User Experience Video 1 - Marc's introduction to User Experience and Experience Design

 
Video 1: User Experience - Marc's introduction to User Experience and Experience Design

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Transcription: User Experience Video 1 - Marc's introduction to User Experience and Experience Design

Rikke:  You may think we are in Russia because of the church behind me, but we are actually in Germany, in Darmstadt. We are here to meet the Professor, Marc Hassenzahl, who is a professor in user experience and experience design. And this is what he is going to tell us about in his home villa in Damster.

So, Marc, what is user experience, experience design as well as experience. It is all related so close, but can you tell us what you think it is?

Marc:   I think it is really difficult to take all these different things apart. But let me start with the term user experience. A term I really - I kind of dis - dislike a bit because - because of the focus on usage only and the user and it -  you know, it is like as if it would be so closely rooted only in action, but experience is a much broader field, I would say. I would rather like to talk about experiences or experiencing later on and experience design as a way to create that experience.

For me, user experience is the field of study so there happen to be some people in the context of interactive products coming out of the usability community that thought maybe we should change our models a bit and came up - they came up with this word and I think it is called user because usability was always very deeply rooted in usage when people invented that term, you know, it hadn't been the consumer, but naturally the user. And experience is just - how shall I say, it is just more focus on the user; on his or her psychology, on emotions and stuff like that. So just stressing that we should be even more focused on the user.

Over time, somehow, people started to take that experience term literally and try to explore, you know, what would it mean if we really would design for experience. It is not just take that as a term for denoting more - more closeness to people. I think that started like six or seven years ago, people started to think about what it actually is and applications popped up.

Rikke:  So designing with this in mind what - could you take examples of any products?

Marc:   Basically I think they are not that much products out there at the moment. I would like to distinguish two different kinds of ways of looking at experience. One is I mean you have something like a moment by moment experience. In that moment you feel somehow, you do something, you think, you and that all that together is like this experience you have in the moment. And this focuses very much on you know, what we do and what we think in a particular moment and focuses also very much on the how. If you use a product on how - how does it feel and how to touch, how is it, does it look like is it in your hands how does it fit and stuff like that.

This is one way of looking at experience and I think a product like the iPhone or the iPod touch with this new way of interacting with the multi touch and physics model in these that is more - that is more catering to this kind of experience. I will prefer calling it the aesthetics of interaction. So for me, it is not really the thing I am after.

Rikke:  What are you after?

Marc:   I am more after like I think this window the consciousness. The moment by moment experience you have is just three seconds or whatever, it is very, very small. And the most of our time we are working on memories of experience that we have and they are quite different because the moment you experience something you have it and you encode it somehow in your memory and you try to make sense of it, to create meaning you forget things. What you do is you construct a story of usage and it has a beginning and end, has a structure and this is what you actually remember, this is what you communicate to other people, this is the reality you had with the product. This is nothing new. That is actually how we - how we as how we as humans define ourselves. We even have our own memory system for that, episodic memory that stores these stories of our lives. And as long as we interact with certain kind of technology we create those stories as well.

This is my idea of experience. So if you put in more academically then the difference between experiencing I would say and - and experience as a story as a narrative. And I would like to design for those, for these stories. On one hand that would mean that we have 0t understand what these stories contain, what is in - what is in it, what is important tin that story? Are they all very personal? So would we have the same story? Can we talk about it? Will you understand my stories and vice versa and how can you set stories to put it - put them into products. The design part would then be retelling a story or telling a story through that product.

Rikke:  Can you give an example? It is kind of intangible.

Marc:   Yea, I understand. For me, I mean, there are not that many products around. The wake up light from Philips, for me, is a very good example for those who don't know it I have one here. It looks like this. And what it does is you set a certain wake up time and half an hour before that it starts lighting up and it gets brighter and brighter. And the moment you have to you want it to get up it - it plays back the sound of birds and some bells or whatever you like. And you can see the story through that object. You can see how they went to people, asked them what is your favorite way of waking up and they said oh, I hate my alarm clock but sometimes if I don't have to get up and the sun rises and I am just woken by the light and hear the birds that is a nice, that is a very nice situation. Now, the problem is that - that life doesn't work like that so we can't have the experience all the time. The product tries to give it to us even in situations - like a surrogate experience, even in situations where we can't have it. And now you can say oh that is questionable because it is just fake. That's not - I don't believe in that. I think it can work like - like you know, love mothers the surrogate experience. It is not the real thing, but it is still more meaningful to us then a ringing alarm clock. This is a very technical solution. This would be a more experiential solution I would say.

