Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2003
Pub. count:13
Number of co-authors:15



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Loren Terveen:11
Brian Amento:6
Deborah Hix:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Will Hill's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Loren Terveen:69
Steve Whittaker:68
James D. Hollan:49
 
 
 
Jul 10

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-- Bob Baxley, 2003

 
 

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Will Hill

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Publications by Will Hill (bibliography)

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2003
 
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Amento, Brian, Terveen, Loren, Hill, Will, Hix, Deborah and Schulman, Robert S. (2003): Experiments in social data mining: The TopicShop system. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 10 (1) pp. 54-85.

Social data mining systems enable people to share opinions and benefit from each other's experience. They do this by mining and redistributing information from computational records of social activity such as Usenet messages, system usage history, citations, or hyperlinks. Some general questions for evaluating such systems are: (1) is the extracted information valuable? and (2) do interfaces based on the information improve user task performance? We report here on TopicShop, a system that mines information from the structure and content of Web pages and provides an exploratory information workspace interface. We carried out experiments that yielded positive answers to both evaluation questions. First, a number of automatically computable features about Web sites do a good job of predicting expert quality judgments about sites. Second, compared to popular Web search interfaces, the TopicShop interface to this information lets users select significantly more high-quality sites, in less time and with less effort, and to organize the sites they select into personally meaningful collections more quickly and easily. We conclude by discussing how our results may be applied and considering how they touch on general issues concerning quality, expertise, and consensus.

© All rights reserved Amento et al. and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Terveen, Loren, McMackin, Jessica, Amento, Brian and Hill, Will (2002): Specifying preferences based on user history. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 315-322.

2000
 
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Amento, Brian, Terveen, Loren, Hill, Will and Hix, Deborah (2000): TopicShop: Enhanced Support for Evaluating and Organizing Collections of Web Sites. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 201-209.

 
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Amento, Brian, Terveen, Loren and Hill, Will (2000): Does "Authority" Mean Quality? Predicting Expert Quality Ratings of Web Documents. In: Proceedings of the 23rd Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2000. pp. 296-303.

1999
 
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Amento, Brian, Hill, Will, Terveen, Loren, Ju, Peter and Hix, Deborah (1999): An Empirical Evaluation of User Interfaces for Topic Management of Web Sites. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 552-559.

Topic management is the task of gathering, evaluating, organizing, and sharing a set of web sites for a specific topic. Current web tools do not provide adequate support for this task. We created the TopicShop system to address this need. TopicShop includes (1) a webcrawler that discovers relevant web sites and builds site profiles, and (2) user interfaces for exploring and organizing sites. We conducted an empirical study comparing user performance with TopicShop vs. Yahoo. TopicShop subjects found over 80% more high-quality sites (where quality was determined by independent expert judgements) while browsing only 81% as many sites and completing their task in 89% of the time. The site profile data that TopicShop provides -- in particular, the number of pages on a site and the number of other sites that link to it -- was the key to these results, as users exploited it to identify the most promising sites quickly and easily.

© All rights reserved Amento et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Terveen, Loren, Hill, Will and Amento, Brian (1999): Constructing, Organizing, and Visualizing Collections of Topically Related Web Resources. In ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR), 6 (1) pp. 67-94.

For many purposes, the Web page is too small a unit of interaction and analysis. Web sites are structured multimedia documents consisting of many pages, and users often are interested in obtaining and evaluating entire collections of topically related sites. Once such a collection is obtained, users face the challenge of exploring, comprehending, and organizing the items. We report four innovations that address these user needs: (1) we replaced the Web page with the Web site as the basic unit of interaction and analysis; (2) we defined a new information structure, the clan graph, that groups together sets of related sites; (3) we augment the representation of a site with a site profile, information about site structure and content that helps inform user evaluation of a site; and (4) we invented a new graph visualization, the auditorium visualization, that reveals important structural and content properties of sites within a clan graph. Detailed analysis and user studies document the utility of this approach. The clan graph construction algorithm tends to filter out irrelevant sites and discover additional relevant items. The auditorium visualization, augmented with drill-down capabilities to explore site profile data, helps users to find high-quality sites as well as sites that serve a particular function.

© All rights reserved Terveen et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Terveen, Loren and Hill, Will (1998): Finding and Visualizing Inter-Site Clan Graphs. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, JoŽlle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 448-455.

For many purposes, the Web page is too small a unit of interaction. Users often want to interact with larger-scale entities, particularly collections of topically related items. We report three innovations that address this user need. * We replaced the web page with the web site as the basic unit of interaction and analysis. * We defined a new information structure, the clan graph, that groups together sets of related sites. * We invented a new graph visualization, the auditorium visualization, that reveals important structural and content properties of sites within a clan graph. We have discovered interesting information that can be extracted from the structure of a clan graph. We can identify structurally important sites with many incoming or outgoing links. Links between sites serve important functions: they often identify "front door" pages of sites, sometimes identify especially significant pages within a site, and occasionally contain informative anchor text.

