Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:34
Number of co-authors:76



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Henriette S. M. Cramer:7
Bob J. Wielinga:4
Alia Amin:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Vanessa Evers's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Manfred Tscheligi:105
Clifford Nass:70
Volker Wulf:55
 
 
 

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Vanessa Evers

Personal Homepage:
http://vanessaevers.wordpress.com/

 

Publications by Vanessa Evers (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Tscheligi, Manfred, Meschtscherjakov, Alexander, Weiss, Astrid, Wulf, Volker, Evers, Vanessa and Mutlu, Bilge (2012): Exploring collaboration in challenging environments: from the car to the factory and beyond. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 15-16. Available online

We propose a daylong workshop at CSCW2012 on the topic collaboration in challenging and difficult environments, which are to our understanding all contexts, which go beyond traditional working/office settings topic. Examples for these environments can be the automotive context or the context of a semiconductor factory, which show very specific contextual conditions and therefore offer special research challenges: How to address all passengers in the car, not only the driver? How to explore operator tasks in a cleanroom? How could the long-term (social) collaboration of robots and humans be investigated in privacy critical environments?

© All rights reserved Tscheligi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sardar, Aziez, Joosse, Michiel, Weiss, Astrid and Evers, Vanessa (2012): Don't stand so close to me: users' attitudinal and behavioral responses to personal space invasion by robots. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2012. pp. 229-230. Available online

When in a human environment, one might expect that a social robot would act according to the social norms people expect of each other. When someone does not adhere to a prevalent social norm, people usually feel threatened and disturbed. Thus, insight is needed into what is perceived as socially normative behavior for robots. We conducted an experiment in which an agent approached a participant in order to determine the effect of personal space invasion. We manipulated the agent-type (human/robot) and the approach speed (slow/fast) of the agent towards the participant. Unexpectedly, our results show that the participants displayed more compensatory behavior in the robot condition than in the human condition. We consider this response toward personal space invasion as indication that people react in a similar way to robots as they do to humans, however with more intensity.

© All rights reserved Sardar et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weiss, Astrid, Dijk, Betsy van and Evers, Vanessa (2012): Knowing me knowing you: exploring effects of culture and context on perception of robot personality. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Intercultural Collaboration 2012. pp. 133-136. Available online

We carry out a set of experiments to assess collaboration between human users and robots in a cross-cultural setting. This paper describes the study design and deployment of a video-based study to investigate task-dependence and cultural-background dependence of the personality trait attribution on a socially interactive robot. In Human-Robot Interaction, as well as in Human-Agent Interaction research, the attribution of personality traits towards intelligent agents has already been researched intensively in terms of the social similarity or complementary rule. We assume that searching the explanation for personality trait attribution in the similarity and complementary rule does not take into account important contextual factors. Just like people equate certain personality types to certain professions, we expect that people may have certain personality expectations depending on the context of the task the robot carries out. Because professions have different social meaning in different national culture, we also expect that these task-dependent personality preferences differ across cultures. Therefore, we suggest an experiment that considers the task-context and the cultural-background of users.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Winterboer, Andi, Martens, Merijn A., Pavlin, Gregor, Groen, Frans C. A. and Evers, Vanessa (2011): DIADEM: a system for collaborative environmental monitoring. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 589-590. Available online

Environmental monitoring and emergency response projects in urban-industrial areas increasingly rely on efficient collaboration between experts in control rooms and at incident locations, and citizens who live or work in the area. In the video accompanying this abstract we present a system that uses distributed sensor technology, Bayesian decision tools, and advanced map-based interfaces to facilitate collaboration between environmental experts and the public for environmental monitoring and early detection of chemical incidents.

© All rights reserved Winterboer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Bouwer, Anders, Nack, Frank and Evers, Vanessa (2011): Towards support for collaborative navigation in complex indoor environments. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 601-604. Available online

In this paper we present first results of an observation study on indoor navigation behaviour of visitors at a large public fair. As an outcome we present a number of requirements for mobile indoor navigation systems that support collaborative destination and path finding tasks.

