Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2007
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:14



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Stephen J. Boies:5
John D. Gould:4
Sharon L. Greene:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

William Bennett's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Thomas Erickson:53
Wendy A. Kellogg:34
John D. Gould:27
 
 
 

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William Bennett

Has also published under the name of:
"William E. Bennett" and "W. Bennett"

 

Publications by William Bennett (bibliography)

 what's this?
2007
 
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Ding, Xianghua, Erickson, Thomas, Kellogg, Wendy A., Levy, Stephen, Christensen, James E., Sussman, Jeremy, Wolf, Tracee Vetting and Bennett, William (2007): An empirical study of the use of visually enhanced voip audio conferencing: the case of IEAC. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1019-1028. Available online

IBM Enhanced Audio Conferencing (IEAC) is a VoIP-based audio conferencing system that, like several other systems, provides a visualization showing who is present and their states (e.g., speaking, muted). This paper presents the first study of the use of such a system. Drawing on log files collected over six weeks of use by over 1300 corporate employees, and interviews with 10 of them, we look at how and why various features of the system are used and what sorts of practices are supported. Our findings shed light on the factors that drive the use of visual enhancements to audio conferencing, and suggest further research topics.

© All rights reserved Ding et al. and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Kellogg, Wendy A., Erickson, Thomas, Wolf, Tracee Vetting, Levy, Stephen, Christensen, Jim, Sussman, Jeremy and Bennett, William (2006): Leveraging digital backchannels to enhance user experience in electronically mediated communication. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 451-454. Available online

Rendezvous is a conference call solution that leverages Voice over IP, enterprise calendaring, instant messaging, and rich client functionality to enhance the user experience and effectiveness of distributed meetings. We describe the service, and two of its user experience innovations -- the conference call proxy and iHelp -- which function as digital backchannels. We present results from a preliminary user evaluation, and discuss our notion of digital backchannels with respect to the social translucence framework.

© All rights reserved Kellogg et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
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Andre, T. S. and Bennett, William (2001): Applying Flight Simulation and Rehearsal Concepts to Enhance Aerospace Warfighting Effectiveness. In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2001. pp. 854-858.

1990
 
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Wiecha, Charles, Bennett, William, Boies, Stephen J., Gould, John A. and Greene, Sharon L. (1990): ITS: A Tool for Rapidly Developing Interactive Applications. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 8 (3) pp. 204-236.

The ITS architecture separates applications into four layers. The action layer implements back-end application functions. The dialog layer defines the content of the user interface, independent of its style. Content specifies the objects included in each frame of the interface, the flow of control among frames, and what actions are associated with each object. The style rule layer defines the presentation and behavior of a family of interaction techniques. Finally, the style program layer implements primitive toolkit objects that are composed by the rule layer into complete interaction techniques. This paper describes the architecture in detail, compares it with previous User Interface Management Systems and toolkits, and describes how ITS is being used to implement the visitor information system for EXPO'92.

© All rights reserved Wiecha et al. and/or ACM Press

1989
 
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Wiecha, Charles, Bennett, William, Boies, Stephen J. and Gould, John D. (1989): Generating Highly Interactive User Interfaces. In: Bice, Ken and Lewis, Clayton H. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 89 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 30 - June 4, 1989, Austin, Texas. pp. 277-282.

 
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Bennett, William, Boies, Stephen J., Gould, John D., Greene, Sharon L. and Wiecha, Charles (1989): Transformations on a Dialog Tree: Rule-Based Mapping of Content to Style. In: Sibert, John L. (ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology November 13 - 15, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. pp. 67-75.

 
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Gould, John D., Boies, Stephen J., Greene, Sharon L. and Bennett, William (1989): ITS: A New Method for Computer Application Development and Prototyping. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 33rd Annual Meeting 1989. pp. 245-248.

Perhaps the one thing that user interface designers most want is tools that will help them (a) quickly visualize their work; (b) carry it out more efficiently and faster; and (c) do iterative design; and (d) allow them to do more work without the need of programmers. An on-going research project (called ITS) is responding to these challenges by developing software tools for user interface and application development, together with providing a run-time environment for application execution. There are four key concepts. First, ITS separates the style of an application from the content of an application. Human-computer interface styles are general, rule-based, under parameter control, and designed to handle a variety of applications. Second, ITS envisions four general work roles in application design and development: content experts, content programmers, style experts, and style programmers. Third, end users do four operations: make choices, fill in forms, manipulate lists, and read information blocks. Fourth, ITS aims at creating software tools for each work role.

© All rights reserved Gould et al. and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Boies, Stephen J., Gould, John D., Greene, Sharon L. and Bennett, William (1989): Demonstration of ITS -- A Rapid Application Development System for User Interfaces. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 33rd Annual Meeting 1989. p. 1142.

This note is in connection with a live demonstration of ITS. ITS is aimed at providing fast prototyping of user interfaces in new computer applications (within a few hours of when a designer begins work); greatly reducing the workload in designing, implementing, testing computer applications; insuring excellent, consistent, well-tested interface styles. ITS is a new, comprehensive approach to application development (see in this proceedings Gould, Boies, Bennett, and Green for references). ITS provides software tools for user interface and application development, and a run-time environment for application execution. There are four key concepts. First, ITS separates the style of an application from the content of an application.... Second, ITS envisions four general work roles in application design and development: application (content) experts, application (content) programmers, style experts, and style programmers.... Third, our informal analysis of computer applications indicates that end users do four operations: make choices, fill in forms, manipulate lists, and read information blocks. All information that flows across the user interface can be thought of in terms of these four operations.... Fourth, ITS aims at creating software tools for each role.... If successful, ITS will: (a) Reduce the main source of errors in application development today, namely poor customer-programmer communication, by allowing content experts to become implementers (not just interviewees). (b) Reduce the risks and major resistance in carrying out interface design today. Separating user interface style and user interface content allows each to be tested independently without unforeseen, dangerous side-effects. (c) Speed up application development through code re-use and productivity enhancing tools. (d) Relieve severe skill shortages of outstanding programmers and not enough usability people. The best work will be leveraged. (e) Provide a framework for formulating human factors work and insuring that it has impact. In contrast to user interface guidelines, which are instantiated in a book, ITS results are instantiated in a computer-based toolkit.

© All rights reserved Boies et al. and/or Human Factors Society

 
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