© All rights reserved Terveen and Hill and/or ACM Press

 
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Whittaker, Steve, Terveen, Loren, Hill, Will and Cherny, Lynn (1998): The Dynamics of Mass Interaction. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 257-264.

Usenet may be regarded as the world's largest conversational application, with over 17,000 newsgroups and 3 million users. Despite its ubiquity and popularity, however, we know little about the nature of the interactions it supports. This empirical paper investigates mass interaction in Usenet. We analyse over 2.15 million messages from 659,450 posters, collected from 500 newsgroups over 6 months. We first characterise mass interaction, presenting basic data about demographics, conversational strategies and interactivity. Using predictions from the common ground model of interaction, we next conduct causal modelling to determine relations between demographics, conversational strategies and interactivity. We find evidence for moderate conversational threading, but large participation inequalities in Usenet, with a small minority of participants posting a large proportion of messages. Contrary to the common ground model and "Netiquette" guidelines, we also find that "cross-posting" to external newsgroups is highly frequent. Our predictions about the effects of demographics on conversational strategy were largely confirmed, but we found disconfirming evidence about the relations between conversational strategy and interactivity. Contrary to our expectations, both cross-posting and short messages promote interactivity. We conclude that in order to explain mass interaction, the common ground model must be modified to incorporate notions of weak ties and communication overload.

© All rights reserved Whittaker et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Terveen, Loren and Hill, Will (1998): Evaluating Emergent Collaboration on the Web. In: Poltrock, Steven and Grudin, Jonathan (eds.) Proceedings of the 1998 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 14 - 18, 1998, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 355-362.

Links between web sites can be seen as evidence of a type of emergent collaboration among web site authors. We report here on an empirical investigation into emergent collaboration. We developed a webcrawling algorithm and tested its performance on topics volunteered by 30 subjects. Our findings include: * Some topics exhibit emergent collaboration, some do not. The presence of commercial sites reduces collaboration. * When sites are linked with other sites, they tend to group into one large, tightly connected component. * Connectivity can serve as the basis for collaborative filtering. Human experts rate connected sites as significantly more relevant and of higher quality.

© All rights reserved Terveen and Hill and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Hill, Will and Terveen, Loren (1996): Using Frequency-of-Mention in Public Conversations for Social Filtering. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 106-112.

We report on an investigation of using Usenet newsgroups for social filtering of Web resources. Our main empirical results are: (1) for the period of May '96 to Jul '96, about 23% of Usenet news messages mention Web resources, (2) 19% of resource mentions are recommendations (as opposed, e.g., to home pages), (3) we can automatically recognize recommendations with at least 90% accuracy, and (4) in some newsgroups, certain resources are mentioned significantly more frequently than others and thus appear to play a central role for that community. We have created a Web site that summarizes the most frequently and recently mentioned Web resources for 1400 newsgroups.

© All rights reserved Hill and Terveen and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Hill, Will, Stead, Larry, Rosenstein, Mark and Furnas, George W. (1995): Recommending and Evaluating Choices in a Virtual Community of Use. In: Katz, Irvin R., Mack, Robert L., Marks, Linn, Rosson, Mary Beth and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 95 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 7-11, 1995, Denver, Colorado. pp. 194-201.

When making a choice in the absence of decisive first-hand knowledge, choosing as other like-minded, similarly-situated people have successfully chosen in the past is a good strategy -- in effect, using other people as filters and guides: filters to strain out potentially bad choices and guides to point out potentially good choices. Current human-computer interfaces largely ignore the power of the social strategy. For most choices within an interface, new users are left to fend for themselves and if necessary, to pursue help outside of the interface. We present a general his tory-of-use method that automates a social method for informing choice and report on how it fares in the context of a fielded test case: the selection of videos from a large set. The positive results show that communal history-of-use data can serve as a powerful resource for use in interfaces.

© All rights reserved Hill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Terveen, Loren, Stolze, Markus and Hill, Will (1995): From "Model World" to "Magic World". In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 27 (4) pp. 31-34.

1992
 
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Hill, Will, Hollan, James D., Wroblewski, Dave and McCandless, Tim (1992): Edit Wear and Read Wear. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 3-9.

We describe two applications that illustrate the idea of computational wear in the domain of document processing. By graphically depicting the history of author and reader interactions with documents, these applications offer otherwise unavailable information to guide work. We discuss how their design accords with a theory of professional work and an informational physics perspective on interface design.

© All rights reserved Hill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

24 Jun 2007: Modified
24 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/will_hill.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2003
Pub. count:13
Number of co-authors:15



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Loren Terveen:11
Brian Amento:6
Deborah Hix:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Will Hill's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Loren Terveen:69
Steve Whittaker:68
James D. Hollan:49
 
 
 
Jul 10

Visual appearance is one of the most effective variables for quickly differentiating one application from another

-- Bob Baxley, 2003

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!