© All rights reserved Bouwer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Evers, Vanessa, Vries, Roelof de and Alvito, Paulo (2011): Designing interruptive behaviors of a public environmental monitoring robot. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2011. pp. 131-132. Available online

This paper reports ongoing research to inform the design of a social robot to monitor levels of pollutant gasses in the air. Next to licensed environmental agents and immobile chemical sensors, mobile technologies such as robotic agents are needed to collect complaints and smell descriptions from humans in urban industrial areas. These robots will interact with members of the public and ensure responsiveness and accuracy of responses. For robots to be accepted as representative environmental monitoring agents and for people to comply with robot instructions in the case of a calamity, social skills will be important. In this paper we will describe the intelligent environment the environmental robot is part of and discuss preliminary work to understand in what way robot interruptions can be mitigated with help of social robot behaviors.

© All rights reserved Evers et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Smid, Henricus, Mast, Patrick, Tromp, Maarten, Winterboer, Andi and Evers, Vanessa (2011): Canary in a coal mine: monitoring air quality and detecting environmental incidents by harvesting Twitter. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1855-1860. Available online

We present an application that facilitates environmental monitoring by and for the general public. 'Canary in a Coal Mine' (CIACM) gathers and analyses pollution-related tweets in real-time from the micro-blogging platform Twitter and visualizes temporal and spatial characteristics of the data. CIACM allows citizens to keep track of the environmental quality of their region and empowers users to contribute to this public environmental monitoring system.

© All rights reserved Smid et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mutlu, Bilge, Bartneck, Christoph, Ham, Jaap, Evers, Vanessa and Kanda, Takayuki (2011): Social Robotics Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Berlin, Germany,

2010
 
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Cramer, Henriette, Evers, Vanessa, Slooten, Tim van, Ghijsen, Mattijs and Wielinga, Bob (2010): Trying too hard: effects of mobile agents' (Inappropriate) social expressiveness on trust, affect and compliance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1471-1474. Available online

Mobile services can provide users with information relevant to their current circumstances. Distant services in turn can acquire local information from people in an area of interest. Socially expressive agent behaviour has been suggested as a way to build reciprocal relationships and to increase user response to such requests. This between-subject, Wizard-of-Oz experiment aimed to investigate the potential of such behaviours. 44 participants performed a search task in an urgent context while being interrupted by a mobile agent that both provided and requested information. The socially expressive behaviour shown in this study did not increase compliance to requests; it instead reduced trust in provided information and compliance to warnings. It also negatively impacted the affective experience of users scoring lower on empathy as a personality trait. Inappropriate social expressiveness can have serious consequences; we here elaborate on the reasons for our negative results.

© All rights reserved Cramer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cramer, Henriette, Goddijn, Jorrit, Wielinga, Bob and Evers, Vanessa (2010): Effects of (in)accurate empathy and situational valence on attitudes towards robots. In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2010. pp. 141-142. Available online

Empathy has great potential in human-robot interaction. However, the challenging nature of assessing the user's emotional state points to the importance of also understanding the effects of empathic behaviours incongruent with users' affective experience. A 3x2 between-subject video-based survey experiment (N=133) was conducted with empathic robot behaviour (empathically accurate, neutral, inaccurate) and valence of the situation (positive, negative) as dimensions. Trust decreased when empathic responses were incongruent with the affective state of the user. However, in the negative valence condition, reported perceived empathic abilities were greater when the robot responded as if the situation were positive.

© All rights reserved Cramer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Wang, Lin, Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick, Evers, Vanessa, Robinson, Benjamin Krisper and Hinds, Pamela (2010): When in Rome: the role of culture & context in adherence to robot recommendations. In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2010. pp. 359-366. Available online

In this study, we sought to clarify the effects of users' cultural background and cultural context on human-robot team collaboration by investigating attitudes toward and the extent to which people changed their decisions based on the recommendations of a robot collaborator. We report the results of a 22 experiment with nationality (Chinese vs. US) and communication style (implicit vs. explicit) as dimensions. The results confirm expectations that when robots behave in more culturally normative ways, subjects are more likely to heed their recommendations. Specifically, subjects with a Chinese vs. a US cultural background changed their decisions more when collaborating with robots that communicated implicitly vs. explicitly. We also found evidence that Chinese subjects were more negative in their attitude to robots and, as a result, relied less on the robot's advice. These findings suggest that cultural values affect responses to robots in collaborative situations and reinforce the importance of culturally sensitive design in HRI.