And then the interesting thing is if you look at that design wise, you know, I'm an industrial designer, I think it is not - it is nothing very special. Maybe it is not even not very beautiful I would say. And the interaction is a bit awkward and so on. And this matters. Definitely matters and it should matter. The basic thing about it is the experience it creates and in that term, in that sense it doesn't matter much to the user whether this is exactly or not it is more like a stand in or a placeholder for a certain experience you can have. This is, I think, quite different from for example, something like the iPhone.

Rikke:  Yea. Describe the difference, briefly.

Marc:   Yea, the iPhone is a - for me it is just an infrastructure, it is a nice mobile phone. The interesting part, the experiential part is what the applications people load on it because that will create new opportunities. But - but what they actually did is they took that gadget and they designed very nice aesthetics of interaction and that feels - it feels good. It is an experience only valid for the product so in that sense. And I think it is quite a difference because it puts the product in the - in the floor. It may get something it makes it it is novel and special and I can throw it around, very materialistic thing in that sense. It also feels better maybe than some buttons. It is all you know, it's - it's the iPhone says that I am so cool, I am so different you can't have -  it just feels better working with me and I would be more in - in products where you just, you know, forget the whole product and then care about the experience I just created.

Rikke:  So this is more post materialistic.

Marc:   Exactly, yea.

Rikke:  You still have a product, but the product is not in - in the focus.

Marc:   Yea, I like that - that expression it transcends its encasing. I don't think the iPhone - the iPhone does it with the application stores, for example. It gives people, it opens up the possibilities you can write your own application, put it there. You can have everything on that infrastructure. Its appearance is in the application not in the - in the interaction with the device. I think we can still have technological progress in consumer electronics, but at a certain point it becomes just silly. It can't - what else can you put into a mobile phone? I - I can't imagine much more. So - so first we have the functions, then we have the aesthetics of interaction. Not everybody has a touch screen so what are the next steps. I think then, at a certain point we switch from a more technology innovation to again socially driven or human driven innovations where we just use the same technologies all the time as infrastructure but come up with new experiences.

Rikke:  So this way of designing with the experience in mind is it something new or has it always been like this?

Marc:   For me, I think it is something new. And the difference is that [inaudible[00:10:55] in the usability community everybody always said that they have the user in mind. They are still very much focused on the product and the technology used. And I think it is quite natural because that is where the skills are. If you are a manufacturer of telephones, mobile phones, you know the technology of mobile phones. Naturally, you tend to [inaudible[00:11:19] you tend to argue, hey, I manufacturing those and I am selling those so I want to make them good but - but you know it is still the technology I am designing. And usability is actually doing that making it easier, but never questioning the motto behind that. Never questioning is a mobile phone the right device. We are on that shift from a more materialistic to a more post materialistic society which means the post materialistic means that I'm as a person, I much  more care about positive experiences I had in my life. I am not caring about possessions so much and about having things. Sometimes we want to have, we still want it. But I think it is just different shades of materialism.

I have a lot of friends, I am 40 years old, I have a lot of friends that are in music and there are plenty of them they want to have the record. But I have also younger friends, they don't care that much. They care about the music. And I think that is like different shades of materialism. If you have the urge to own something that is more materialistic. And if you have this urge of going through something and not only owning that but owning that experience, memories of that and - and I think that is why digital cameras are so - are so popular because people are much more in experiences and they need ways to document it and because they won't have the materials to signify this experience. So I think with this change it becomes quite, it is something new and you can also see that the industry is not so much adapted to it. If you look at technology manufacturers they do certain types of technologies they are good at. And yea, they put it - they put it in nice casings, they make nice little designs and good interface and so on and so on, but still a phone is a phone is a phone. They never rethink the whole thing.

