Publication statistics

Pub. period:1982-2012
Pub. count:40
Number of co-authors:42



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Natalia Marmasse:5
Mark S. Ackerman:4
Debby Hindus:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Chris Schmandt's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mark S. Ackerman:67
George G. Robertso..:61
Roy Want:41
 
 
 

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Chris Schmandt

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Publications by Chris Schmandt (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Harry, Drew, Gordon, Eric and Schmandt, Chris (2012): Setting the stage for interaction: a tablet application to augment group discussion in a seminar class. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 1071-1080.

We present a tablet-based system to collaboratively track discussion topics and ideas in a seminar-style discussion classroom. Each student uses his or her own tablet to share text ideas in a synchronized, visual environment. The system is designed to promote diverse participation and increase engagement. Our findings are based on observations of twelve class sessions and interviews with participating students. Instead of simply introducing an additional text-based communication channel into the classroom, we find that the system creates a new "stage" (in the Goffman sense) on which students could perform in ways that the main spoken stage could not support. This stage coexists with spoken communication, and augments how students attend to the material and each other. We conclude that spoken participation alone poses barriers for some participants and the addition of a non-oral, text-based stage can help establish equitable and engaging discussions in the class.

© All rights reserved Harry et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Kim, Sunjun, Chung, Jaewoo, Oh, Alice, Schmandt, Chris and Kim, Ig-Jae (2010): iLight: information flashlight on objects using handheld projector. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3631-3636.

Handheld Projectors are novel display devices developed recently. In this paper we present iLight, Information flashLight, which is based on the ongoing research project Guiding Light [9] using a handheld projector. By using a handheld projector with a tiny camera attached on it, system can recognize objects and augment information directly on them. iLight also present a interaction methodology on handheld projector and a novel real-time interactive experiences among users.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Chung, Jaewoo and Schmandt, Chris (2009): Going my way: a user-aware route planner. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1899-1902.

Going My Way is a mobile user-aware route planner. The system collects GPS data of a user's everyday locations and provides directions from an automatically selected set of landmarks that are close to the destination, informed by the user's usual travel patterns. In this paper, we present a brief description of the system, the results of a preliminary experiment in memory and recognition of landmarks, in addition to the results of a user evaluation of the system.

© All rights reserved Chung and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Modlitba, Paulina L. and Schmandt, Chris (2008): Globetoddler: designing for remote interaction between preschoolers and their traveling parents. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3057-3062.

In recent decades, families in the Western world have become more geographically distributed, making it more difficult for family members to achieve and maintain a feeling of connectedness. Different time zones and contexts and a limited awareness of the other family members' availability and mood are some of many factors that make "being together" more challenging when physically apart. Besides, when it comes to preschool children, existing communication technologies, such as phones and computers, may not even be an option. As a result, many families simply accept the fact that being apart leads to fragmented, or even non-existent, interaction. In this paper we describe initial work on a tangible system, Globetoddler, which aims to make remote interaction between preschool children and their traveling parents easy and enjoyable. The paper describes the process of defining design principles for this system, as well as the content and implications of these principles.

© All rights reserved Modlitba and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Marti, Stefan and Schmandt, Chris (2005): Physical embodiments for mobile communication agents. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 231-240.

This paper describes a physically embodied and animated user interface to an interactive call handling agent, consisting of a small wireless animatronic device in the form of a squirrel, bunny, or parrot. A software tool creates movement primitives, composes these primitives into complex behaviors, and triggers these behaviors dynamically at state changes in the conversational agent\'s finite state machine. Gaze and gestural cues from the animatronics alert both the user and co-located third parties of incoming phone calls, and data suggests that such alerting is less intrusive than conventional telephones.

© All rights reserved Marti and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Marti, Stefan and Schmandt, Chris (2005): Giving the caller the finger: collaborative responsibility for cellphone interruptions. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1633-1636.

We present a system in which a cell phone decides whether to ring by accepting votes from the others in a conversation with the called party. When a call comes in, the phone first determines who is in the conversation by using a decentralized network of autonomous body-worn sensor nodes. It then vibrates all participants' wireless finger rings. Although the alerted people do not know if it is their own cellphones that are about to interrupt, each of them has the possibility to veto the call anonymously by touching his/her finger ring. If no one vetoes, the phone rings. A user study showed significantly more vetoes during a collaborative group-focused setting than during a less group oriented setting. Our system is a component of a larger research project in context-aware computer-mediated call control.

