Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2011
Pub. count:18
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Scott Carter:6
Jennifer Mankoff:5
Tye Rattenbury:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Tara Matthews's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Mary Czerwinski:80
Hans-Werner Geller..:73
Anind K. Dey:71
 
 
 

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Tara Matthews

 

Publications by Tara Matthews (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Chi, ChangYan, Liao, Qinying, Pan, Yingxin, Zhao, Shiwan, Matthews, Tara, Moran, Thomas P., Zhou, Michelle X., Millen, David, Lin, Ching-Yung and Guy, Ido (2011): Smarter social collaboration at IBM research. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 159-166. Available online

In this paper we feature a set of research projects done at several IBM Research laboratories across the world. The work featured here focuses on the topic of smart social collaboration, which studies, designs, and develops social collaboration principles and technologies that can help customize and enhance existing social collaboration tools to suit specific user needs, including cultural, business, and personal needs.

© All rights reserved Chi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Matthews, Tara, Whittaker, Steve, Moran, Thomas and Yuen, Sandra (2011): Collaboration personas: a new approach to designing workplace collaboration tools. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2247-2256. Available online

The success of social computing has generated a host of workplace collaboration tools. However, adoption of these tools by entire groups is a major problem. One reason for the adoption problem is a lack of methods for considering collaborative groups in technology design. Even when designing collaboration tools, designers often employ methods that focus on individuals. This leads to tools that are not well targeted at the groups who will use them. To solve this problem, we propose the notion of collaboration personas, which are empirically derived descriptions of hypothetical groups, including details that inform the design of collaboration tools. Collaboration personas differ from individual personas in having (1) multiple, inter-related individuals playing specific roles; (2) a focus on collective goals and elaboration of individual goals that affect the collective goal; and (3) new attributes that characterize collaborative aspects of the group's work. We contrast collaboration personas with other design approaches and provide examples of how they can be used to design new collaborative tools that better meet the needs of typical groups.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mahmud, Jalal, Matthews, Tara, Whittaker, Steve, Moran, Tom and Lau, Tessa (2011): Topika: integrating collaborative sharing with email. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3161-3164. Available online

New enterprise tools (wikis, team spaces, social tags) offer potential benefits for enterprise collaboration, providing shared resources to organize work. However, a vast amount of collaboration still takes place by email. But email is problematic for collaboration because information may be distributed across multiple messages in an overloaded inbox. Email also increases workload as each individual has to manage their own versions of collaborative materials. We present a novel system, Topika that integrates email with collaboration tools. It allows users to continue to use email while also enjoying the benefits of these dedicated tools. When a user composes an email Topika analyzes the message and suggests relevant shared spaces (e.g., wiki pages) within the user's collaboration tools. This allows her to post the email to those spaces. An evaluation of Topika's suggestion algorithm shows that it performs well at accurately suggesting shared spaces.

© All rights reserved Mahmud et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Whittaker, Steve, Matthews, Tara, Cerruti, Julian, Badenes, Hernan and Tang, John (2011): Am I wasting my time organizing email?: a study of email refinding. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3449-3458. Available online

We all spend time every day looking for information in our email, yet we know little about this refinding process. Some users expend considerable preparatory effort creating complex folder structures to promote effective refinding. However modern email clients provide alternative opportunistic methods for access, such as search and threading, that promise to reduce the need to manually prepare. To compare these different refinding strategies, we instrumented a modern email client that supports search, folders, tagging and threading. We carried out a field study of 345 long-term users who conducted over 85,000 refinding actions. Our data support opportunistic access. People who create complex folders indeed rely on these for retrieval, but these preparatory behaviors are inefficient and do not improve retrieval success. In contrast, both search and threading promote more effective finding. We present design implications: current search-based clients ignore scrolling, the most prevalent refinding behavior, and threading approaches need to be extended.

