreas (2004): The Experience of Media - From Design to Use: Minitrack Introduction. In: HICSS 2004 2004. .

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Trimble, Jay P. and Dieberger, Andreas (2004): The Use Patterns of Large, Interactive Display Surfaces: Case Studies of Media Design and Use for BlueBoard and MERBoard. In: HICSS 2004 2004. .

2003
 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Dieberger, Andreas (2003): Synthesizing Evocative Imagery through Design Patterns. In: HICSS 2003 2003. p. 101.

 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Wilcox, Lynn (2003): Minitrack Summary: Creating the Experience of Media - From Media Design to Media. In: HICSS 2003 2003. p. 99.

2002
 
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Russell, Daniel M., Drews, Clemens and Sue, Alison E. (2002): Social Aspects of Using Large Public Interactive Displays for Collaboration. In: Borriello, Gaetano and Holmquist, Lars Erik (eds.) UbiComp 2002 Ubiquitous Computing - 4th International Conference September 29 - October 1, 2002, Göteborg, Sweden. pp. 229-236.

 
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Dieberger, Andreas and Russell, Daniel M. (2002): Exploratory Navigation in Large Multimedia Documents Using Context Lenses. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 112.

 
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Wilcox, Lynn and Russell, Daniel M. (2002): Minitrack Introduction. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 110.

2001
 
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Dieberger, A. and Russell, Daniel M. (2001): Context Lenses - Document Visualization and Navigation Tools for Rapid Access to Detail. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 545-552.

 
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Russell, Daniel M. and Gossweiler, Rich (2001): On the Design of Personal & Communal Large Information Scale Appliances. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 354-361.

 
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Wilcox, Lynn and Russell, Daniel M. (2001): Digital Documents in the Office and Education - Minitrack Introduction. In: HICSS 2001 2001. .

2000
 
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Russell, Daniel M. (2000): Design brief: Xerox PARC. In Interactions, 7 (2) pp. 82-86.

 
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Russell, Daniel M. (2000): A Design Pattern-based Video Summarization Technique: Moving from Low-Level Signals to High-Level Structure. In: HICSS 2000 2000. .

1998
 
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Russell, Daniel M. (1998): The ATG Knowledge Management Technologies Laboratory. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (2) pp. 48-50.

The Knowledge Management Technologies was a collection of groups working toward a common goal: create the next generation of tools to give Mac users the ability to access and manipulate ever larger and more sophisticated kinds of information. The lab had five areas, each with a distinct mission. In its structure, the lab took on a variety of ways to approach the issues of knowledge management.

© All rights reserved Russell and/or ACM Press

 
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Russell, Daniel M. (1998): User Experience Research Group. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (2) pp. 90-94.

The idea of user experience is to take care of, account for, design and consider everything the user uses. Creating a useful and enriching user experience is an encompassing goal that necessarily crosses specialty boundaries in the pursuit of a single, unified, coherent experience of the computational. The User Experience Research group was formed within Apple's research labs as a multidisciplinary group to study and design new kinds of complete user experiences.

© All rights reserved Russell and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Glushko, Robert J., Dougherty, Dale, Kimber, Eliot, Rizk, Antoine, Russell, Daniel M. and Summers, Kent (1994): HTML -- Poison or Panacea?. In: Proceedings of ECHT 94 the ACM European Conference on Hypermedia Technology Sept 18-23, 1994, Edinburgh, UK. pp. 245-246.

