Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2012
Pub. count:4
Number of co-authors:14



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Maneesh Agrawala:3
Kenrick Kin:3
Bjorn Hartmann:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Tony DeRose's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Maneesh Agrawala:36
Bjorn Hartmann:27
Kenrick Kin:3
 
 
 

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Tony DeRose

 

Publications by Tony DeRose (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Kin, Kenrick, Hartmann, Bjorn, DeRose, Tony and Agrawala, Maneesh (2012): Proton++: a customizable declarative multitouch framework. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 477-486. Available online

Proton++ is a declarative multitouch framework that allows developers to describe multitouch gestures as regular expressions of touch event symbols. It builds on the Proton framework by allowing developers to incorporate custom touch attributes directly into the gesture description. These custom attributes increase the expressivity of the gestures, while preserving the benefits of Proton: automatic gesture matching, static analysis of conflict detection, and graphical gesture creation. We demonstrate Proton++'s flexibility with several examples: a direction attribute for describing trajectory, a pinch attribute for detecting when touches move towards one another, a touch area attribute for simulating pressure, an orientation attribute for selecting menu items, and a screen location attribute for simulating hand ID. We also use screen location to simulate user ID and enable simultaneous recognition of gestures by multiple users. In addition, we show how to incorporate timing into Proton++ gestures by reporting touch events at a regular time interval. Finally, we present a user study that suggests that users are roughly four times faster at interpreting gestures written using Proton++ than those written in procedural event-handling code commonly used today.

© All rights reserved Kin et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Kin, Kenrick, Miller, Tom, Bollensdorff, Bjorn, DeRose, Tony, Hartmann, Bjorn and Agrawala, Maneesh (2011): Eden: a professional multitouch tool for constructing virtual organic environments. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1343-1352. Available online

Set construction is the process of selecting and positioning virtual geometric objects to create a virtual environment used in a computer-animated film. Set construction artists often have a clear mental image of the set composition, but find it tedious to build their intended sets with current mouse and keyboard interfaces. We investigate whether multitouch input can ease the process of set construction. Working with a professional set construction artist at Pixar Animation Studios, we designed and developed Eden, a fully functional multitouch set construction application. In this paper, we describe our design process and how we balanced the advantages and disadvantages of multitouch input to develop usable gestures for set construction. Based on our design process and the user experiences of two set construction artists, we present a general set of lessons we learned regarding the design of a multitouch interface.

© All rights reserved Kin et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Kin, Kenrick, Agrawala, Maneesh and DeRose, Tony (2009): Determining the benefits of direct-touch, bimanual, and multifinger input on a multitouch workstation. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on Graphics Interface 2009. pp. 119-124. Available online

Multitouch workstations support direct-touch, bimanual, and multifinger interaction. Previous studies have separately examined the benefits of these three interaction attributes over mouse-based interactions. In contrast, we present an empirical user study that considers these three interaction attributes together for a single task, such that we can quantify and compare the performances of each attribute. In our experiment users select multiple targets using either a mouse-based workstation equipped with one mouse, or a multitouch workstation using either one finger, two fingers (one from each hand), or multiple fingers. We find that the fastest multitouch condition is about twice as fast as the mouse-based workstation, independent of the number of targets. Direct-touch with one finger accounts for an average of 83% of the reduction in selection time. Bimanual interaction, using at least two fingers, one on each hand, accounts for the remaining reduction in selection time. Further, we find that for novice multitouch users there is no significant difference in selection time between using one finger on each hand and using any number of fingers for this task. Based on these observations we conclude with several design guidelines for developing multitouch user interfaces.

© All rights reserved Kin et al. and/or their publisher

1989
 
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DeRose, Tony, Bailey, Mary L., Barnard, Bill, Cypher, Robert, Dobrikin, David, Ebeling, Carl, Konstantinidou, Smaragda, McMurchie, Larry, Mizrahi, Haim and Yost, Bill (1989): Apex: two architectures for generating parametric curves and surfaces. In The Visual Computer, 5 (5) pp. 264-276. Available online

 
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