Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2009
Pub. count:22
Number of co-authors:53



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Anuj Gujar:6
Kenneth P. Fishkin:5
Thomas P. Moran:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Beverly L. Harrison's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Scott E. Hudson:113
Hiroshi Ishii:111
James A. Landay:91
 
 
 

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Beverly L. Harrison

Has also published under the name of:
"Beverly Harrison"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.beverlyharrison.org/

 

Publications by Beverly L. Harrison (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Hudson, Scott E., Harrison, Chris, Harrison, Beverly L. and LaMarca, Anthony (2009): Whack gestures: inexact and inattentive interaction with mobile devices. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 109-112. Available online

We introduce Whack Gestures, an inexact and inattentive interaction technique. This approach seeks to provide a simple means to interact with devices with minimal attention from the user -- in particular, without the use of fine motor skills or detailed visual attention (requirements found in nearly all conventional interaction techniques). For mobile devices, this could enable interaction without "getting it out," grasping, or even glancing at the device. This class of techniques is suitable for a small number of simple but common interactions that could be carried out in an extremely lightweight fashion without disrupting other activities. With Whack Gestures, users can interact by striking a device with the open palm or heel of the hand. We briefly discuss the development and use of a preliminary version of this technique and show that implementations with high accuracy and a low false positive rate are feasible.

© All rights reserved Hudson et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Patel, Kayur, Fogarty, James, Landay, James A. and Harrison, Beverly L. (2008): Investigating statistical machine learning as a tool for software development. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 667-676. Available online

As statistical machine learning algorithms and techniques continue to mature, many researchers and developers see statistical machine learning not only as a topic of expert study, but also as a tool for software development. Extensive prior work has studied software development, but little prior work has studied software developers applying statistical machine learning. This paper presents interviews of eleven researchers experienced in applying statistical machine learning algorithms and techniques to human-computer interaction problems, as well as a study of ten participants working during a five-hour study to apply statistical machine learning algorithms and techniques to a realistic problem. We distill three related categories of difficulties that arise in applying statistical machine learning as a tool for software development: (1) difficulty pursuing statistical machine learning as an iterative and exploratory process, (2) difficulty understanding relationships between data and the behavior of statistical machine learning algorithms, and (3) difficulty evaluating the performance of statistical machine learning algorithms and techniques in the context of applications. This paper provides important new insight into these difficulties and the need for development tools that better support the application of statistical machine learning.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Consolvo, Sunny, McDonald, David W., Toscos, Tammy, Chen, Mike Y., Froehlich, Jon, Harrison, Beverly L., Klasnja, Predrag, LaMarca, Anthony, LeGrand, Louis, Libby, Ryan, Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2008): Activity sensing in the wild: a field trial of ubifit garden. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1797-1806. Available online

Recent advances in small inexpensive sensors, low-power processing, and activity modeling have enabled applications that use on-body sensing and machine learning to infer people's activities throughout everyday life. To address the growing rate of sedentary lifestyles, we have developed a system, UbiFit Garden, which uses these technologies and a personal, mobile display to encourage physical activity. We conducted a 3-week field trial in which 12 participants used the system and report findings focusing on their experiences with the sensing and activity inference. We discuss key implications for systems that use on-body sensing and activity inference to encourage physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Klasnja, Predrag V., Harrison, Beverly L., LeGrand, Louis, LaMarca, Anthony, Froehlich, Jon and Hudson, Scott E. (2008): Using wearable sensors and real time inference to understand human recall of routine activities. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 154-163. Available online

 
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Choudhury, Tanzeem, Borriello, Gaetano, Consolvo, Sunny, Hhnel, Dirk, Harrison, Beverly L., Hemingway, Bruce, Hightower, Jeffrey, Klasnja, Predrag V., Koscher, Karl, LaMarca, Anthony, Landay, James A., LeGrand, Louis, Lester, Jonathan, Rahimi, Ali, Rea, Adam and Wyatt, Danny (2008): The Mobile Sensing Platform: An Embedded Activity Recognition System. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (2) pp. 32-41. Available online