Many people are having their first experience with a distributed hypertext system by using Mosaic or some other viewer based on HTML, the HyperText Markup Language of the World Wide Web. HTML's simplicity allows it to be created without special authoring tools or expertise, and the ubiquity of free WWW viewers like Mosaic removes one of the cost barriers. Because HTML is an application of SGML, the Standard Generalized Markup Language, it has also introduced many people to the concepts and syntax of application-independent markup. The explosive growth of the WWW makes it undeniable that HTML and Mosaic will serve as the reference point for much future thinking about hypertext and SGML outside of the academic and research community. But if HTML is to some people a democratizing force for hypertext authoring and publishing, to others its lack of structure and validation is a substantial step backwards for authors, readers, and their organizations. HTML has proven the basic premise of SGML, that a standard, application-independent data representation can enable blind interchange among disparate and even unknown or unpredicted applications. But to many SGML advocates, HTML is too primitive, and today's HTML documents will end up as tomorrow's cast-off legacy data format. HTML viewers may seem appealing for network publishing, but to some they are merely seductive and superficial, undermining years of careful research on usability and business models. The goal of this panel is to de-balkanize the bi-polar HTML camps and seek a productive role for all points of view. HTML and the WWW are simply too important for the academic and research community to ignore. HTML will not go away. We must participate in the evolution of HTML and find ways to become part of the network publishing revolution it represents.

© All rights reserved Glushko et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Paolini, Paolo, Glushko, Robert J., Dougherty, Dale, Kimber, Eliot, Rizk, Antoine and Russell, Daniel M. (1994): Does Multimedia Make a Difference?. In: Proceedings of ECHT 94 the ACM European Conference on Hypermedia Technology Sept 18-23, 1994, Edinburgh, UK. p. 247.

Hypertext applications and tools in general deal with "passive" media. Values of passive media are static, in the sense that as time progresses their presentation (state) does not change. Values of active media have the property of changing presentation (evolution of the state), as time progresses. Active media such as video, animation and sound are becoming a "necessity" in most recent Hypertext applications. The panel discusses the impact of the introduction of active media in the area of hypertext. The impact of active media upon hypertext can involve several aspects: presentation of the content, design of the applications, structuring techniques of the applications, interplay between synchronization and links, run-time support, communication performances and techniques for LAN or WAN architectures. Panellists argue that: * Hypertext should remain well separated from Multimedia, being a separated field, with a different set of notions and needs; * A limited number of changes will be enough in order to adapt most of the Hypertext notions and techniques to multimedia; * A revolution is needed.

© All rights reserved Paolini et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Davis, Marc, Baudin, Catherine, Kedar, Smadar and Russell, Daniel M. (1994): No Multimedia Without Representation (Panel). In: ACM Multimedia 1994 1994. pp. 181-182.

1993
 
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Russell, Daniel M., Stefik, Mark, Pirolli, Peter and Card, Stuart K. (1993): The Cost Structure of Sensemaking. In: Ashlund, Stacey, Mullet, Kevin, Henderson, Austin, Hollnagel, Erik and White, Ted (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 93 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-29, 1993, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 269-276.

Making sense of a body of data is a common activity in any kind of analysis. Sensemaking is the process of searching for a representation and encoding data in that representation to answer task-specific questions. Different operations during sensemaking require different cognitive and external resources. Representations are chosen and changed to reduce the cost of operations in an information processing task. The power of these representational shifts is generally under-appreciated as is the relation between sensemaking and information retrieval. We analyze sensemaking tasks and develop a model of the cost structure of sensemaking. We discuss implications for the integrated design of user interfaces, representational tools, and information retrieval systems.

© All rights reserved Russell et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Rao, Ramana, Russell, Daniel M. and Mackinlay, Jock D. (1993): System Components for Embedded Information Retrieval from Multiple Disparate Information Sources. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. pp. 23-33.

Current information retrieval interfaces only address a small part of the reality of rich interactions amongst user, task, and information sources. We view information gathering as an interactive, iterative activity involving multiple disparate information sources and embedded in the context of broader processes of information use. We have developed two key system components that enable information workspaces that adhere to this reformulation of information retrieval. The first is a design for a user/system interaction model for retrieval from multiple, disparate information sources. The second is a repository modeling system, called Repo, that represents meta-information about different information repositories in a manner that supports system operation as well as provides a direct information resource to the user. To test these ideas, we have utilized Repo and embodied the interaction model in the user interface of a system called Labrador.