© All rights reserved Marti and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Schmandt, Chris and Marti, Stefan (2005): Active Messenger: E-Mail Filtering and Delivery in a Heterogeneous Network. In Human-Computer Interaction, 20 (1) pp. 163-194.

Active Messenger (AM) is a software agent that dynamically filters and routes e-mail to a variety of wired and wireless delivery channels, monitoring a message's progress through various channels over time. Its goal is to ensure that desired messages always reach the subscriber, while decreasing message volume when the user is less reachable through location awareness. AM acts as a proxy, hiding the identity of the multiple device addresses at which the subscriber may be found and caches channels to guarantee seamless information delivery in a heterogeneous network. Our previous experience with mobile messaging influenced the initial requirements and design of AM. We describe the operation and evolution of AM to meet changing user needs, and how our own communication patterns and expectations have changed as we relied increasingly on mobile delivery.

© All rights reserved Schmandt and Marti and/or Taylor and Francis

2004
 
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Vemuri, Sunil, DeCamp, Philip, Bender, Walter and Schmandt, Chris (2004): Improving speech playback using time-compression and speech recognition. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 295-302.

Despite the ready availability of digital recording technology and the continually decreasing cost of digital storage, browsing audio recordings remains a tedious task. This paper presents evidence in support of a system designed to assist with information comprehension and retrieval tasks from a large collection of recorded speech. Two techniques are employed to assist users with these tasks. First, a speech recognizer creates necessarily error-laden transcripts of the recorded speech. Second, audio playback is time-compressed using the SOLAFS technique. When used together, subjects are able to perform comprehension tasks with more speed and accuracy.

© All rights reserved Vemuri et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Marmasse, Natalia, Schmandt, Chris and Spectre, David (2004): WatchMe: Communication and Awareness Between Members of a Closely-Knit Group. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 214-231.

 
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Vemuri, Sunil, Schmandt, Chris, Bender, Walter, Tellex, Stefanie and Lassey, Brad (2004): An Audio-Based Personal Memory Aid. In: Davies, Nigel, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Siio, Itiro (eds.) UbiComp 2004 Ubiquitous Computing 6th International Conference September 7-10, 2004, Nottingham, UK. pp. 400-417.

 
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Schmandt, Chris and Ackerman, Mark S. (2004): Personal and Ubiquitous Computing. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (6) pp. 389-390.

 
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Schmandt, Chris and Marmasse, Natalia (2004): User-Centered Location Awareness. In IEEE Computer, 37 (10) pp. 110-111.

2003
 
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Lakshmipathy, Vidya, Schmandt, Chris and Marmasse, Natalia (2003): TalkBack: a conversational answering machine. In: Proceedings of the 16th annural ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology November, 2-5, 2003, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 41-50.

Current asynchronous voice messaging interfaces, like voicemail, fail to take advantage of our conversational skills. TalkBack restores conversational turn-taking to voicemail retrieval by dividing voice messages into smaller sections based on the most significant silent and filled pauses and pausing after each to record a response. The responses are composed into a reply, alternating with snippets of the original message for context. TalkBack is built into a digital picture frame; the recipient touches a picture of the caller to hear each segment of the message in turn. The minimal interface models synchronous interaction and facilitates asynchronous voice messaging. TalkBack can also present a voice-annotated slide show which it receives over the Internet.

© All rights reserved Lakshmipathy et al. and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Schmandt, Chris, Kim, Jang, Lee, Kwan, Vallejo, Gerardo and Ackerman, Mark S. (2002): Mediated voice communication via mobile IP. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 141-150.

Impromptu is a mobile audio device which uses wireless Internet Protocol (IP) to access novel computer-mediated voice communication channels. These channels show the richness of IP-based communication as compared to conventional mobile telephony, adding audio processing and storage in the network, and flexible, user-centered call control protocols. These channels may be synchronous, asynchronous, or event-triggered, or even change modes as a function of other user activity. The demands of these modes plus the need to navigate with an entirely non-visual user interface are met with a number of audio-oriented user interaction techniques.