2007
 
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Consolvo, Sunny, Harrison, Beverly L., Smith, Ian, Chen, Mike Y., Everitt, Katherine, Froehlich, Jon and Landay, James A. (2007): Conducting In Situ Evaluations for and With Ubiquitous Computing Technologies. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 103-118. Available online

To evaluate ubiquitous computing technologies, which may be embedded in the environment, embedded in objects, worn, or carried by the user throughout everyday life, it is essential to use methods that accommodate the often unpredictable, real-world environments in which the technologies are used. This article discusses how we have adapted and applied traditional methods from psychology and human-computer interaction, such as Wizard of Oz and Experience Sampling, to be more amenable to the in situ evaluations of ubiquitous computing applications, particularly in the early stages of design. The way that ubiquitous computing technologies can facilitate the in situ collection of self-report data is also discussed. Although the focus is on ubiquitous computing applications and tools for their assessment, it is believed that the in situ evaluation tools that are proposed will be generally useful for field trials of other technology, applications, or formative studies that are concerned with collecting data in situ.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

2005
 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Cozzi, Alex and Moran, Thomas P. (2005): Roles and relationships for unified activity management. In: GROUP05: International Conference on Supporting Group Work November 6-9, 2005, Sanibel Island, Florida, USA. pp. 236-245. Available online

This paper reports on three ethnographic studies of how people coordinate their activities in various work settings. The findings reported here are a derived set of relationships reflecting the nature of involvement of people in their activities. These findings were then tested by six analysts, who were conducting field studies of patterns of complex business activities. They used the derived relationships in the analysis of their data and in the representation of activity patterns. These usage cases revealed confusion between involvement relationships and job roles. Finally, several implications of these studies for designing an activity management prototype are presented.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Muller, Michael J., Kuchinskaya, Olga, Minassian, Suzanne O., Tang, John C., Danis, Catalina, Zhao, Chen, Harrison, Beverly L. and Moran, Thomas P. (2005): Shared landmarks in complex coordination environments. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1681-1684. Available online

We explore the concept of social landmarks in complex, shared information and coordination environments. Previous research in navigation and shared spaces has tended to emphasize individual navigation, formally inscribed spaces, social filtering, and boundary objects. Based on ethnographic research into complex collaborative work in organizations, we extend the concept of navigational "landmarks" to include not only individually-used documents, but also shared landmarks in the form of persons, roles, and events. This emerging concept of social landmarks may be applied in identifying and representing these coordinating points, to support the work of teams and organizations in complex projects.

© All rights reserved Muller et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Fishkin, Kenneth P., Gujar, Anuj, Harrison, Beverly L., Moran, Thomas P. and Want, Roy (2000): Embodied user interfaces for really direct manipulation. In Communications of the ACM, 43 (9) pp. 74-80. Available online

1999
 
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Want, Roy, Fishkin, Kenneth P., Gujar, Anuj and Harrison, Beverly L. (1999): Bridging Physical and Virtual Worlds with Electronic Tags. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 370-377. Available online

The role of computers in the modern office has divided our activities between virtual interactions in the realm of the computer and physical interactions with real objects within the traditional office infrastructure. This paper extends previous work that has attempted to bridge this gap, to connect physical objects with virtual representations or computational functionality, via various types of tags. We discuss a variety of scenarios we have implemented using a novel combination of inexpensive, unobtrusive and easy to use RFID tags, tag readers, portable computers and wireless networking. This novel combination demonstrates the utility of invisibly, seamlessly and portably linking physical objects to networked electronic services and actions that are naturally associated with their form.