© All rights reserved Wang et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Heerink, Marcel, Krose, Ben J. A., Evers, Vanessa and Wielinga, Bob J. (2010): Relating conversational expressiveness to social presence and acceptance of an assistive social robot. In Virtual Reality, 14 (1) pp. 77-84. Available online

 
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Evers, Vanessa and Krose, Ben (2010): Toward an ambient empathic health companion for self care in the intelligent home. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Annual European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2010. pp. 365-366. Available online

Motivation -- This paper describes our work in progress to develop a personal monitoring system that can monitor the physical and emotional condition of a patient by using contextual information from a sensor network, provide the patient with feedback concerning their health status and motivate the patient to adopt behavior with a positive health impact (such as exercising or taking medication at the right moment). Research approach -- We will extend the capabilities of an existing robotic health buddy with a (DBN based) sensor network. Then we will carry out a series of controlled, long-term field experiments where we identify and evaluate the effects of various agent social communicative behaviours on the user's adoption of health improving lifestyle patterns. Findings/Design -- The findings of the experiments will inform the final design of the health buddy and it's behaviours. We will also realise system adaptivity of the data processing and data fusion methods as well as the health buddy adaptivity to the user's emotional state. Research limitations/Implications -- The project will limit itself to monitoring and motivating people who suffer from cardiovascular chronic conditions and to the home environment. Originality/Value -- The research makes a contribution to the needs of health monitoring for a specific user group. The health buddy will use social behaviours to motivate users over a long-term time period. Take away message -- Home health monitoring and self care can be more enjoyable and easier through motivating smart health buddies.

© All rights reserved Evers and Krose and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Cramer, Henriette S. M., Evers, Vanessa, Someren, Maarten W. Van and Wielinga, Bob J. (2009): Awareness, training and trust in interaction with adaptive spam filters. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 909-912. Available online

Even though adaptive (trainable) spam filters are a common example of systems that make (semi-)autonomous decisions on behalf of the user, trust in these filters has been underexplored. This paper reports a study of usage of spam filters in the daily workplace and user behaviour in training these filters (N=43). User observation, interview and survey techniques were applied to investigate attitudes towards two types of filters: a user-adaptive (trainable) and a rule-based filter. While many of our participants invested extensive effort in training their filters, training did not influence filter trust. Instead, the findings indicate that users' filter awareness and understanding seriously impacts attitudes and behaviour. Specific examples of difficulties related to awareness of filter activity and adaptivity are described showing concerns relevant to all adaptive and (semi-)autonomous systems that rely on explicit user feedback.

© All rights reserved Cramer et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sukumaran, Abhay, Ramlal, Satyan, Ophir, Eyal, Kumar, Vangala RamNaresh, Mishra, Gaurav, Evers, Vanessa, Balaji, Venkataraman and Nass, Clifford (2009): Intermediated technology interaction in rural contexts. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3817-3822. Available online

Access to information technology in developing countries is often indirect, involving human intermediaries. A computer kiosk is a typical instance of three-way interaction between user, kiosk operator, and kiosk technology. We describe a pilot experimental study that investigates whether manipulating the social prominence of the intermediary versus the technology affects perceived information characteristics and attitudes toward the interaction. We suggest that a better understanding of such locally specific interaction models is needed to address culturally influenced issues in information technology use throughout the developing world. Ongoing methodological challenges in conducting experimental studies in such contexts are discussed.

© All rights reserved Sukumaran et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wang, Lin, Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick, Evers, Vanessa, Robinson, Benjamin and Hinds, Pamela (2009): Responsiveness to robots: effects of ingroup orientation & communication style on hri in china. In: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2009. pp. 247-248. Available online

This study investigates the effects of group orientation and communication style on Chinese subjects' responsiveness to robots. A 2x2 experiment was conducted with group orientation (ingroup vs. outgroup) and communication style (implicit vs. explicit) as dimensions. The results confirm expectations that subjects with a Chinese cultural background are more responsive to robots that use implicit communication styles. We also found some evidence that subjects were more responsive when they thought of the robot as an ingroup member. These findings inform the design of robots for use in China and countries with similar cultural values and reinforce the importance of culturally sensitive design in HRI.

© All rights reserved Wang et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cramer, Henriette S. M., Kemper, Nicander A., Amin, Alia and Evers, Vanessa (2009): The effects of robot touch and proactive behaviour on perceptions of human-robot interactions. In: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2009. pp. 275-276. Available online

Despite robots' embodiment, the effect of physical contact or touch and its interaction with robots' autonomous behaviour has been a mostly overlooked aspect of human-robot interaction. This video-based, 2x2 between-subject survey experiment (N=119) found that touch and proactiveness interacted in their effects on perceived machine-likeness and dependability. Attitude towards robots in general also interacted with the effects of touch. Results show the value of further exploring the combination of physical aspects of human-robot interaction and proactiveness.

