Publication statistics

Pub. period:1998-2012
Pub. count:39
Number of co-authors:60



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Eunyee Koh:9
Ross Graeber:7
Andrew Webb:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Andruid Kerne's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Richard Furuta:60
Neil A. M. Maiden:45
Alberto Del Bimbo:36
 
 
 

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Andruid Kerne

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ecologylab.cs.tamu.edu/people/andruid.html


 

Publications by Andruid Kerne (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Kerne, Andruid, Hamilton, William A. and Toups, Zachary O. (2012): Culturally based design: embodying trans-surface interaction in rummy. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 509-518. Available online

We present culturally based design (CBD), a new paradigm for designing embodied natural user interaction (NUI) with digital information by drawing on customary ways that people use physical objects. CBD coalesces experiences, practices, and embodied mental models of pre-digital activities as a basis for the design of interactive systems. We apply CBD to address trans-surface interaction, the manipulation of information artifacts from one device to another. We develop Trans-Surface Rummy, because the game involves highly dynamic combinations of turn taking and non-linear out of turn play, while transferring information artifacts to and from private and social surfaces. Through the CBD process, we create the trans-surface wormhole, an embodied interface technique. We investigate the trans-surface wormhole's efficacy and other aspects of culturally based design with young students, and with elderly members of our local bridge club. We derive implications for the design of trans-surface interaction, and more broadly, from the process of CBD. We initiate a research agenda for trans-surface interaction.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hamilton, William, Kerne, Andruid and Robbins, Tom (2012): High-performance pen + touch modality interactions: a real-time strategy game eSports context. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 309-318. Available online

We used the situated context of real-time strategy (RTS) games to address the design and evaluation of new pen + touch interaction techniques. RTS play is a popular genre of Electronic Sports (eSports), games played and spectated at an extremely high level. Interaction techniques are critical for eSports players, because they so directly impact performance. Through this process, new techniques and implications for pen + touch and bi-manual interaction emerged. We enhance non-dominant hand (NDH) interaction with edge-constrained affordances, anchored to physical features of interactive surfaces, effectively increasing target width. We develop bi-manual overloading, an approach to reduce the total number of occurrences of NDH retargeting. The novel isosceles lasso select technique facilitates selection of complex object subsets. Pen-in-hand interaction, dominant hand touch interaction performed with the pen stowed in the palm, also emerged as an efficient and expressive interaction paradigm.

© All rights reserved Hamilton et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Toups, Zachary O., Kerne, Andruid, Hamilton, William A. and Shahzad, Nabeel (2011): Zero-fidelity simulation of fire emergency response: improving team coordination learning. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1959-1968. Available online

Fire emergency responders rely on team coordination to survive and succeed in high-stress environments, but traditional education does not directly teach these essential skills. Prior simulations seek the highest possible fidelity, employing resources to capture concrete characteristics of operating environments. We take a different tack, hypothesizing that a zero-fidelity approach, focusing on human-centered aspects of work practice, will improve team coordination learning. Such an approach promotes simulation focus by developing an alternative environment that stimulates participants to engage in distributed cognition. The costs of simulation development are reduced. To supplement preparation for burn training exercises, 28 fire emergency response students played the Teaching Team Coordination game (T2eC), a zero-fidelity simulation of the distributed cognition of fire emergency response work practice. To test our hypothesis, we develop quantitative evaluation methods for impact on team coordination learning through measures of communication efficiency and cooperative activity. Results show that participants improve cooperation, become more efficient communicators, differentiate team roles through communication, and leverage multiple communication modalities. Given the context of the study amidst the educational process, qualitative data from the students and their expert instructor supports the ecological validity of the contribution of the T2eC zero-fidelity simulation to fire emergency response education.

© All rights reserved Toups et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Moeller, Jon, Kerne, Andruid and Damaraju, Sashikanth (2011): ZeroTouch: a zero-thickness optical multi-touch force field. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1165-1170. Available online

We present zero-thickness optical multi-touch sensing, a technique that simplifies sensor/display integration, and enables new forms of interaction not previously possible with other multi-touch sensing techniques. Using low-cost modulated infrared sensors to quickly determine the visual hull of an interactive area, we enable robust real-time sensing of fingers and hands, even in the presence of strong ambient lighting. Our technology allows for 20+ fingers to be detected, many more than through prior visual hull techniques, and our use of wide-angle optoelectonics allows for excellent touch resolution, even in the corners of the sensor. With the ability to track objects in free space, as well as its use as a traditional multi-touch sensor, ZeroTouch opens up a new world of interaction possibilities.