© All rights reserved Want et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Moore, Darnell J., Want, Roy, Harrison, Beverly L., Gujar, Anuj and Fishkin, Ken (1999): Implementing Phicons: Combining Computer Vision with Infrared Technology for Interactive Physical Icons. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 67-68. Available online

This paper describes a novel physical icon [3] ("phicon") based system that can be programmed to issue a range of commands about what the user wishes to do with handdrawn whiteboard content. Through the phicon's UI, a command to process whiteboard context is issued using infrared signaling in combination with image processing and a ceiling-mounted camera system. We leverage camera systems that are already used for capturing whiteboard content [4] by further augmenting these systems to detect the presence and location of IR beacons within an image. An HDLC-based protocol and a built-in IR transmitter are used to send these signals.

© All rights reserved Moore et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Moran, Thomas P., Saund, Eric, Melle, William van, Gujar, Anuj, Fishkin, Kenneth P. and Harrison, Beverly L. (1999): Design and Technology for Collaborage: Collaborative Collages of Information on Physical Walls. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 197-206. Available online

A Collaborage is a collaborative collage of physically represented information on a surface that is connected with electronic information, such as a physical In/Out board connected to a people-locator database. The physical surface (board) contains items that are tracked by camera and computer vision technology. Events on the board trigger electronic services. This paper motivates this concept, presents three different applications, describes the system architecture and component technologies, and discusses several design issues.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fishkin, Kenneth P., Moran, Thomas P. and Harrison, Beverly L. (1999): Embodied User Interfaces: Towards Invisible User Interfaces. In: Chatty, Stephane and Dewan, Prasun (eds.) Engineering for Human-Computer Interaction, IFIP TC2/TC13 WG2.7/WG13.4 Seventh Working Conference on Engineering for Human-Computer Interaction September 14-18, 1999, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. pp. 1-18.

1998
 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Fishkin, Kenneth P., Gujar, Anuj, Mochon, Carlos and Want, Roy (1998): Squeeze Me, Hold Me, Tilt Me! An Exploration of Manipulative User Interfaces. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Jolle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 17-24. Available online

This paper reports on the design and use of tactile user interfaces embedded within or wrapped around the devices that they control. We discuss three different interaction prototypes that we built. These interfaces were embedded onto two handheld devices of dramatically different form factors. We describe the design and implementation challenges, and user feedback and reactions to these prototypes. Implications for future design in the area of manipulative or haptic user interfaces are highlighted.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Adler, Annette, Gujar, Anuj, Harrison, Beverly L., O'Hara, Kenton P. and Sellen, Abigail (1998): A Diary Study of Work-Related Reading: Design Implications for Digital Reading Devices. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Jolle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 241-248. Available online

In this paper we describe a diary study of how people read in the course of their daily working lives. Fifteen people from a wide variety of professions were asked to log their daily document activity for a period of 5 consecutive working days. Using structured interviews, we analysed their reading activities in detail. We examine the range of reading activities that our subjects carried out, and then present findings relating to both common characteristics and variation across the sample. From these findings, we discuss some implications for the design of digital reading devices.

© All rights reserved Adler et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Harrison, Beverly L. and Vicente, Kim J. (1996): An Experimental Evaluation of Transparent Menu Usage. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 391-398. Available online

This paper reports a systematic evaluation of transparent user interfaces. It reflects our progression from theoretically-based experiments in focused attention to more representative application-based experiments on selection response times and error rates. We outline how our previous research relates to both the design and the results reported here. For this study, we used a variably-transparent, text menu superimposed over different backgrounds: text pages, wire-frame images, and solid images. We compared "standard" text (Motif style, Helvetica, 14 point) and a proposed font enhancement technique ("Anti-Interference" outlining). More generally, this experimental evaluation provides information about the interaction between transparency and text legibility.