© All rights reserved Schmandt et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Marmasse, Natalia and Schmandt, Chris (2002): A User-Centered Location Model. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 6 (5) pp. 318-321.

2001
 
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Stifelman, Lisa, Arons, Barry and Schmandt, Chris (2001): The Audio Notebook: Paper and Pen Interaction with Structured Speech. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 182-189.

This paper addresses the problem that a listener experiences when attempting to capture information presented during a lecture, meeting, or interview. Listeners must divide their attention between the talker and their notetaking activity. We propose a new device-the Audio Notebook-for taking notes and interacting with a speech recording. The Audio Notebook is a combination of a digital audio recorder and paper notebook, all in one device. Audio recordings are structured using two techniques: user structuring based on notetaking activity, and acoustic structuring based on a talker's changes in pitch, pausing, and energy. A field study showed that the interaction techniques enabled a range of usage styles, from detailed review to high speed skimming. The study motivated the addition of phrase detection and topic suggestions to improve access to the audio recordings. Through these audio interaction techniques, the Audio Notebook defines a new approach for navigation in the audio domain.

© All rights reserved Stifelman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wheeler, Sean and Schmandt, Chris (2001): Aware Community Portals: Shared Information Appliances for Transitional Spaces. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (1) pp. 66-70.

2000
 
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Sawhney, Nitin and Schmandt, Chris (2000): Nomadic Radio: Speech and Audio Interaction for Contextual Messaging in Nomadic Environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 7 (3) pp. 353-383.

Mobile workers need seamless access to communication and information services while on the move. However, current solutions overwhelm users with intrusive interfaces and ambiguous notifications. This article discusses the interaction techniques developed for Nomadic Radio, a wearable computing platform for managing voice and text-based messages in a nomadic environment. Nomadic Radio employs an auditory user interface, which synchronizes speech recognition, speech synthesis, nonspeech audio, and spatial presentation of digital audio, for navigating among messages as well as asynchronous notification of newly arrived messages. Emphasis is placed on an auditory modality as Nomadic Radio is designed to be used while performing other tasks in a user's everyday environment; a range of auditory cues provides peripheral awareness of incoming messages. Notification is adaptive and context sensitive; messages are presented as more or less obtrusive based on importance inferred from content filtering, whether the user is engaged in conversation and his or her own recent responses to prior messages. Auditory notifications are dynamically scaled from ambient sound through recorded voice cues up to message summaries. Iterative design and a preliminary user evaluation suggest that audio is an appropriate medium for mobile messaging, but that care must be taken to minimally intrude on the wearer's social and physical environment.

© All rights reserved Sawhney and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Marmasse, Natalia and Schmandt, Chris (2000): Location-Aware Information Delivery with ComMotion. In: Thomas, Peter J. and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (eds.) Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing - Second International Symposium - HUC 2000 September 25-27, 2000, Bristol, UK. pp. 157-171.

1999
 
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Sawhney, Nitin and Schmandt, Chris (1999): Nomadic Radio: Scaleable and Contextual Notification for Wearable Audio Messaging. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 96-103.

Mobile workers need seamless access to communication and information services on portable devices. However current solutions overwhelm users with intrusive and ambiguous notifications. In this paper, we describe scaleable auditory techniques and a contextual notification model for providing timely information, while minimizing interruptions. User's actions influence local adaptation in the model. These techniques are demonstrated in Nomadic Radio, an audio-only wearable computing platform.

© All rights reserved Sawhney and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Schmandt, Chris (1999): Everywhere Messaging. In: Gellersen, Hans-Werner (ed.) Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing - First International Symposium - HUC99 September 27-29, 1999, Karlsruhe, Germany. pp. 22-27.

1998
 
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Schmandt, Chris (1998): Audio Hallway: A Virtual Acoustic Environment for Browsing. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 163-170.

