Publication statistics

Pub. period:1985-2001
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Susan Dumais:3
Vania Joloboff:1
Mike Conner:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

William P. Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Susan Dumais:74
Gerhard Fischer:66
George G. Robertso..:61
 
 
 
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William P. Jones

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Publications by William P. Jones (bibliography)

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2001
 
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Jones, William P., Bruce, Harry and Dumais, Susan (2001): Keeping Found Things Found on the Web. In: Proceedings of the 2001 ACM CIKM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management November 5-10, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 119-126.

1990
 
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Jones, William P., Williams, Peter, Robertson, George G., Joloboff, Vania and Conner, Mike (1990): In Search of the Ideal Operating System for User Interfacing. In: Hudson, Scott E. (ed.) Proceedings of the 3rd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology October 03 - 05, 1990, Snowbird, Utah, United States. pp. 31-35.

1988
 
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Fischer, Gerhard, Weyer, Stephen A., Jones, William P., Kay, Alan C., Kintsch, Walter and Trigg, Randall H. (1988): A Critical Assessment of Hypertext Systems. In: Soloway, Elliot, Frye, Douglas and Sheppard, Sylvia B. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 88 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 15-19, 1988, Washington, DC, USA. pp. 223-227.

1987
 
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Jones, William P. (1987): How Do We Distinguish the Hyper from the Hype in Non-Linear Text?. In: Bullinger, Hans-Jorg and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 87 - 2nd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction September 1-4, 1987, Stuttgart, Germany. pp. 1107-1113.

The good news is that non-linear or hypertext systems may dramatically increase the accessibility of information. The bad news is that this increased accessibility may magnify further an already severe problem of selection. Whether we are sending or receiving a body of information, we must take steps to distinguish its components on the basis of their potential importance or relevance. Current hypertext efforts have focused on the development of tools giving users direct control over the formation and traversal of links connecting units of information in a network structure. Such tools place considerable power and a considerable burden in the hands of the users. Information must be initially organized in ways that prove useful later on; links leading to relevant information must subsequently be distinguished from a potentially large number of others. These activities may be very difficult to accomplish in an expanding knowledge base. In this article we look at potential selection in hypertext and we examine some of the ways in which these problems may be remedied.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or North-Holland

1986
 
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Jones, William P. (1986): The Memory Extender Personal Filing System. In: Mantei, Marilyn and Orbeton, Peter (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 86 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 13-17, 1986, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 298-305.

The benefits of electronic information storage are enormous and largely unrealized. As its cost continues to decline, the number of files in the average user's personal database may increase substantially. How is a user to keep track of several thousand, perhaps several hundred thousand, files? The Memory Extender (ME) system improves the user interface to a personal database by actively modeling the user's own memory for files and for the context in which these files are used. Files are multiply indexed through a network of variably weighted term links. Context is similarly represented and is used to minimize the user input necessary to disambiguate a file. Files are retrieved from the context through a spreading-activation-like process. The system aims towards an ideal in which the computer provides a natural extension to the user's own memory.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, William P. (1986): On the Applied Use of Human Memory Models: The Memory Extender Personal Filing System. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 25 (2) pp. 191-228.

The benefits of electronic information storage are enormous and largely unrealized. As its cost continues to decline, the number of files in the average user's personal database may increase substantially. How is a user to keep track of several thousand, perhaps several hundred thousand, files? The Memory Extender (ME) system improves the user interface to a personal database by actively modeling the user's own memory for files and for the context in which these files are used. The ME system is similar, in many respects, to current spreading activation, network models of human memory. Files are multiply indexed through a network of variably weighted term links. Context is similarly represented and is used to minimize the user input necessary to specify a file unambiguously -- either for purposes of storage or retrieval. Files are retrieved through a spreading-activation-like process. The system aims toward an ideal in which the computer provides a natural extension to the user's own memory.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or Academic Press

 
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Jones, William P. and Dumais, Susan (1986): The Spatial Metaphor for User Interfaces: Experimental Tests of Reference by Location versus Name. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 4 (1) pp. 42-63.

The enduring dichotomy between spatial and symbolic modes of representation and retrieval acquires an added pragmatic dimension through recent developments in computer-based information retrieval. The standard name-based approach to object reference is now supplemented on some systems by a spatial alternative-often driven by an office or desktop metaphor. Little rigorous evidence is available, however, to support the supposition that spatial memory in itself is more effective than symbolic memory. The accuracy of spatial versus symbolic reference was assessed in three experiments. In Experiment 1 accuracy of location reference in a location-only filing condition was initially comparable to that in a name-only condition, but deteriorated much more rapidly with increases in the number of objects filled. In Experiment 2 subjects placed objects in a two-dimensional space containing landmarks (drawings of a desk, table, filing cabinets, etc.) designed to evoke an office metaphor, and in Experiment 3 subjects placed objects in an actual, three-dimensional mock office. Neither of these enhancements served to improve significantly the accuracy of location reference, and performance remained below that of a name-only condition in Experiment 1. The results raise questions about the utility of spatial metaphor over symbolic filing and highlight the need for continuing research in which considerations of technological and economic feasibility are balanced by considerations of psychological utility.

© All rights reserved Jones and Dumais and/or ACM Press

1985
 
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Dumais, Susan and Jones, William P. (1985): A Comparison of Symbolic and Spatial Filing. In: Borman, Lorraine and Curtis, Bill (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 85 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1985, San Francisco, California. pp. 127-130.

The traditional and still dominant form of object reference in computing systems is symbolic - data files, programs, etc. are initially labeled and subsequently referred to by name. This approach is being supplemented on some systems by a spatial alternative which is often driven by an office or desktop metaphor (e.g. Apple's Lisa and Macintosh systems, or Bolt's 1979 Spatial Data Management System). In such systems, an object is placed in a simulated two- or three-dimensional space, and can later be retrieved by pointing to its location. In order to begin to understand the relative merits of spatial and symbolic filing schemes for representing and organizing information, we compared four ways of filing computer objects. We found location information to be of limited utility, either by itself or in combination with symbolic information. This calls into question the generality and efficacy of the desktop metaphor for information retrieval.

© All rights reserved Dumais and and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, William P. and Landauer, Thomas K. (1985): Context and Self-Selection Effects in Name Learning. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 4 (1) pp. 3-17.

In laboratory learning tasks, people's spontaneously chosen responses to stimuli have been found to be more memorable than equivalent responses chosen by someone else. In a computing situation, this suggests that it might be desirable to let new users select their own names for commands. However, it can also be argued that new users cannot name a command effectively, because they lack sufficient knowledge concerning the overall structure of the command set and its referents. Since existing psychological research has little to say about the relationship between contextual or structural knowledge and selection mode (self versus other), these factors were crossed in an experiment where subjects learned names for different objects (personnel data categories and descriptions of text-edit operations). In subsequent recall tests, beneficial effects were observed both for context knowledge and for the self-selection of names. Several interactions involving these factors were also significant. For personnel data categories, the context manipulation had no effect on performance when subjects were allowed to select their own names, but helped if they had to learn assignments made by others. For the less familiar text-editing descriptions, context information helped performance in general and considerably enhanced the benefits of self-selection.

© All rights reserved Jones and and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Changes to this page (author)

29 May 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/william_p__jones.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1985-2001
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:12



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Susan Dumais:3
Vania Joloboff:1
Mike Conner:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

William P. Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Susan Dumais:74
Gerhard Fischer:66
George G. Robertso..:61
 
 
 
Jul 11

Creative without strategy is called ‘art‘. Creative with strategy is called ‘advertising‘

-- Jef I. Richards

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!