© All rights reserved Moeller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Moeller, Jon, Lupfer, Nic, Hamilton, Bill, Lin, Haiqiao and Kerne, Andruid (2011): intangibleCanvas: free-air finger painting on a projected canvas. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1615-1620. Available online

With the advent of new sensing technologies, precision free-air interaction is becoming viable as a contender for the next generation of expressive, embodied interaction modalities. ZeroTouch [5], a novel multi-touch sensor that allows for free-air multi-finger, multi-object sensing, is one example of this next generation of free-air interfaces. We develop its use in a digitally-projected finger painting application, placing the see-through multitouch sensor in direct line-of-sight between an artist and a remote canvas. This allows the artist to reach through the sensor and paint on the intangibleCanvas as if it were directly in front of them. An iPad is employed as a multimodal workspace for color selection. We evaluate the system through an informal walk-up-and-play installation and comparative study, developing implications for interaction design using this type of precision free-air interface.

© All rights reserved Moeller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Webb, Andrew M. and Kerne, Andruid (2011): Integrating implicit structure visualization with authoring promotes ideation. In: JCDL11 Proceedings of the 2010 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2011. pp. 203-212. Available online

We need to harness the growing wealth of information in digital libraries to support intellectual work involving creative and exploratory processes. Prior research on hypertext authoring shifted the focus from explicit structure to direct presentation of content aided by "implicit" spatial representation of structure. We likewise shift the field of information visualization. Using hypertext's rubric, we redefine what most people think of as "information visualization" as explicit structure visualization. We alternatively address implicit structure visualization, presenting content directly, representing structure with spatiality and other visual features. We integrate authoring to emphasize the role of human thought in learning and ideation. Prior research has shown that people iteratively collect and organize information by clipping magazines, piling clippings in somewhat messy ways, and organizing them. MessyOrganizer is an iterative implicit structure visualization algorithm which, like human practice, gradually collects and organizes information clippings. Content is depicted directly. Structural relationships are visualized implicitly through spatial positioning of related elements, with overlap and translucence. The simulated annealing algorithm is applied to a model of semantic relatedness over a spatial grid. We develop an experiment comparing products created with the integrated environment versus separated visualization and authoring spaces. Results reveal that participants have more novel and varied ideas when visualization is integrated with authoring.

© All rights reserved Webb and Kerne and/or their publisher

 
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Aikens, Christopher, Lucchese, George, Webster, Patrick and Kerne, Andruid (2011): RFV: interactive geographical visualization for citation network exploration. In: JCDL11 Proceedings of the 2010 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2011. pp. 449-450. Available online

Research Field Visualizer (RFV) is a system designed to visualize citation chains for publications within specific disciplines. RFV overlays publication information on geographical displays to aid in locating dense areas of research based on different search criteria, thus exposing a network of interconnected ideas across the world. Within this geographical context, RFV provides an interactive visualization of citation networks, allowing the user to explore chains of publication Our intention is to help people that want to learn about a field, such as prospective graduate students, understand current research directions, track research history, and ultimately find the places where authors are conducting relevant and interesting research.

© All rights reserved Aikens et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Damaraju, Sashikanth and Kerne, Andruid (2011): Comparing multi-touch interaction techniques for manipulation of an abstract parameter space. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2011. pp. 221-224. Available online

The adjustment of multidimensional abstract parameter spaces, used in human-in-the-loop systems such as simulations and visualizations, plays an important role for multi-touch interaction. We investigate new natural forms of interaction to manipulate such parameter spaces. We develop separable multi-touch interaction techniques for abstract parameter space manipulation. We investigate using the index and thumb to perform the often-repeated sub-task of switching between parameters. A user study compares these multi-touch techniques with mouse-based interaction, for the task of color selection, measuring performance and efficiency. Our findings indicate that multi-touch interaction techniques are faster than mouse based interaction.