This paper describes the Audio Hallway, a virtual acoustic environment for browsing collections of related audio files. The user travels up and down the Hallway by head motion, passing "rooms" alternately on the left and right sides. Emanating from each room is an auditory collage of "braided audio" which acoustically indicates the contents of the room. Each room represents a broadcast radio news story, and the contents are a collection of individual "sound bites" or actualities related to that story. Upon entering a room, the individual sounds comprising that story are arrayed spatially in front of the listener, with auditory focus controlled by head rotation. The main design challenge for the Audio Hallway is adequately controlling the auditory interface to position sounds so that spatial memory can facilitate navigation and recall in the absence of visual cues.

© All rights reserved Schmandt and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada.

 
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Kobayashi, Minuro and Schmandt, Chris (1997): Dynamic Soundscape: Mapping Time to Space for Audio Browsing. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 194-201.

Browsing audio data is not as easy as browsing printed documents because of the temporal nature of sound. This paper presents a browsing environment that provides a spatial interface for temporal navigation of audio data, taking advantage of human abilities of simultaneous listening and memory of spatial location. Instead of fast-forwarding or rewinding, users browse the audio data by switching their attention between moving sound sources that play multiple portions of a single audio recording. The motion of the sound sources maps temporal position within the audio recording onto spatial location, so that listeners can use their memory of spatial location to find a specific topic. This paper describes the iterative design approach toward the audio browsing system, including the development of user interface devices.

© All rights reserved Kobayashi and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Schmandt, Chris and Yankelovich, Nicole (1997): Introduction to the Special Issue on Speech as Data. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 4 (1) p. 1.

1996
 
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Marx, Matthew and Schmandt, Chris (1996): MailCall: Message Presentation and Navigation in a Nonvisual Environment. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 165-172.

MailCall is a telephone-based messaging system using speech recognition and synthesis. Its nonvisual interaction approaches the usability of visual systems through a combination of intelligent message categorization, efficient presentation, and random-access navigation. MailCall offers improved feedback, error-correction, and online help by considering the conversational context of the current session. Studies suggest that its nonvisual approach to handling messages is especially effective when the user has a large number of messages.

© All rights reserved Marx and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Roy, Deb K. and Schmandt, Chris (1996): NewsComm: A Hand-Held Interface for Interactive Access to Structured Audio. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 173-180.

The NewsComm system delivers personalized news and other program material as audio to mobile users through a hand-held playback device. This paper focuses on the iterative design and user testing of the hand-held interface. The interface was first designed and tested in a software-only environment and then ported to a custom hardware platform. The hand-held device enables navigation through audio recordings based on structural information which is extracted from the audio using digital signal processing techniques. The interface design addresses the problems of designing a hand-held and primarily non-visual interface for accessing large amounts of structured audio recordings.

© All rights reserved Roy and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Marx, Matthew and Schmandt, Chris (1996): CLUES: Dynamic Personalized Message Filtering. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 113-121.

Workgroups that defy traditional boundaries require successful communication among people whose interests, schedules, and locations may differ and are likely to change rapidly. CLUES is a dynamic personalized message filter that facilitates effective communication by prioritizing voice and text messages using personal information found in an individual's work environment. CLUES infers message timeliness by considering calendar appointments, outgoing messages and phone calls, and by correlating these "clues" via a personal rolodex. Experience shows that CLUES can be especially useful to mobile users with high message traffic who often access their messages over the telephone.

© All rights reserved Marx and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Marx, Matt and Schmandt, Chris (1994): Putting People First: Specifying Proper Names in Speech Interfaces. In: Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States. pp. 29-37.

Communication is about people, not machines. But as firms and families alike spread out geographically, we rely increasingly on telecommunications tools to keep us "connected." The challenge of such systems is to enable conversation between individuals without computational infrastructure getting in the way. This paper compares two speech-based communication systems, Phoneshell and Chatter, in how they deal with the keys to communication: proper names. Chatter, a conversational system using speech-recognition, improves upon the hierarchical nature of the touch-tone based Phoneshell by maintaining context and enabling use of amphora. Proper names can present particular problems for speech recognizes, so an interface algorithm for reliable name specification by spelling is offered. Since individual letter recognition is non-robust, Chatter implicitly disambiguates strings of letters based on context. We hypothesize that the right interface can make faulty speech recognition as usable as TouchTones -- even more so.