Rikke:  Thank you so much, Marc, for sharing your knowledge about user experience and experience design. And if you want to know more about it and how to put these insights into use when designing products you should have a look at our second interview with Marc. And you can also read the chapter he is writing, has written at interactiondesign.org and you can also find more chapters like his and find more videos like this one as well. Thank you so much for your time and interest.

 

 

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        Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
        Legal Code (full licence text): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
  16. CC-Att-SA-3:
        Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0
        Legal Code (full licence text): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
  17. CC-Att-SA-2:
        Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Unported
        Legal Code (full licence text): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/
  18. CC-Att-SA:
        Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
        Legal Code (full licence text): http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
  19. Unknown:
        Copyright status unknown
  20. Trademarks and logos:
        All trademarks, logos, service marks, collective marks, design rights, personality rights or similar rights that are mentioned, used or cited by The Interaction Design Foundation and its authors are the property of their respective owners. The use of any trademark in our materials does not vest in the author or The Interaction Design Foundation any trademark ownership rights in such trademarks, nor does the use of such trademarks imply any affiliation with or endorsement of The Interaction Design Foundation and its authors by such owners. As such The Interaction Design Foundation can not grant any rights to use any otherwise protected materials. Your use of any such or similar incorporeal property is at your own risk. Words which we have reason to believe constitute trademarks may or may not have been labelled as such. However, neither the presence nor absence of such labels should be regarded as affecting the legal status of any trademarks.

While most material produced by The Interaction Design Foundation is free to use under its respective license as outlined above, some materials may be subject to additional legal restrictions when they are used in particular circumstances or in particular ways. These limitations may arise from laws related to trademarks, patents, personality rights, political censorship, or any of many other legal causes which are entirely independent from the copyright status of the work. For example, if you use a public domain image (i.e. uncopyrighted) of an apple to sell computers, you will violate the trademark rights of Apple Computer, Inc.

In addition, content linked from a page/chapter/book (in the online versions) is not covered by one of our licenses unless specifically noted. For example, pages may link to videos or slide decks that are not covered. The design of Interaction-Design.org (graphics, html, client-side scripts, etc.) is copyright of Mads Soegaard.

iv. The Site Terms and Conditions

These Site Terms and Conditions ("Terms") is a legally binding agreement made by and between The Interaction Design Foundation and you, personally and, if applicable, on behalf of the entity for whom you are using this web site or any of its services (collectively, "you"). These Terms govern your use of The Interaction Design Foundation's web site, www.interaction-design.org, and The Interaction Design Foundation's services so please read the following carefully.

By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree that you have read, understand, and agree to be bound by this Terms. if you do not agree to be so bound, do not access or use the web site.

Internet technology and the applicable laws, rules, and regulations change frequently. Accordingly, The Interaction Design Foundation reserves the right to make changes to these Terms at any time. Your continued use of the web site constitutes assent to any new or modified provision of this Terms that may be posted on the web site.

These Terms addresses your legal rights and obligations and includes important disclaimers and choice of law and forum provisions.

1. Choice of Law and Forum Provisions (Governing Law)

Interaction-Design.org is run by The Interaction Design Foundation, a privately held corporation residing in Aarhus, Denmark. You agree that these Terms and your use of Interaction-Design.org and the materials produced by The Interaction Design Foundation are governed by the laws of Denmark. You hereby consent to the exclusive jurisdiction and venue of the courts, tribunals, agencies and other dispute resolution organizations in Denmark in all disputes

  1. arising out of, relating to, or concerning Interaction-Design.org, The Interaction Design Foundation, and/or these Terms
  2. in which Interaction-Design.org, The Interaction Design Foundation, and/or these Terms is an issue or a material fact
  3. or in which Interaction-Design.org, The Interaction Design Foundation, and/or these Terms is referenced in a paper filed in a court, tribunal, agency or other dispute resolution organization.

The Interaction Design Foundation has endeavoured to comply with all legal requirements known to it in creating and maintaining Interaction-Design.org and The Interaction Design Foundation, but makes no representation that materials on Interaction-Design.org or produced by The Interaction Design Foundation are appropriate or available for use in any particular jurisdiction. You are responsible for compliance with applicable laws. Any use in contravention of this provision or any provision of these Terms is at your own risk and, if any part of these Terms is invalid or unenforceable under applicable law, the invalid or unenforceable provision will be deemed superseded by a valid, enforceable provision that most closely matches the intent of the original provision and the remainder of these Terms shall govern such use.