© All rights reserved Damaraju and Kerne and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Hamilton, William A., Toups, Zachary O. and Kerne, Andruid (2009): Synchronized communication and coordinated views: qualitative data discovery for team game user studies. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4573-4578. Available online

We present a tool for qualitative data discovery that aids researchers in analyzing synchronized log data with audio collected from multiple computers. The tool was originally developed for team games in which the goal of play is to exercise coordination skills. In team coordination games, players cooperate toward a shared objective by communicating effectively and synchronizing their game world actions. To evaluate such games, researchers observe communication between players synchronized with their actions in-game, discovering instances of team coordination. Coordination is a composite of communication and in-game action; thus it is essential to observe both in context. The tool enables simultaneous observation from each player's viewpoint, synchronized with communication using log files and time-stamped audio. Viewpoints and voice tracks can be selectively soloed and muted, enabling researchers to focus attention. The application can be expanded to support logs and audio from other user studies.

© All rights reserved Hamilton et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Toups, Zachary O., Kerne, Andruid, Hamilton, William and Blevins, Alan (2009): Emergent team coordination: from fire emergency response practice to a non-mimetic simulation game. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 341-350. Available online

We take the work practices of fire emergency responders as the basis for developing simulations to teach team coordination. We introduce non-mimetic simulation: economic operational environments that represent human-centered components of practice, such as team structures and information flows, without mimicking concrete aspects of an environment. Emergent team coordination phenomena validate the non-mimetic simulation of fire emergency response. We develop non-mimetic simulation principles through a game, focusing engagement on information distribution, roles, and the need for decisive real time action, while omitting concrete aspects. We describe the game design in detail, including rationale for design iterations. We take the non-mimetic simulation game design to participants for a series of play sessions, investigating how forms of information distribution affect game play. Participants coordinate as a team and, although they are not firefighters, begin to work together in ways that substantively reflect firefighting team coordination practice.

© All rights reserved Toups et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Moeller, Jon and Kerne, Andruid (2009): Scanning FTIR: unobtrusive optoelectronic multi-touch sensing through waveguide transmissivity imaging. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 73-76. Available online

We describe a new method of multi-touch sensing which can be unobtrusively added to existing displays. By coupling individually controlled optoelectronics to the edge of a planar waveguide, our scanning approach overcomes prior disadvantages of optoelectronic multi-touch sensing. Our approach allows for a completely transparent touch surface and easy integration with existing LCD displays.

© All rights reserved Moeller and Kerne and/or their publisher

 
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Koh, Eunyee, Kerne, Andruid and Moeller, Jon (2009): Toward automatic generation of image-text document surrogates to optimize cognition. In: JCDL09 Proceedings of the 2009 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2009. pp. 417-418. Available online

The representation of information collections needs to be optimized for human cognition. Growing information collections play a crucial role in human experiences. While documents often include rich visual components, collections, including personal collections and those generated by search engines, are typically represented lists of text-only surrogates. By concurrently invoking complementary components of human cognition, combined image-text surrogates help people to more effectively see, understand, think about, and remember information collection. This research develops algorithmic methods that use the structural context of images in HTML documents to associate meaningful text and thus derive combined image-text surrogates.

© All rights reserved Koh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kerne, Andruid, Koh, Eunyee, Smith, Steven M., Webb, Andrew and Dworaczyk, Blake (2009): combinFormation: Mixed-initiative composition of image and text surrogates promotes information discovery. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 27 (1) p. 5. Available online

combinFormation is a mixed-initiative creativity support tool for searching, browsing, organizing, and integrating information. Images and text are connected to represent surrogates (enhanced bookmarks), optimizing the use of human cognitive facilities. Composition, an alternative to lists and spatial hypertext, is used to represent a collection of surrogates as a connected whole, using principles from art and design. This facilitates the creative process of information discovery, in which humans develop new ideas while finding and collecting information. To provoke the user to think about the large space of potentially relevant information resources, a generative agent proactively engages in collecting information resources, forming image and text surrogates, and composing them visually. The agent develops the collection and its visual representation over time, enabling the user to see ideas and relationships. To keep the human in control, we develop interactive mechanisms for authoring the composition and directing the agent. In a field study in an interdisciplinary course on The Design Process, over a hundred students alternated using combinFormation and Google+Word to collect prior work on information discovery invention assignments. The students that used combinFormation's mixed-initiative composition of image and text surrogates performed better.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Karlsen, Inger Kristine, Maiden, Neil A. M. and Kerne, Andruid (2009): Inventing Requirements with Creativity Support Tools. In: Glinz, Martin and Heymans, Patrick (eds.) Requirements Engineering Foundation for Software Quality, 15th International Working Conference, REFSQ 2009, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, June 8-9, 2009, Proceedings 2009. pp. 162-174. Available online