© All rights reserved Marx and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

1993
 
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Stifelman, Lisa, Arons, Barry, Schmandt, Chris and Hulteen, Eric A. (1993): VoiceNotes: A Speech Interface for a Hand-Held Voice Notetaker. In: Ashlund, Stacey, Mullet, Kevin, Henderson, Austin, Hollnagel, Erik and White, Ted (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 93 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-29, 1993, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 179-186.

VoiceNotes is an application for a voice-controlled hand-held computer that allows the creation, management, and retrieval of user-authored voice notes -- small segments of digitized speech containing thoughts, ideas, reminders, or things to do. Iterative design and user testing helped to refine the initial user interface design. VoiceNotes explores the problem of capturing and retrieving spontaneous ideas, the use of speech as data, and the use of speech input and output in the user interface for a hand-held computer without a visual display. In addition, VoiceNotes serves as a step toward new uses of voice technology and interfaces for future portable devices.

© All rights reserved Stifelman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hindus, Debby, Schmandt, Chris and Horner, Chris (1993): Capturing, Structuring, and Representing Ubiquitous Audio. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 11 (4) pp. 376-400.

Although talking is an integral part of collaboration, there has been little computer support for acquiring and accessing the contents of conversations. Our approach has focused on ubiquitous audio, or the unobtrusive capture of speech interactions in everyday work environments. Speech recognition technology cannot yet transcribe fluent conversational speech, so the words themselves are not available for organizing the captured interactions. Instead, the structure of an interaction is derived from acoustical information inherent in the stored speech and augmented by user interaction during or after capture. This article describes applications for capturing and structuring audio from office discussions and telephone calls, and mechanisms for later retrieval of these stored interactions. An important aspect of retrieval is choosing an appropriate visual representation, and this article describes the evolution of a family of representations across a range of applications. Finally, this work is placed within the broader context of desktop audio, mobile audio applications, and social implications.

© All rights reserved Hindus et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Schmandt, Chris (1993): Phoneshell: The Telephone as Computer Terminal. In: ACM Multimedia 1993 1993. pp. 373-382.

1992
 
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Hindus, Debby and Schmandt, Chris (1992): Ubiquitous Audio: Capturing Spontaneous Collaboration. In: Proceedings of the 1992 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work November 01 - 04, 1992, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 210-217.

Although talking is an integral part of collaborative activity, there has been little computer support for acquiring and accessing the contents of conversations. Our approach has focused on ubiquitous audio, or the unobtrusive capture of voice interactions in everyday work environments. Because the words themselves are not available for organizing the captured interactions, structure is derived from acoustical information inherent in the stored voice and augmented by user interaction during or after capture. This paper describes applications for capturing and structuring audio from office discussions and telephone calls, and mechanisms for later retrieval of these stored interactions.

© All rights reserved Hindus and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

1991
 
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Pier, Ken, Newman, William M., Redell, David, Schmandt, Chris, Theimer, Marvin M. and Want, Roy (1991): Locator Technology in Distributed Systems: The Active Badge. In: Jong, Peter de (ed.) Proceedings of the Conference on Organizational Computing Systems 1991 November 6-8, 1991, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 285-287.

Experiments with technology for locating and tracking people and things are occurring in computer science research centers in Europe and the United States. Although in its early stages, this location capability is viewed as an enabler for next-generation distributed computing systems in offices, universities, and perhaps the wider world. Such systems will no longer shackle users to their desktop PC or leave them stranded, unconnected, when using portable and notebook systems. Instead, ubiquitous wireless networks will track users and machines, delivering information and services as needed to people on the go [SciAm91]. The first of these locator technologies is called the Active Badge. Originated by Dr. Roy Want at the Olivetti Cambridge Research Lab, active badge networks are now installed at six sites [Sites]. These badges, worn in the workplace much like common corporate ID badges, use infrared technology to broadcast unique IDs to a simple network of sensors installed in laboratory spaces. The sensor network elements are polled by a central location service. Clients of that service can correlate sensor number with physical location and, for example, frequently update a location data base that is available to still other client programs. Locator technology raises a number of important questions, some of which are addressed by this panel. From the technology side, one might ask how these systems work, what other implementations are possible, and how should locator technology evolve and interact with other technologies in coming systems. Perhaps even more important are the sociological and ethical questions raised by locator capability. Will "Big Brother" monitor your every move? Must you wear an active badge to get your work done? Can you drop-in and drop-out of the location system as you wish? Can we architect systems that provide desirable services without actually revealing any individual's location and trail unless given permission by that individual? Some of these issues and some systems already in place will be discussed by our panelists.