© All rights reserved Cramer et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Winterboer, Andi, Cramer, Henriette S. M., Pavlin, Gregor, Groen, Frans C. A. and Evers, Vanessa (2009): 'Do you smell rotten eggs?': evaluating interactions with mobile agents in crisis response situations. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 89. Available online

In this paper, we present ongoing research concerning the interaction between users and autonomous mobile agents in the environmental monitoring domain. The overarching project, DIADEM, deals with developing a system that detects potentially hazardous situations in populated industrial areas using input from both a distributed sensor network and humans through mobile devices. We propose a model of interaction with the gas detection system where concerned citizens communicate with a mobile agent to inform the gas monitoring system about unusual smells via their mobile phones. Next, we present a preliminary user requirements analysis based on 40 phone calls from members of the public to an environmental monitoring agency. Finally, we introduce measures to study the delicate long-term social relationship between users and the gas monitoring system.

© All rights reserved Winterboer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Heerink, Marcel, Krose, Ben, Wielinga, Bob and Evers, Vanessa (2009): Measuring the influence of social abilities on acceptance of an interface robot and a screen agent by elderly users. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 430-439. Available online

Personal robots and screen agents can be equipped with social abilities to facilitate interaction. This paper describes our research on the influence of these abilities on elderly user's acceptance of such a system. Experiments were set up in eldercare institutions where a robotic and screen agent with simulated conversational capabilities were used in a Wizard of Oz experiment. Both agents were used with two conditions: a more socially communicative (the agent made use of a larger set of social abilities in interaction) and a less socially communicative interface. Results show that participants who were confronted with the more socially communicative version of the robotic agent felt more comfortable and were more expressive in communicating with it. This suggests that the more socially communicative condition would be more likely to be accepted as a conversational partner. This effect was less strong however, with the screen agent, suggesting that embodiment plays a role in this. Furthermore, results did show a correlation between social abilities as perceived by participants and some aspects of technology acceptance for both systems, but this did not relate to the more and less socially communicative conditions. Evaluating the experiments and specifically the use of our acceptance model we suggest that this particular context of robotic and screen agents for elderly users requires the development of a more appropriate acceptance model which not only features technology acceptance, but also conversational acceptance.

© All rights reserved Heerink et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Zhang, Junte, Amin, Alia, Cramer, Henriette S. M., Evers, Vanessa and Hardman, Lynda (2009): Improving user confidence in cultural heritage aggregated results. In: Proceedings of the 32nd Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2009. pp. 702-703. Available online

State of the art web search systems enable aggregation of information from many sources. Users are challenged to assess the reliability of information from different sources. We report on an empirical user study on the effect of displaying credibility ratings of multiple cultural heritage sources (e.g. museum websites, art blogs) on users' search performance and selection. The results of our online interactive study (N=122) show that when explicitly presenting these ratings, people become significantly more confident in their selection of information from aggregated results.

© All rights reserved Zhang et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cramer, Henriette S. M., Kemper, Nicander A., Amin, Alia, Wielinga, Bob J. and Evers, Vanessa (2009): 'Give me a hug': the effects of touch and autonomy on people's responses to embodied social agents. In Journal of Visualization and Computer Animation, 20 (2) pp. 437-445. Available online

 
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Amin, Alia, Hildebrand, Michiel, Ossenbruggen, Jacco van, Evers, Vanessa and Hardman, Lynda (2009): Organizing Suggestions in Autocompletion Interfaces. In: Boughanem, Mohand, Berrut, Catherine, Mothe, Josiane and Soul-Dupuy, Chantal (eds.) Advances in Information Retrieval - 31th European Conference on IR Research - ECIR 2009 April 6-9, 2009, 2009, Toulouse, France. pp. 521-529. Available online

2008
 
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Heerink, Marcel, Krose, Ben, Wielinga, Bob and Evers, Vanessa (2008): Enjoyment intention to use and actual use of a conversational robot by elderly people. In: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2008. pp. 113-120. Available online

In this paper we explore the concept of enjoyment as a possible factor influencing acceptance of robotic technology by elderly people. We describe an experiment with a conversational robot and elderly users (n=30) that incorporates both a test session and a long term user observation. The experiment did confirm the hypothesis that perceived enjoyment has an effect on the intention to use a robotic system. Furthermore, findings show that the general assumption in technology acceptance models that intention to use predicts actual use is also applicable to this specific technology used by elderly people.

