Publication statistics

Pub. period:1978-2011
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:20



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Thomas P. Moran:8
Patrick Chiu:6
Gordon Kurtenbach:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

William van Melle's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Thomas P. Moran:66
Andreas Girgensohn:46
Gordon Kurtenbach:45
 
 
 

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William van Melle

 

Publications by William van Melle (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Wiese, Jason, Biehl, Jacob T., Turner, Thea, Melle, William van and Girgensohn, Andreas (2011): Beyond 'yesterday's tomorrow': towards the design of awareness technologies for the contemporary worker. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 455-464. Available online

Modern office work practices increasingly breach traditional boundaries of time and place, increasing breakdowns workers encounter when coordinating interactions with colleagues. We conducted interviews with 12 workers and identified key problems introduced by these practices. To address these problems we developed myUnity, a fully functional platform enabling rich workplace awareness and coordination. myUnity is one of the first integrated platforms to span mobile and desktop environments, both in terms of access and sensing. It uses multiple sources to report user location, availability, tasks, and communication channels. A pilot field study of myUnity demonstrated the significant value of pervasive access to workplace awareness and communication facilities, as well as positive behavioral change in day-to-day communication practices for most users. We present resulting insights about the utility of awareness technology in flexible work environments.

© All rights reserved Wiese et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Saund, Eric, Melle, William van, Gujar, Anuj, Fishkin, Kenneth P. and Harrison, Beverly L. (1999): Design and Technology for Collaborage: Collaborative Collages of Information on Physical Walls. In: Zanden, Brad Vander and Marks, Joe (eds.) Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 07 - 10, 1999, Asheville, North Carolina, United States. pp. 197-206. Available online

A Collaborage is a collaborative collage of physically represented information on a surface that is connected with electronic information, such as a physical In/Out board connected to a people-locator database. The physical surface (board) contains items that are tracked by camera and computer vision technology. Events on the board trigger electronic services. This paper motivates this concept, presents three different applications, describes the system architecture and component technologies, and discusses several design issues.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Melle, William van and Chiu, Patrick (1998): Tailorable Domain Objects as Meeting Tools for an Electronic Whiteboard. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 295-304. Available online

Our goal is to provide tools to support working meetings on an electronic whiteboard, called Tivoli. This paper describes how we have integrated structured "domain objects" into the whiteboard environment. Domain objects represent the subject matter of meetings and can be exchanged between Tivoli and group databases. Domain objects can be tailored to produce meeting tools that are finely tuned to meeting practices. We describe the facility for tailoring and managing domain objects and the user interface techniques for blending these into the whiteboard environment. We show examples of both specific and generic meeting tools crafted from domain objects, and we describe a long-term case study in which these tools support an ongoing work process.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Moran, Thomas P., Melle, William van and Chiu, Patrick (1998): Spatial Interpretation of Domain Objects Integrated into a Freeform Electronic Whiteboard. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 175-184. Available online

Our goal is to provide tools to support working meetings on an electronic whiteboard, called Tivoli. This paper describes how we have integrated structured domain objects, which represent the subject matter of meetings, into the freeform whiteboard environment. Domain objects can be tailored to produce meeting tools that are finely tuned to meeting practices. We describe the language for defining domain objects and show examples of meeting tools that have been built with the language. We show that the system can interpret the spatial relationships of domain objects on the whiteboard to encode the meanings of the spatial arrangements, and we describe the computational mechanisms. We discuss some of the design principles for tailoring gestures for domain objects. Finally, we enumerate the techniques we have used to integrate the structured objects into the freeform whiteboard environment.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Palen, Leysia, Harrison, Steve, Chiu, Patrick, Kimberg, Daniel Y., Minneman, Scott, Melle, William van and Zellweger, Polle T. (1997): "I'll Get That Off the Audio": A Case Study of Salvaging Multimedia Meeting Records. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 202-209. Available online