2008
 
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Kerne, Andruid, Smith, Steven M., Koh, Eunyee, Choi, Hyun and Graeber, Ross (2008): An Experimental Method for Measuring the Emergence of New Ideas in Information Discovery. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 24 (5) pp. 460-477. Available online

Although sometimes the task that motivates searching, browsing, and collecting information resources is finding a particular fact, humans often use information resources in intellectual and creative tasks that can include comparison, understanding, and discovery. Information discovery tasks involve not only finding relevant information but also seeing relationships among collected information resources and developing new ideas. The hypothesis presented here is that how information is represented impacts the magnitude of human creativity in information discovery tasks. How can we measure this creative cognition? Studies of search have focused on time and accuracy, metrics of limited value for measuring creative discovery. A new experimental method is developed, which measures the emergence of new ideas in information discovery, to evaluate the efficacy of representations. The efficacy of the typical textual list representation for information collections is compared with an alternative representation, combinFormation's composition of image and text surrogates. Representing collections with such compositions increases emergence in information discovery.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Kerne, Andruid, Wakkary, Ron, Nack, Frank, Steggell, Amanda, Jaimes, Alejandro, Candan, K. Selcuk, Bimbo, Alberto Del, Jennings, Pamela and Dulic, Aleksandra (2008): Connecting artists and scientists in multimedia research. In: El-Saddik, Abdulmotaleb, Vuong, Son, Griwodz, Carsten, Bimbo, Alberto Del, Candan, K. Selcuk and Jaimes, Alejandro (eds.) Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Multimedia 2008 October 26-31, 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 1113-1114. Available online

 
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Webb, Andrew and Kerne, Andruid (2008): The in-context slider: a fluid interface component for visualization and adjustment of values while authoring. In: Levialdi, Stefano (ed.) AVI 2008 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 91-99. Available online

2007
 
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Toups, Zachary O. and Kerne, Andruid (2007): Implicit coordination in firefighting practice: design implications for teaching fire emergency responders. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 707-716. Available online

Fire emergency response requires rapidly processing and communicating information to coordinate teams that protect lives and property. Students studying to become fire emergency responders must learn to communicate, process, and integrate information during dangerous, stressful, and time-sensitive work. We are performing an ethnographic investigation that includes interviews with experienced fire emergency responders and observations of team burn training exercises with students. We distill salient components of firefighting practice, which are relevant to the design of fire emergency response education systems. We derive design implications for systems that teach fire emergency responders to deal with issues surrounding the communication and integration of fireground information: the mixing of communication modalities, the distribution of information acquisition sources to create information differential and uncertainty, and audible clues.

© All rights reserved Toups and Kerne and/or ACM Press

 
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Kerne, Andruid and Koh, Eunyee (2007): Creativity support: the mixed-initiative composition space. In: JCDL07: Proceedings of the 7th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2007. p. 509. Available online

Creativity support is an important and challenging emerging area of research. combinFormation is being developed as a tool to support creativity through a mixed-initiative composition space. The system combines searches and information feeds, representing relevant information collections as compositions of image and text surrogates. The composition space affords human manipulation. This method has been shown to support information discovery in The Design Process, an interdisciplinary undergraduate course. In this demo, we demonstrate how combinFormation can be used to explore and discover information in digital libraries such as ACM Digital Library and the International Children's Digital Library.

© All rights reserved Kerne and Koh and/or ACM Press

 
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Kerne, Andruid, Koh, Eunyee, Smith, Steven, Choi, Hyun, Graeber, Ross and Webb, Andrew (2007): Promoting emergence in information discovery by representing collections with composition. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2007, Washington DC, USA. pp. 117-126. Available online

