Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2009
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:16



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Mor Naaman:4
Scott Carter:4
Tara Matthews:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Tye Rattenbury's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Anind K. Dey:71
Jennifer Mankoff:45
Allison Woodruff:32
 
 
 

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Tye Rattenbury

 

Publications by Tye Rattenbury (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Rattenbury, Tye and Naaman, Mor (2009): Methods for extracting place semantics from Flickr tags. In ACM Transactions on the Web, 3 (1) p. 1. Available online

We describe an approach for extracting semantics for tags, unstructured text-labels assigned to resources on the Web, based on each tag's usage patterns. In particular, we focus on the problem of extracting place semantics for tags that are assigned to photos on Flickr, a popular-photo sharing Web site that supports location (latitude/longitude) metadata for photos. We propose the adaptation of two baseline methods, inspired by well-known burst-analysis techniques, for the task; we also describe two novel methods, TagMaps and scale-structure identification. We evaluate the methods on a subset of Flickr data. We show that our scale-structure identification method outperforms existing techniques and that a hybrid approach generates further improvements (achieving 85% precision at 81% recall). The approach and methods described in this work can be used in other domains such as geo-annotated Web pages, where text terms can be extracted and associated with usage patterns.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury and Naaman and/or ACM

2008
 
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Rattenbury, Tye, Nafus, Dawn and Anderson, Ken (2008): Plastic: a metaphor for integrated technologies. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 232-241. Available online

2007
 
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Rattenbury, Tye and Canny, John (2007): CAAD: an automatic task support system. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 687-696. Available online

Recent HCI research shows strong interest in task management systems (e.g. [19, 27]) that support the multi-tasked nature of information work [13]. These systems either require users to manually create and maintain task representations or they depend on explicit user cues to guide the creation and maintenance process. To access and use the task representations in these systems, users must also specify their current task. This interaction overhead inhibits the adoption of these systems. In this paper, we present a novel approach to task management that automates the creation and maintenance of task representations. Our system supports the user by making commonly used information more "ready-at-hand" through an intuitive visualization of their task representations. Users can correct and organize their task representations by directly manipulating the visualization; however, this interaction is not required. We describe a feasibility study that demonstrates the actual utility (in terms of overhead reduction) and perceived utility of our system.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury and Canny and/or ACM Press

 
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Rattenbury, Tye, Good, Nathan and Naaman, Mor (2007): Towards extracting flickr tag semantics. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2007. pp. 1287-1288. Available online

We address the problem of extracting semantics of tags -- short, unstructured text-labels assigned to resources on the Web -- based on each tag's metadata patterns. In particular, we describe an approach for extracting place and event semantics for tags that are assigned to photos on Flickr, a popular photo sharing website supporting time and location (latitude/longitude) metadata. The approach can be generalized to other domains where text terms can be extracted and associated with metadata patterns, such as geo-annotated web pages.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury et al. and/or International World Wide Web Conference Committee

 
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Matthews, Tara, Rattenbury, Tye and Carter, Scott (2007): Defining, Designing, and Evaluating Peripheral Displays: An Analysis Using Activity Theory. In Human Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 221-261.

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to balance multiple activities. However, peripheral display innovation and development has suffered because much of the past work has been technology driven: There exists little theoretical understanding of how they operate in relation to people's everyday lives. In response to this, we present a framework for understanding, designing, and evaluating peripheral displays based on Activity Theory. We argue that peripheral displays are information displays that become unobtrusive to users. As this quality depends on the context of use, we present a framework for describing peripheral displays based on the number and types of activities they support. Furthermore, we argue that different types of displays require different approaches to evaluation. From our own work and a review of related literature we derive a set of general evaluation criteria for peripheral displays (appeal, learnability, awareness, effects of breakdowns, and distraction). We then describe approaches for evaluating these criteria for different types of peripheral displays and present a case study to illustrate the value of our Activity Theory evaluation framework in practice.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum

 
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Rattenbury, Tye, Good, Nathaniel and Naaman, Mor (2007): Towards automatic extraction of event and place semantics from Flickr tags. In: Proceedings of the 30th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2007. pp. 103-110. Available online

We describe an approach for extracting semantics of tags, unstructured text-labels assigned to resources on the Web, based on each tag's usage patterns. In particular, we focus on the problem of extracting place and event semantics for tags that are assigned to photos on Flickr, a popular photo sharing website that supports time and location (latitude/longitude) metadata. We analyze two methods inspired by well-known burst-analysis techniques and one novel method: Scale-structure Identification. We evaluate the methods on a subset of Flickr data, and show that our Scale-structure Identification method outperforms the existing techniques. The approach and methods described in this work can be used in other domains such as geo-annotated web pages, where text terms can be extracted and associated with usage patterns.