2. Liability

Your use of and browsing Interaction-Design.org is at your own risk. The Interaction Design Foundation does not warrant that the software used for Interaction-Design.org, and the information, material, and content on it, or any other services and materials provided by means of Interaction-Design.org or by The Interaction Design Foundation are error-free, or that their use will be uninterrupted. The Interaction Design Foundation expressly disclaims all warranties related to the above-mentioned subject matter, including, without limitation, those of accuracy, condition, merchantability and fitness for particular purpose. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary on Interaction-Design.org, in no event shall The Interaction Design Foundation be liable for any loss of profits, revenues, indirect, special, incidental, consequential, or other similar damages arising out of or in connection with Interaction-Design.org or out of the use of any of the services proposed by means of Interaction-Design.org.

3. Updates

Internet technology, publishing technology, and the applicable laws, rules, and regulations change frequently. Accordingly, The Interaction Design Foundation reserves the unilateral right to update, modify, change and alter its Site Terms and Conditions as well as Copyright Terms at any time. All such updates, modifications, changes and alterations are binding on all users and browsers of Interaction-Design.org, readers of electronic and non-eletronic versions of the publications produced by The Interaction Design Foundation. Such updates will be posted on Interaction-Design.org.

4. Legal Disclaimer

The Interaction Design Foundation and its authors make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information, material, or content on Interaction-Design.org.

THE MATERIAL AND CONTENT POSTED ON INTERACTION-DESIGN.ORG AND ANY CONTENT PROUDCED BY - OR PUBLISHED THROUGH THE INTERACTION DESIGN FOUNDATION ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS WARRANTY OR IMPLIED WARRANTY OF ANY KIND INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, NON-INFRINGEMENT OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, OR FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE INTERACTION DESIGN FOUNDATION BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF PROFITS, BUSINESS INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF INFORMATION) ARISING OUT OF THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO USE THE MATERIALS, EVEN IF THE INTERACTION DESIGN FOUNDATION HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

Because some jurisdictions prohibit the exclusion or limitation of liability for consequential and or incidental damages, the above limitation may not apply to you. Furthermore, The Interaction Design Foundation does not warrant the accuracy or completeness of information of links or other items contained within these materials that have been provided by third parties.

5. Provision regarding change in attribution of copyrighted materials

Please contact us at mads@interaction-design.org if you, or your organization, wish to correct or change attribution or presentation of any image/material used on Interaction-Design.org, which you, or your organization, are the rightful copyright holder of. We will request that you submit proof of your ownership of the copyright on this material but will act immediately on any reasonable request.

6. Notice and prodecure for claims of copyright infringement

Every effort has been made by the individual contributing authors as well as The Interaction Design Foundation to discover and contact copyright holders of artwork/illustrations/content used on Interaction-Design.org. To the extent that a copyright holder could not be found or an inadvertent permissions or copyright error was made, The Interaction Design Foundation stands ready to remove content upon notice and request by a copyright holder. In the case that you believe that any content or other material provided through Interaction-Design.org infringes your copyright, you should notify The Interaction Design Foundation of your infringement claim in accordance with the procedure set forth below.

We will process each notice of alleged infringement which The Interaction Design Foundation receives and take appropriate action in accordance with applicable intellectual property laws. A notification of claimed copyright infringement should be emailed to mads@interaction-design.org (subject: "Takedown Request"). You may also contact us by mail at:

The Interaction Design Foundation
Chr. Molbechs Vej 4
DK-8000 Aarhus C.
Denmark

To be effective, the notification must be in writing and contain the following information:

  1. an electronic or physical signature of the copyright owner or the person authorized to act on behalf of the owner of the copyright interest
  2. a description of the copyrighted work that you claim has been infringed
  3. a description of where the material that you claim is infringing is located on Interaction-Design.org that is reasonably sufficient to enable us to identify and locate the material;
  4. how The Interaction Design Foundation can contact you, such as your address, telephone number, and email address
  5. a written statement by you that you have a good faith belief that the disputed use is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law
  6. if you represent a publisher, a written statement by you that you have a good faith belief that the material has not been placed in the public domain, or licenced under another licence, before you acquired the copyright as this would possibly invalidate your copyright
  7. and a statement by you, made under penalty of perjury, that the above information in your notice is accurate and that you are the copyright owner or authorized to act on the copyright owner's behalf.