While sometimes the task that motivates searching, browsing, and collecting information resources is finding a particular fact, humans often engage in intellectual and creative tasks, such as comparison, understanding, and discovery. Information discovery tasks involve not only finding relevant information, but also seeing relationships among collected information resources, and developing new ideas. Prior studies of search have focused on time and accuracy, metrics of limited value for measuring creativity. We develop new experimental methods to evaluate the efficacy of representational systems for information discovery by measuring the emergence of new ideas. We also measure the variety of web sites that participants visit when engaging in a creative task, and gather experience report data. We compare the efficacy of the typical format for collections, the textual list with a new format, the composition of image and text surrogates. We conduct an experiment that establishes that representing collections with composition of image and text surrogates promotes emergence in information discovery.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Koh, Eunyee, Kerne, Andruid and Hill, Rodney (2007): Creativity support: information discovery and exploratory search. In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2007. pp. 895-896. Available online

We are developing support for creativity in learning through information discovery and exploratory search. Users engage in creative tasks, such as inventing new products and services. The system supports evolving information needs. It gathers and presents relevant information visually using images and text. Users are able to search, browse, and explore results from multiple queries and interact with information elements by manipulating design and expressing interest. A field study was conducted to evaluate the system in an undergraduate class. The results demonstrated the efficacy of our system for developing creative ideas. Exposure to diverse information in visual and interactive forms is shown to support students engaged in invention tasks.

© All rights reserved Koh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Koh, Eunyee, Kerne, Andruid, Webb, Andrew, Damaraju, Sashikanth and Sturdivant, David (2007): Generating views of the buzz: browsing popular media and authoring using mixed-initiative composition. In: Lienhart, Rainer, Prasad, Anand R., Hanjalic, Alan, Choi, Sunghyun, Bailey, Brian P. and Sebe, Nicu (eds.) Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Multimedia 2007 September 24-29, 2007, Augsburg, Germany. pp. 228-237. Available online

2006
 
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Kerne, Andruid, Koh, Eunyee, Dworaczyk, Blake, Mistrot, J. Michael, Choi, Hyun, Smith, Steven M., Graeber, Ross, Caruso, Daniel, Webb, Andrew, Hill, Rodney and Albea, Joel (2006): combinFormation: a mixed-initiative system for representing collections as compositions of image and text surrogates. In: JCDL06: Proceedings of the 6th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2006. pp. 11-20. Available online

People need to find, work with, and put together information. Diverse activities, such as scholarly research, comparison shopping, and entertainment involve collecting and connecting information resources. We need to represent collections in ways that promote understanding of individual information resources and also their relationships. Representing individual resources with images as well as text makes good use of human cognitive facilities. Composition, an alternative to lists, means putting representations of elements in a collection together using design principles to form a connected whole. We develop combinFormation, a mixed-initiative system for representing collections as compositions of image and text surrogates. The system provides a set of direct manipulation facilities for forming, editing, organizing, and distributing collections as compositions. Additionally, to assist users in sifting through the vast expanse of potentially relevant information resources, the system also includes a generative agent that can proactively engage in processes of collecting information resources and forming image and text surrogates. A generative temporal visual composition agent develops the collection and its visual representation over time, enabling users to see more possibilities. To keep the user in control, we develop interactive techniques that enable the user to direct the agent. For evaluation, we conducted a field study in an undergraduate general education course offered in the architecture department. Alternating groups of students used combinFormation as an aid in preparing one of two major assignments involving information discovery to support processes of invention. The students that used combinFormation were found to perform better.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Graeber, Ross, Kerne, Andruid and Henderson, M. Kathryn (2006): ZooMICSS: a zoomable map image collection sensemaking system (the Katrina Rita context). In: Nahrstedt, Klara, Turk, Matthew, Rui, Yong, Klas, Wolfgang and Mayer-Patel, Ketan (eds.) Proceedings of the 14th ACM International Conference on Multimedia October 23-27, 2006, Santa Barbara, CA, USA. pp. 795-796. Available online

 
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Webb, Andrew, Kerne, Andruid, Koh, Eunyee, Joshi, Pranesh, Park, YoungJoo and Graeber, Ross (2006): Choreographic buttons: promoting social interaction through human movement and clear affordances. In: Nahrstedt, Klara, Turk, Matthew, Rui, Yong, Klas, Wolfgang and Mayer-Patel, Ketan (eds.) Proceedings of the 14th ACM International Conference on Multimedia October 23-27, 2006, Santa Barbara, CA, USA. pp. 451-460. Available online

2005
 
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Kerne, Andruid, Smith, Steven M., Choi, Hyun, Graeber, Ross and Caruso, Daniel (2005): Evaluating navigational surrogate formats with divergent browsing tasks. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1537-1540. Available online