© All rights reserved Pier et al. and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Schmandt, Chris, Hindus, Debby, Ackerman, Mark S. and Manandhar, Sanjay (1990): Observations on Using Speech Input for Window Navigation. In: Diaper, Dan, Gilmore, David J., Cockton, Gilbert and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 90 - 3rd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 27-31, 1990, Cambridge, UK. pp. 787-793.

We discuss the suitability of speech recognition for navigating within a window system and we describe Xspeak, an implementation of voice control for the X Window System. We made this interface available to a number of student programmers, and compared the use of speech and a pointer for window navigation through empirical and observational means. Our experience indicates that speech was attractive for some users, and we comment on their activities and recognition accuracy. These observations reveal pitfalls and advantages of using speech input in windows systems.

© All rights reserved Schmandt et al. and/or North-Holland

 
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Schmandt, Chris, Ackerman, Mark S. and Hindus, Debby (1990): Augmenting a Window System with Speech Input. In IEEE Computer, 23 (8) pp. 50-56.

1988
 
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Schmandt, Chris (1988): Employing Voice Back Channels to Facilitate Audio Document Retrieval. In: Allen, Robert (ed.) Proceedings of the Conference on Office Information Systems 1988 March 23-25, 1988, Palo Alto, California, USA. pp. 213-218.

Human listeners use voice back channels to indicate their comprehension of a talker's remarks. This paper describes an attempt to build a user interface capable of employing these back channel responses for flow control purposes while presenting a variety of audio information to a listener. Acoustic evidence based on duration and prosody (rhythm and melody) of listeners' utterances is employed as a means of discriminating responses by discourse function without using word recognition. Such an interface has been applied to three tasks: speech synthesis of driving directions, speech synthesis of electronic mail, and retrieval of recorded voice messages.

© All rights reserved Schmandt and/or ACM Press

1987
 
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Aucella, Arlene F., Kinkead, Robin, Schmandt, Chris and Wichansky, Anna (1987): Voice: Technology searching for communication needs. In: Graphics Interface 87 (CHI+GI 87) April 5-9, 1987, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 41-44.

 
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Schmandt, Chris (1987): Conversational Telecommunications Environments. In: Salvendy, Gavriel (ed.) HCI International 1987 - Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 10-14, 1987, Honolulu, Hawaii. pp. 439-446.

1982
 
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Schmandt, Chris and Hulteen, Eric A. (1982): The Intelligent Voice-Interactive Interface. In: Nichols, Jean A. and Schneider, Michael L. (eds.) Proceedings of the SIGCHI conference on Human factors in computing systems March 15-17, 1982, Gaithersburg, Maryland, United States. pp. 363-366.

"Put That There" is a voice and gesture interactive system implemented at the Architecture Machine Group at MIT. It allows a user to build and modify a graphical database on a large format video display. The goal of the research is a simple, conversational interface to sophisticated computer interaction. Natural language and gestures are used, while speech output allows the system to query the user on ambiguous input. This project starts from the assumption that speech recognition hardware will never be 100% accurate, and explores other techniques to increase the usefulness (i.e., the "effective accuracy") of such a system. These include: redundant input channels, syntactic and semantic analysis, and context-sensitive interpretation. In addition, we argue that recognition errors will be more tolerable if they are evident sooner through feedback and easily corrected by voice.

© All rights reserved Schmandt and and/or ACM Press

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/chris_schmandt.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1982-2012
Pub. count:40
Number of co-authors:42



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Natalia Marmasse:5
Mark S. Ackerman:4
Debby Hindus:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Chris Schmandt's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mark S. Ackerman:67
George G. Robertso..:61
Roy Want:41
 
 
 

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Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

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The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
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