© All rights reserved Heerink et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Evers, Vanessa, Maldonado, Heidy C., Brodecki, Talia L. and Hinds, Pamela J. (2008): Relational vs. group self-construal: untangling the role of national culture in HRI. In: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2008. pp. 255-262. Available online

As robots (and other technologies) increasingly make decisions on behalf of people, it is important to understand how people from diverse cultures respond to this capability. Thus far, much design of autonomous systems takes a Western view valuing individual preferences and choice. We challenge the assumption that Western values are universally optimal for robots. In this study, we sought to clarify the effects of users' cultural background on human-robot collaboration by investigating their attitudes toward and the extent to which people accepted choices made by a robot or human assistant. A 2x2x2 experiment was conducted with nationality (US vs. Chinese), in group strength (weak vs. strong) and human vs. robot assistant as dimensions. US participants reported higher trust of and compliance with the assistants (human and robot) although when the assistant was characterized as a strong ingroup member, Chinese as compared with the US subjects were more comfortable. Chinese also reported a stronger sense of control with both assistants and were more likely to anthropomorphize the robot than were US subjects. This pattern of findings confirms that people from different national cultures may respond differently to robots, but also suggests that predictions from human-human interaction do not hold universally.

© All rights reserved Evers et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Evers, Vanessa, Sturm, Christian, Rocha, Mario Alberto Moreno, Martnez, Edgar Cambranes and Mandl, Thomas (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 8 - IWIPS 2007 - Proceedings of the Eighth International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems 28-30 June, 2007, Merida, Mexico.

 
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Cramer, Henriette S. M., Evers, Vanessa, Someren, Maarten van, Wielinga, Bob J., Besselink, Sam, Rutledge, Lloyd, Stash, Natalia and Aroyo, Lora (2007): User Interaction with User-Adaptive Information Filters. In: Aykin, Nuray M. (ed.) UI-HCII 2007 - Second International Conference on Usability and Internationalization - Part II July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 324-333. Available online

2005
 
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Dam, Nik van, Evers, Vanessa and Arts, Florann A. (2005): Cultural User Experience Issues in E-government: Designing for a Multi-cultural Society. In: Besselaar, Peter Van den and Koizumi, Satoshi (eds.) Digital Cities III - Third International Digital Cities Workshop September 18-19, 2005, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 310-324. Available online

 
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Day, Donald L., Evers, Vanessa and Galdo, Elisa del (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 7 - IWIPS 2005 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems 7-9 July, 2005, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

2004
 
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Evers, Vanessa, Galdo, Elisa del, Cyr, Dianne and Bonanni, Carole (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 6 - IWIPS 2004 - Sixth International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems 8-10 July, 2004, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

 
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Cramer, Henriette S. M., Evers, Vanessa, Zudilova, Elena V. and Sloot, Peter M. A. (2004): Context analysis to support development of virtual reality applications. In Virtual Reality, 7 (3) pp. 177-186. Available online

2003
 
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Evers, Vanessa, Rose, Kerstin, Honold, Pia, Coronado, Jos and Day, Donald L. (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 5 - IWIPS 2003 - Fifth International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems 17-19 July, 2003, Berlin, Germany.

 
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Evers, Vanessa (2003): Cross-Cultural Aspects of User Understanding and Behaviour: Evaluation of a Virtual Campus Website by Users from Japan, the US, England and the Netherlands. In: Evers, Vanessa, Rose, Kerstin, Honold, Pia, Coronado, Jos and Day, Donald L. (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 5 - IWIPS 2003 - Fifth International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems 17-19 July, 2003, Berlin, Germany. pp. 189-.

1999
 
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Day, Donald L. and Evers, Vanessa (1999): Questionnaire development for multicultural samples. In: Prabhu, Girish V. and delGaldo, Elisa M. (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 1 - IWIPS 1999 - First International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems May 20-22, 1999, Rochester, New York, USA. pp. 153-162.

 
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Evers, Vanessa, Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes and Jones, A. (1999): Cross-cultural understanding of interface design: A cross-cultural analysis of icon recognition. In: Prabhu, Girish V. and delGaldo, Elisa M. (eds.) Designing for Global Markets 1 - IWIPS 1999 - First International Workshop on Internationalisation of Products and Systems May 20-22, 1999, Rochester, New York, USA. pp. 173-182.

 
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