7. Trademarks and other rights

All trademarks, logos, service marks, collective marks, design rights, personality rights or similar rights that are mentioned, used or cited by The Interaction Design Foundation and its authors are the property of their respective owners. The use of any trademark in our materials does not vest in the author or The Interaction Design Foundation any trademark ownership rights in such trademarks, nor does the use of such trademarks imply any affiliation with or endorsement of The Interaction Design Foundation and its authors by such owners. As such The Interaction Design Foundation can not grant any rights to use any otherwise protected materials. Your use of any such or similar incorporeal property is at your own risk. Words which we have reason to believe constitute trademarks may or may not have been labelled as such. However, neither the presence nor absence of such labels should be regarded as affecting the legal status of any trademarks.

8. Screenshots

Screenshots of copyrighted computer software, for which the copyright is held by the author(s) or the company that created the software, is believed to fall under the fair use doctrine in the US (and similar laws in other countries). It is believed that reproduction for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, or research is not copyright infringement. If you reuse screenshots, as well as any other information provided by The Interaction Design Foundation, you do so at your own risk and under the copyright laws of your country.

9. Copyright of Abstracts

Abstracts in the Wiki Bibliography (/references/) are submitted by their authors who use the wiki to make their research as accessible as possible. When a page on Interaction-Design.org cites/references/lists a work from the bibliography, its abstract is included. However, abstracts have varying copyrights depending which publisher the work is published through. You should assume that an abstract is copyright, all rights reserved, of its publisher and/or author and therefore always use/cite abstracts according to Fair Use. You may visit the publisher's website to learn about the specific copyright terms (e.g. ACM, IEEE, or Springer) or contact the author directly. Bottom line: Cite/use abstracts according to the principles of fair use as it may otherwise be construed as a copyright infringement and subject to legal action.

10. User Submissions / User Content

You understand and acknowledge that additions to the Wiki Bibliography (including article abstracts), additions the Conference Calendar (including conference descriptions), user-contributed notes on each page (including text, photographs, graphics), or other materials posted by users on Interaction-Design.org ("Content") are the sole responsibility of the person from whom such Content originated. This means that you, and not The Interaction Design Foundation, are entirely responsible for all Content that you upload, post or otherwise make available to other users of Interaction-Design.org.

When submitting content to Interaction-Design.org, you agree to not:

  1. impersonate any person or entity or falsely state or otherwise misrepresent your affiliation with a person or entity;
  2. upload, post or otherwise make available any Content that you do not have a right to make available under any law or under contractual or fiduciary relationships (such as inside information, proprietary and confidential information learned or disclosed as part of employment relationships or under nondisclosure agreements);
  3. upload, post or otherwise make available any Content that infringes any patent, trademark, trade secret, copyright or other proprietary rights ("Rights") of any party;
  4. upload, post or otherwise make available any Content that is unlawful, harmful, threatening, abusive, harassing, tortious, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, libelous, invasive of another's privacy, hateful, or racially, ethnically or otherwise objectionable;

You acknowledge that The Interaction Design Foundation shall have the right to remove any Content that violates these Site Terms and Conditions or is otherwise objectionable.

11. Third Party Websites

If we provide links or pointers to other websites, no inference or assumption should be made that The Interaction Design Foundation operates, controls, or is otherwise connected with these websites. When you click on a link within Interaction-Design.org, we will not warn you that you have left a Site and are subject to the terms and conditions (including privacy policies) of the destination website. In some cases it may be less obvious than others that you have left a Site and reached another website. Please be careful to read the terms of use and privacy policy of any website before you provide any confidential information or engage in any transactions. You should not rely on these Terms for another website. The Interaction Design Foundation is not responsible for the content or practices of any other website. By using Interaction-Design.org, you acknowledge and agree that The Interaction Design Foundation is not responsible or liable to you for any content or other materials hosted and served from any third party website.