Navigational surrogates are representations that stand for information resources within search engine result sets, e?commerce sites, and digital libraries. They also form the basis of personal collections of media, such as web pages. Our hypothesis is that the formats of individual surrogates and collections play an important role in how people use collections. We are particularly interested in processes of information discovery, in which ideas are iteratively reformulated in the context of working with information. To investigate how the representation of navigational surrogates affects how people work with information, we have created a collection of undergraduate psychology curriculum resources in 3 alternative formats: a linear list of textual elements, a spatialized set of textual elements, and a spatialized set of labeled images that have been composited. To evaluate navigation with these surrogate formats during information discovery, we designed divergent browsing tasks, that is, tasks that require assembling information from multiple diverse sources. A within-subjects evaluation indicates that users prefer the spatial labeled images format, and navigate more effectively with it.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mandic, Mirko and Kerne, Andruid (2005): Using intimacy, chronology and zooming to visualize rhythms in email experience. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1617-1620. Available online

Experiences of intimacy and connectedness through social networks are vital to human sense of well-being. We live in an electronic habitat. Electronic mail functions as a medium of interpersonal exchange. As it accumulates, email data becomes more than a collection of reminders. It is a diary we didn't know we were keeping, and a potential source of valuable insight into the structure and dynamics of one's social network. Current interfaces do little to help users see patterns of social interaction within email data. We introduce a multiscale email interface that utilizes computed intimacy measures and chronology as parameters for information visualization. Rhythms of intimacy in email experience are made visible as patterns of color and shapes in a zoomable chronological grid. Qualitative user experience data indicates that such an email visualization can provide striking insights into the experience of social connectedness over time. These insights potentially enable users to better manage how they invest time and energy into personal and work relationships, and thus to improve overall sense of well-being.

© All rights reserved Mandic and Kerne and/or ACM Press

 
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Aley, Eric, Cooper, Trina, Graeber, Ross, Kerne, Andruid, Overby, Kyle and Toups, Zachary O. (2005): Censor chair: exploring censorship and social presence through psychophysiological sensing. In: Zhang, Hongjiang, Chua, Tat-Seng, Steinmetz, Ralf, Kankanhalli, Mohan S. and Wilcox, Lynn (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Multimedia November 6-11, 2005, Singapore. pp. 922-929. Available online

 
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Stenner, Jack, Kerne, Andruid and Williams, Yauger (2005): Playas: homeland mirage. In: Zhang, Hongjiang, Chua, Tat-Seng, Steinmetz, Ralf, Kankanhalli, Mohan S. and Wilcox, Lynn (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th ACM International Conference on Multimedia November 6-11, 2005, Singapore. pp. 1057-1058. Available online

2004
 
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Kerne, Andruid and Smith, Steven M. (2004): The information discovery framework. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 357-360. Available online

This paper continues the movement from technology centered to human centered approaches in the study of tasks that involve finding, understanding, and using information, and tools that support these tasks. The iterative role of information as a stimulus to cognition is considered. The information discovery framework consists of a flowchart of connected human cognitive and digital computer states and processes. The purpose of the framework is to inform the design of tools for finding and using information. Divergent thinking laboratory tasks serve as an evaluation method.

© All rights reserved Kerne and Smith and/or ACM Press

 
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Khandelwal, Madhur, Kerne, Andruid and Mistrot, J. Michael (2004): Manipulating history in generative hypermedia. In: Proceedings of the Fifteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2004. pp. 139-140. Available online

We continue to develop a generative hypermedia system that uses composition for browsing, collecting and organizing information samples from web pages. The system's generative actions of collecting information samples and composing them visually are conducted iteratively over time, based on an adaptable user model. The system presents the ongoing generation of the composition to the user in an interactive information space. In this space, the user can directly manipulate the composition through interactive design operations, and affect the model by expressing positive or negative interest in each sample. We are developing mechanisms for manipulating the time-based medium of the evolving information space. Interaction design affords linear timeline traversal and non-linear time travel. Extended tape recorder metaphor controls, including jog-shuttle based navigation, provide the user with flexible means for operating the system's generative functionalities, and linearly traversing session history. We introduce a door-latch metaphor that enables one of several considered forms of non-linear time travel. Users can change history by retroactively locking an information sample in position across time.