© All rights reserved Harrison and Vicente and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Ishii, Hiroshi, Vicente, Kim J. and Buxton, Bill (1995): Transparent Layered User Interfaces: An Evaluation of a Display Design to Enhance Focused and Divided Attention. In: Katz, Irvin R., Mack, Robert L., Marks, Linn, Rosson, Mary Beth and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 95 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 7-11, 1995, Denver, Colorado. pp. 317-324. Available online

This paper describes a new research program investigating graphical user interfaces from an attentional perspective (as opposed to a more traditional visual perception approach). The central research issue is how we can better support both focusing attention on a single interface object (without distraction from other objects) and dividing or time sharing attention between multiple objects (to preserve context or global awareness). This attentional trade-off seems to be a central but as yet comparatively ignored issue in many interface designs. To this end, this paper proposes a framework for classifying and evaluating user interfaces with semi-transparent windows, menus, dialogue boxes, screens, or other objects. Semi-transparency fits into a more general proposed display design space of "layered" interface objects. We outline the design space, task space, and attentional issues which motivated our research. Our investigation is comprised of both empirical evaluation and more realistic application usage. This paper reports on the empirical results and summarizes some of the application findings.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Kurtenbach, Gordon and Vicente, Kim J. (1995): An Experimental Evaluation of Transparent User Interface Tools and Information Content. In: Robertson, George G. (ed.) Proceedings of the 8th annual ACM symposium on User interface and software technology November 15 - 17, 1995, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 81-90. Available online

The central research issue addressed by this paper is how we can design computer interfaces that better support human attention and better maintain the fluency of work. To accomplish this we propose to use semi-transparent user interface objects. This paper reports on an experimental evaluation which provides both valuable insights into design parameters and suggests a systematic evaluation methodology. For this study, we used a variably-transparent tool palette superimposed over different background content, combining text, wire-frame or line art images, and solid images. The experiment explores the issue of focused attention and interference, by varying both visual distinctiveness and levels of transparency.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Owen, Russell N. and Baecker, Ronald M. (1994): Timelines: An interactive system for the collection and visualization of temporal data. In: Graphics Interface 94 May 18-20, 1994, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 141-148.

1992
 
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Harrison, Beverly L. and Baecker, Ronald M. (1992): Designing video annotation and analysis systems. In: Graphics Interface 92 May 11-15, 1992, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 157-166.

 
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Harrison, Beverly L., Chignell, Mark and Baecker, Ronald M. (1992): Out of Site, Still in Mind? A Case Study in Video Mediated Communication. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 36th Annual Meeting 1992. pp. 242-246.

Video mediated communication alters our perception of the way in which we interact and communicate. In contrast to face to face or audio only (e.g., telephone) communication, there is relatively little systematic research on the effect of video conferencing on communication within groups of people at dispersed locations (Harrison, 1991b; Harrison et al, 1992b; Sellen, 1992; Wolf, 1988; Cohen, 1982; Short, Williams, and Christie, 1976). In this paper we describe a study of how participants at three distant locations perceived differences between face to face (within site) and video mediated (between site) communication. Results indicate that participants perceived between site, mediated communication to be unnatural and uncomfortable. They felt there were problems with gaining floor control and with conversation flow. Additionally, participants perceived the between site, mediated communication to be less interactive, less social, and less enjoyable than the face to face, within site communication. The insights gained through this and other case studies, summarized here, will be used to guide our future research. This study is one in a series of field trials and controlled experiments aimed at understanding the human factors issues associated with video communication and the design of such systems.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or Human Factors Society

1991
 
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Harrison, Beverly L. (1991): Video Annotation and Multimedia Interfaces: From Theory to Practice. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 35th Annual Meeting 1991. pp. 319-323.

Although video has been used for many years to record data, few tools have been developed to manipulate enhance video data. Current multimedia interfaces have severe cognitive and attentional limitations, reflecting technology-centred designs which have not profited from human factors theory and user-centred design. This results in cumbersome and expensive systems with serious usability problems. This paper describes a prototype Video ANNotation and Analysis system (VANNA), which integrates video, non-speech audio, voice, textual and graphical data, and which incorporates emerging technology, user-centred design and human factors theory.

© All rights reserved Harrison and/or Human Factors Society

 
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