12. Email communication: Confidential and proprietary information notice

Email messages sent from members of The Interaction Design Foundation, including emails generated from the use of the interaction-design.org website, are proprietary to The Interaction Design Foundation, and are intended solely for the use of the individual to whom they are addressed. Such messages may contain privileged or confidential information and should not be circulated or used for any purpose other than for what they are intended. If you receive a message from a member of The Interaction Design Foundation in error, please notify the sender immediately. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that you are strictly prohibited from using, copying, altering, or disclosing the contents of the message. The Interaction Design Foundation accepts no responsibility for loss or damage arising from the use of the information transmitted by email message including damage from virus.

13. Usage conditions

Please make sure that you understand that the information provided by The Interaction Design Foundation is being provided freely, and that no kind of agreement or contract is created between you and the owners, partners, users, or authors of this site, the owners of the servers upon which it is housed, the individual contributors of the The Interaction Design Foundation, any project administrators, sysops or anyone else who is in any way connected with this project. If you choose to use or copy anything from from this site it does not create or imply any contractual or extracontractual liability on the part of The Interaction Design Foundation or any of its members, partners, sponsors, contributors or other users. Your use of any such or similar incorporeal property is at your own risk.

14. Termination

The Interaction Design Foundation will have the right to terminate your access to the Web Site if it reasonably believes you have breached any of the terms and conditions of these Terms. Following termination, you will not be permitted to use the Web Site. If your access to the Web Site is terminated, The Interaction Design Foundation reserves the right to exercise whatever means it deems necessary to prevent unauthorized access to the Web Site, including, but not limited to, technological barriers, IP mapping, and direct contact with your Internet Service Provider. These Terms will survive indefinitely unless and until The Interaction Design Foundation chooses to terminate them, regardless of whether any account you open is terminated by you or The Interaction Design Foundation or if you have the right to access or use the Web Site.

15. Force Majeure, website downtime, and service outages

The Interaction Design Foundation will not be liable for failing to perform under these Terms because of any event beyond its reasonable control, including, without limitation, a labor disturbance, an Internet outage or interruption of service, a communications outage, failure by a service provider to The Interaction Design Foundation to perform, fire, terrorism, natural disaster, or war.

16. Limitation of Actions

You acknowledge and agree that, regardless of any statute or law to the contrary, any claim or cause of action you may have arising out of, relating to, or connected with your use of the Web Site, must be filed within one calendar year after such claim or cause of action arises, or forever be barred.

17. Payments

Online payment is accepted by Paypal. The Interaction Design Foundation does not process credit card payments directly or ever see, retain, or use your credit card information.

18. Taxes and VAT

In the name of Simplicity for our members/clients and the online User Experience, our prices always include VAT when applicable. The Interaction Design Foundation is based in Denmark so we pay 25% VAT of payments - depending on which originating country the member or customer is from.

19. Ownership of Interaction-Design.org, The Interaction Design Foundation, and its services

Interaction-Design.org is owned and operated by The Interaction Design Foundation, an LLC incorporated under the laws of Denmark, with office in Aarhus, Denmark.

Address:
The Interaction Design Foundation
Chr. Molbechs Vej 4
DK-8000 Aarhus C.
Denmark

20. Changes to the Web Site

The Interaction Design Foundation may, in its sole discretion, change, modify, suspend, make improvements to, or discontinue any aspect of the Web Site, temporarily or permanently, at any time without notice to you, and The Interaction Design Foundation will not be liable for doing so.

21. Additional Terms

These Terms contain the entire understanding of you and The Interaction Design Foundation regarding the use of the Web Site and the services of The Interaction Design Foundation, and supersedes all prior and contemporaneous agreements and understandings between you and The Interaction Design Foundation relating thereto. These Terms will be binding upon each party hereto and its successors and permitted assigns. These Terms and all of your rights and obligations under them may not be assignable or transferable by you without the prior written consent of The Interaction Design Foundation. No failure or delay by a party in exercising any right, power, or privilege under these Terms will operate as a waiver thereof, nor will any single or partial exercise of any right, power or privilege preclude any other or further exercise thereof or the exercise of any other right, power, or privilege under these Terms. You and The Interaction Design Foundation are independent contractors, and no agency, partnership, joint venture, employee-employer relationship is intended or created by these Terms. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision of these Terms will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provision of these Terms, all of which will remain in full force and effect.