© All rights reserved Rao et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Russell, Daniel M., Landow, George P., Streitz, Norbert A., Moulthrop, Stuart and Bolter, Jay David (1993): Designing and Building Structure. In: Stotts, P. David and Furuta, Richard (eds.) Proceedings of ACM Hypertext 93 Conference November 14-18, 1993, Seattle, Washington. .

Does a priori structure lead to well designed hypertexts? Or merely dull hypertexts? Moderator Daniel Russell begins with a comparative technical briefing, exploring structure-building in Storyspace, IDE, and MacWeb. A free-wheeling panel discussion follows, exploring shifting opinion on this vital issue.

© All rights reserved Russell et al. and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Gloor, Peter A., Kibby, Michael, McAleese, Ray, Mulhauser, Max, Nelson, Gerald C. and Russell, Daniel M. (1990): How Should Hypermedia Authoring Systems for Computer Aided Instruction Look Like?. In: Rizk, Antoine, Streitz, Norbert A. and Andre, Jacques (eds.) ECHT 90 - European Conference on Hypertext November 27-30, 1990, Versailles, France. pp. 337-342.

1989
 
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Jordan, Daniel S., Russell, Daniel M., Jensen, Anne-Marie S. and Rogers, Russell A. (1989): Facilitating the Development of Representations in Hypertext with IDE. In: Halasz, Frank and Meyrowitz, Norman (eds.) Proceedings of ACM Hypertext 89 Conference November 5-8, 1989, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 93-104.

Hypertext systems are used for a variety of representational tasks, many that involve fairly formalized structures. Because hypertext systems are generally intended for developing informal (unstructured data) and semi-formal (semantic networks) structures, developing more formal structures can be difficult. Regular patterns in structures must often be recreated from primitive elements (individual nodes and links) resulting in a high overhead cost. In this paper we describe the Instructional Design Environment, or IDE, a hypertext system application that facilitates the rapid and accurate creation of regular network patterns in hypertext. IDE focuses on the task of instructional design, but its facilities are general and useful to many representation tasks. IDE features structure accelerators that provide simple menu interfaces to (1) define network structures out of patterns of typed node and link connections, (2) create new node types that contain structured content, and (3) tailor the interface for creating cards, links and structures to focus attention during different stages of the representation task. These mechanisms allow the user to tailor the hypertext environment to better meet his or her representational needs. We also report on the field use of IDE by instructional designers.

© All rights reserved Jordan et al. and/or ACM Press

1987
 
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Shrager, Jeff, Jordan, Daniel S., Moran, Thomas P., Kiczales, Gregor and Russell, Daniel M. (1987): Issues in the Pragmatics of Qualitative Modeling: Lessons Learned from a Xerographics Project. In Communications of the ACM, 30 (12) pp. 1036-1047.

1986
 
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Quinn, Lisa and Russell, Daniel M. (1986): Intelligent Interfaces: User Models and Planners. In: Mantei, Marilyn and Orbeton, Peter (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 86 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 13-17, 1986, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 314-320.

To meet the challenge of constructing interfaces for increasingly complex multifunctional products, designers will be attracted by the promise offered by "intelligent" systems. However, the value of such sophisticated systems must be measured in terms of the quality of their user's models. One such intelligent interface -- an Expert Help System -- has been designed, implemented, and evaluated. We argue that the operability problems noted in the users' interactions with this system are attributable to lack of a strong user model in the system interface. Such a model plays a critical role in determining the effectiveness of the system's ability to monitor the user's planning activities. We discuss the requirements of a strong user model and provide an example of how such a model might be integrated into a planner-based intelligent interface.

© All rights reserved Quinn and Russell and/or ACM Press

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/daniel_m__russell.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1986-2011
Pub. count:44
Number of co-authors:64



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Andreas Dieberger:5
Peter Pirolli:4
Lynn Wilcox:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Daniel M. Russell's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jonathan Grudin:105
Stuart K. Card:75
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
 
 
 
Jul 10

Visual appearance is one of the most effective variables for quickly differentiating one application from another

-- Bob Baxley, 2003

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!