We describe a case study of a complex, ongoing, collaborative work process, where the central activity is a series of meetings reviewing a wide range of subtle technical topics. The problem is the accurate reporting of the results of these meetings, which is the responsibility of a single person, who is not well-versed in all the topics. We provided tools to capture the meeting discussions and tools to "salvage" the captured multimedia recordings. Salvaging is a new kind of activity involving replaying, extracting, organizing, and writing. We observed a year of mature salvaging work in the case study. From this we describe the nature of salvage work (the constituent activities, the use of the workspace, the affordances of the audio medium, how practices develop and differentiate, how the content material affects practice). We also demonstrate how this work relates to the larger work processes (the task demands of the setting, the interplay of salvage with capture, the influence on the people being reported on and reported to). Salvaging tools are shown to be valuable for dealing with free-flowing discussions of complex subject matter and for producing high quality documentation.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Moran, Thomas P., Chiu, Patrick and Melle, William van (1997): Pen-Based Interaction Techniques for Organizing Material on an Electronic Whiteboard. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 45-54. Available online

This paper presents a scheme for extending an informal, pen-based whiteboard system (the Tivoli application on the Xerox LiveBoard) to provide interaction techniques that enable groups of users in informal meetings to easily organize and rearrange material and to manage the space on the board. The techniques are based on the direct manipulation of boundaries and the implicit recognition of regions. The techniques include operations for shrinking and rearranging, structured borders that tessellate the board, freeform enclosures that can be split, fused, and linked, and collapsible annotations. Experience with using these techniques, the results of a user test, some design trade-offs and lessons, and future directions are discussed.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Chiu, Patrick, Harrison, Steve, Kurtenbach, Gordon, Minneman, Scott and Melle, William van (1996): Evolutionary Engagement in an Ongoing Collaborative Work Process: A Case Study. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 150-159. Available online

We describe a case study in which experimental collaboration technologies was used for over two years in the real, ongoing work process of intellectual property management (IPM) at Xerox PARC. The technologies include LiveBoard-based meeting support tools, laptop notetaking tools, digital audio recording, and workstation tools to later access and replay the meeting activities. In cooperation with the IPM manager, both the work process and the tools were continuously evolved to improve the process. We supported and observed over 60 meetings, leading to a rich set of empirical observations of the meeting activities. We note some practical lessons for this research approach.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Moran, Thomas P., Chiu, Patrick, Melle, William van and Kurtenbach, Gordon (1995): Implicit Structures for Pen-Based Systems within a Freeform Interaction Paradigm. In: Katz, Irvin R., Mack, Robert L., Marks, Linn, Rosson, Mary Beth and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 95 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 7-11, 1995, Denver, Colorado. pp. 487-494. Available online

This paper presents a scheme for extending an informal, pen-based whiteboard system (Tivoli on the Xerox LiveBoard) to provide a structured editing capability without violating its free expression and ease of use. The scheme supports list, text, table, and outline structures over handwritten scribbles and typed text. The scheme is based on the system temporarily perceiving the "implicit structure" that humans see in the material, which is called a WYPIWYG (What You Perceive Is What You Get) capability. The design techniques, principles, trade-offs, and limitations of the scheme are discussed. A notion of "freeform interaction" is proposed to position the system with respect to current user interface techniques.

© All rights reserved Moran et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Minneman, Scott L., Harrison, Steve R., Janssen, Bill, Kurtenbach, Gordon, Moran, Thomas P., Smith, Ian E. and Melle, William van (1995): A Confederation of Tools for Capturing and Accessing Collaborative Activity. In: ACM Multimedia 1995 1995. pp. 523-534. Available online

1978
 
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Melle, William van (1978): MYCIN: A Knowledge-Based Consultation Program for Infectious Disease Diagnosis. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 10 (3) pp. 313-322.

MYCIN is a computer-based consultation system designed to assist physicians in the diagnosis of and therapy selection for patients with bacterial infections. In addition to the consultation system itself, MYCIN contains an explanation system which can answer simple English questions in order to justify its advice or educate the user. The system's knowledge is encoded in the form of some 350 production rules which embody the clinical decision criteria of infectious disease experts. Much of MYCIN's power derives from the modular, highly stylized nature of these decision rules, enabling the system to dissect its own reasoning and allowing easy modification of the knowledge base.

© All rights reserved Melle and/or Academic Press

 
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