22. Legal Disputes

Any dispute arising from the use of Interaction-Design.org or the interpretation of the terms is governed by the laws of Denmark, and shall be settled by the courts of Denmark. All communications regarding legal matters must be made in writing to

The Interaction Design Foundation
Chr. Molbechs Vej 4
DK-8000 Aarhus C.
Denmark

iv. Site Privacy Policy

1. Summary

The Interaction Design Foundation collects no more data about you than most other websites.

Any membership information you provide to us will be used by us in order to maintain a register of members and supply you with any goods and services you have requested from our web site.

Edits, comments, commentaries and other contributions are published, and except in very limited circumstances, will be a permanent part of this site. If you decide contribute, you must keep this in mind. Your contributions will be subject to the Site Terms and Conditions and our Site IP/Copyright policy.

Under "The Act on Processing of Personal Data", incorporated under Danish law, you may request a copy of the information we hold on you (for which we may charge a fee to offset our administration costs) by writing to us .

This privacy policy will be reviewed, and may be revised, from time to time. You may wish to revisit it regularly.

2. No selling of information

We do not share or sell email addresses, obtained via communication with visitors, with anyone. Neither will any identifying data be disclosed or sold to any third party for any purpose. Data we collect through logging visits to our site (orginating IP, referral data, browser and platform type, traffic flows, geographical area of request, etc.) is only used in an aggregated form, which means we will not make any effort to identify users of Interaction-Design.org. The data is only used for server administration, fault finding, site improvement, etc. - as is done on most websites.

Aggregate (and thus completely non-identifying) statistics generated from these logs may be reported as part of research results or may be published on this site as a curiosity.

3. Cookies

Our sites may use cookies. This is often as a convenience for you to enable certain site features.

You may wish to clear these cookies and the browser cache if you wish to refrain from revealing any identifying information, especially if you are using a public or shared computer. You may also wish to disable your browser from accepting cookies.

4. Private logging

Any time you visit a page on the internet, you send quite a bit of information to the server. The webservers that host this site maintain access logs with the information that you send. This information is used to provide site statistics and to get an idea of popular pages and what sites link here. We do not intend to use these logs to identify legitimate users.

The data logged may be used by us to solve technical problems with the site and, in cases of abuse of this site, to investigate the abuse.

We also use web analytics services to get a general idea of the kinds of traffic our websites get in order to provide better services and to set benchmarks for how we are doing in meeting the OKFN's goals.

Again, if you are concerned about attempts to match your IP address to your identity, you may wish to use an anonymous browsing service or attempt some means to obfuscate your real IP address.

5. Data release policy

Our policy is only to release the data we collect in the following circumstances:

  • As required by law, such as in response to a valid request from law enforcement.
  • To designated third parties to resolve or investigate abuse complaints.
  • When the information is related to spiders or bots, usually when investigating technical issues.
  • For abusive users, we may release information to assist in attempting to block the abusive user or to complain to that user's Internet Service Provider.
  • If necessary to defend legal claims against us by third parties.
  • When we deem it necessary to protect the property or rights of the user community, or this website.

6. Public data and publishing

Browsing this site doesn't reveal your identity publicly, though see Private Logging later in this document for more information.

7. Author identification

When making contributions to this site (e.g. posting a comment, commentaries, editing a page in the wiki, etc), a name and email address may be required. You do not have to select your real name or use your regular email address. If you are concerned, you may wish to get a free email account or attempt to use a remail service.

Your activity on our website may be identified by your IP address. These numbers could potentially be traceable to identifying information about you, whether it is your home ISP or the University or Work account where the IP address is registered. Your IP address could potentially be used in conjunction with other data to identify you.

If you are concerned about attempts to match your IP address to your identity, you may wish to use an anonymous browsing service or attempt some means to obfuscate your real IP address.

If so, you might like to try Tor, an anonymous browsing service.

8. Information security

We make no guarantee that the information that you provide us will be secure.


 
 
 
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