© All rights reserved Khandelwal et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Chang, Michelle, Leggett, John, Furuta, Richard, Kerne, Andruid, Williams, J. Patrick, Burns, Samuel A. and Bias, Randolph G. (2004): Collection understanding. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. pp. 334-342. Available online

Collection understanding shifts the traditional focus of retrieval in large collections from locating specific artifacts to gaining a comprehensive view of the collection. Visualization tools are critical to the process of efficient collection understanding By presenting simple visual interfaces and intuitive methods of interacting with a collection, users come to understand the essence of the collection by focusing on the artifacts. This paper discusses a practical approach for enhancing collection understanding in image collections.

© All rights reserved Chang et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Azeez, Babatunde, Kerne, Andruid, Southern, Joseph, Summerfield, Bridgette, Aholu, Isaac and Sharmin, Eshita (2004): Sharing culture shock through a collection of experiences. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. p. 402. Available online

Culture shock and cultural adaptation are phenomena that international students experience, while crossing boundaries On their arrival to the U.S. displaced students from the Third World often feel isolated, afraid, inferior, and insecure. Digital collections can serve as a medium for sharing sensations and experiences. They can help overcome the sense of isolation and culture shock, by illustrating to an individual how others have similar experiences We are building a digital collection to support this exchange of experiences In collecting experiences, we found that first person ethnographic interviews are more effective as a method for data collection, when they are conducted with a sense of informality Woezor, a prototype system, was developed to structure and present these collections, using the Greenstone digital libraries software.

© All rights reserved Azeez et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mandic, Mirko and Kerne, Andruid (2004): faMailiar & Intimacy-Based Email Visualization. In: InfoVis 2004 - 10th IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 10-12 October, 2004, Austin, TX, USA. . Available online

2003
 
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Kerne, Andruid, Khandelwal, Madhur and Sundaram, Vikram (2003): Publishing evolving metadocuments on the web. In: Proceedings of the Fourteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2003. pp. 104-105. Available online

Metadocuments are documents that consist primarily of references to other documents, and elements within them. Our active browsing web visualization tool generates an evolving series of navigable metadocument snapshots over time. The granularity of browsing is shifted, from documents to the finer grained information elements, which are metadocument constituents. The program conducts expression-directed automatic retrieval of information from the web. It performs procedural visual composition of the information elements to form spatial hypertext. The user can express interest and design intentions through direct manipulation interactions with the visualized information elements. As prior versions of the tool lacked the capabilities of save and load, they were entirely process-oriented. The metadocuments existed only as transient states. This paper is an early report on our new metadocument authoring and publishing capability, and its potential uses. Saved metadocuments can be published on the web. Once published, they can serve both as static navigable metadocuments, and as the jumping off point from which the information space represented by the collected elements can continue to evolve.

© All rights reserved Kerne et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kerne, Andruid, Sundaram, Vikram, Wang, Jin, Khandelwal, Madhur and Mistrot, J. Michael (2003): Human + agent: creating recombinant information. In: Rowe, Lawrence A., Vin, Harrick M., Plagemann, Thomas, Shenoy, Prashant J. and Smith, John R. (eds.) Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM International Conference on Multimedia November 2-8, 2003, Berkeley, CA, USA. pp. 454-455. Available online

2002
 
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Kerne, Andruid (2002): Concept-context-design: a creative model for the development of interactivity. In: Proceedings of the 2002 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2002. pp. 192-199. Available online

Existing CHI interaction models are focused on understanding the needs of users. They begin with user tasks and user feedback. While the involvement of users is critical for human computer interaction development, so is the imagination the artist-scientist-designer-developer. We constitute a legitimate source of impetus in the definition and development of interactive artifacts, as well as functioning as interpreters, measurers, and respondents. The development of interactivity is a fundamentally creative process. This paper distills a creative model for the development of interactivity as a residue of the CollageMachine development experience. Both the model and the artifact are components that contribute to the integrated approach of interface ecology.

© All rights reserved Kerne and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Kerne, Andruid (1998): Cultural Representation in Interface Ecosystems: Amendments to the ACM/Interactions Design Awards Criteria. In Interactions, 5 (1) pp. 37-43. Available online

 
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Kerne, Andruid (1998): Interface Ecology. In Interactions, 5 (1) p. 64. Available online

 
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