© All rights reserved Rattenbury et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Matthews, Tara, Rattenbury, Tye and Carter, Scott (2007): Defining, Designing, and Evaluating Peripheral Displays: An Analysis Using Activity Theory. In Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 221-261. Available online

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to balance multiple activities. However, peripheral display innovation and development has suffered because much of the past work has been technology driven: There exists little theoretical understanding of how they operate in relation to people's everyday lives. In response to this, we present a framework for understanding, designing, and evaluating peripheral displays based on Activity Theory. We argue that peripheral displays are information displays that become unobtrusive to users. As this quality depends on the context of use, we present a framework for describing peripheral displays based on the number and types of activities they support. Furthermore, we argue that different types of displays require different approaches to evaluation. From our own work and a review of related literature we derive a set of general evaluation criteria for peripheral displays (appeal, learnability, awareness, effects of breakdowns, and distraction). We then describe approaches for evaluating these criteria for different types of peripheral displays and present a case study to illustrate the value of our Activity Theory evaluation framework in practice.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Kennedy, Lyndon S., Naaman, Mor, Ahern, Shane, Nair, Rahul and Rattenbury, Tye (2007): How flickr helps us make sense of the world: context and content in community-contributed media collections. In: Lienhart, Rainer, Prasad, Anand R., Hanjalic, Alan, Choi, Sunghyun, Bailey, Brian P. and Sebe, Nicu (eds.) Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Multimedia 2007 September 24-29, 2007, Augsburg, Germany. pp. 631-640. Available online

 
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Matthews, Tara, Rattenbury, Tye and Carter, Scott (2007): Defining, Designing, and Evaluating Peripheral Displays: An Analysis Using Activity Theory. In Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 221-261. Available online

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to balance multiple activities. However, peripheral display innovation and development has suffered because much of the past work has been technology driven: There exists little theoretical understanding of how they operate in relation to people's everyday lives. In response to this, we present a framework for understanding, designing, and evaluating peripheral displays based on Activity Theory. We argue that peripheral displays are information displays that become unobtrusive to users. As this quality depends on the context of use, we present a framework for describing peripheral displays based on the number and types of activities they support. Furthermore, we argue that different types of displays require different approaches to evaluation. From our own work and a review of related literature we derive a set of general evaluation criteria for peripheral displays (appeal, learnability, awareness, effects of breakdowns, and distraction). We then describe approaches for evaluating these criteria for different types of peripheral displays and present a case study to illustrate the value of our Activity Theory evaluation framework in practice.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

2006
 
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Aipperspach, Ryan, Rattenbury, Tye, Woodruff, Allison and Canny, John F. (2006): A Quantitative Method for Revealing and Comparing Places in the Home. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 1-18. Available online

2004
 
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Matthews, Tara, Dey, Anind K., Mankoff, Jennifer, Carter, Scott and Rattenbury, Tye (2004): A toolkit for managing user attention in peripheral displays. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 247-256. Available online

Traditionally, computer interfaces have been confined to conventional displays and focused activities. However, as displays become embedded throughout our environment and daily lives, increasing numbers of them must operate on the periphery of our attention. Peripheral displays can allow a person to be aware of information while she is attending to some other primary task or activity. We present the Peripheral Displays Toolkit (PTK), a toolkit that provides structured support for managing user attention in the development of peripheral displays. Our goal is to enable designers to explore different approaches to managing user attention. The PTK supports three issues specific to conveying information on the periphery of human attention. These issues are abstraction of raw input, rules for assigning notification levels to input, and transitions for updating a display when input arrives. Our contribution is the investigation of issues specific to attention in peripheral display design and a toolkit that encapsulates support for these issues. We describe our toolkit architecture and present five sample peripheral displays demonstrating our toolkit\'s capabilities.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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