© All rights reserved Whittaker et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Balakrishnan, Aruna D., Matthews, Tara and Moran, Thomas P. (2010): Fitting an activity-centric system into an ecology of workplace tools. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 787-790. Available online

Knowledge workers expend considerable effort managing fragmentation, characterized by constant switching among digital artifacts, when executing work activities. Activity-centric computing (ACC) systems attempt to address this problem by organizing activity-related artifacts together. But are ACC systems effective at reducing fragmentation? In this paper, we present a two-part study of workers using Lotus Activities, an ACC system deployed for over two years in a large company. First, we surveyed workers to understand the ecology of workplace tools they use for various tasks. Second, we interviewed 22 Lotus Activities users to investigate how this ACC tool fits amongst their ecology of existing collaboration tools and affects work fragmentation. Our results indicate that Lotus Activities works in concert with certain other tools to successfully ease fragmentation for a specific type of activity. We identify design characteristics that contribute to this result.

© All rights reserved Balakrishnan et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Leshed, Gilly, Haber, Eben M., Matthews, Tara and Lau, Tessa (2008): CoScripter: automating & sharing how-to knowledge in the enterprise. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1719-1728. Available online

Modern enterprises are replete with numerous online processes. Many must be performed frequently and are tedious, while others are done less frequently yet are complex or hard to remember. We present interviews with knowledge workers that reveal a need for mechanisms to automate the execution of and to share knowledge about these processes. In response, we have developed the CoScripter system (formerly Koala [11]), a collaborative scripting environment for recording, automating, and sharing web-based processes. We have deployed CoScripter within a large corporation for more than 10 months. Through usage log analysis and interviews with users, we show that CoScripter has addressed many user automation and sharing needs, to the extent that more than 50 employees have voluntarily incorporated it into their work practice. We also present ways people have used CoScripter and general issues for tools that support automation and sharing of how-to knowledge.

© All rights reserved Leshed et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]


 
 
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Carter, Scott, Mankoff, Jennifer, Klemmer, Scott R. and Matthews, Tara (2008): Exiting the Cleanroom: On Ecological Validity and Ubiquitous Computing. In Human-Computer Interaction, 23 (1) pp. 47-99. Available online

Over the past decade and a half, corporations and academies have invested considerable time and money in the realization of ubiquitous computing. Yet design approaches that yield ecologically valid understandings of ubiquitous computing systems, which can help designers make design decisions based on how systems perform in the context of actual experience, remain rare. The central question underlying this article is, What barriers stand in the way of real-world, ecologically valid design for ubicomp? Using a literature survey and interviews with 28 developers, we illustrate how issues of sensing and scale cause ubicomp systems to resist iteration, prototype creation, and ecologically valid evaluation. In particular, we found that developers have difficulty creating prototypes that are both robust enough for realistic use and able to handle ambiguity and error and that they struggle to gather useful data from evaluations because critical events occur infrequently, because the level of use necessary to evaluate the system is difficult to maintain, or because the evaluation itself interferes with use of the system. We outline pitfalls for developers to avoid as well as practical solutions, and we draw on our results to outline research challenges for the future. Crucially, we do not argue for particular processes, sets of metrics, or intended outcomes, but rather we focus on prototyping tools and evaluation methods that support realistic use in realistic settings that can be selected according to the needs and goals of a particular developer or researcher.

© All rights reserved Carter et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

2007
 
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Matthews, Tara, Rattenbury, Tye and Carter, Scott (2007): Defining, Designing, and Evaluating Peripheral Displays: An Analysis Using Activity Theory. In Human Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 221-261.

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to balance multiple activities. However, peripheral display innovation and development has suffered because much of the past work has been technology driven: There exists little theoretical understanding of how they operate in relation to people's everyday lives. In response to this, we present a framework for understanding, designing, and evaluating peripheral displays based on Activity Theory. We argue that peripheral displays are information displays that become unobtrusive to users. As this quality depends on the context of use, we present a framework for describing peripheral displays based on the number and types of activities they support. Furthermore, we argue that different types of displays require different approaches to evaluation. From our own work and a review of related literature we derive a set of general evaluation criteria for peripheral displays (appeal, learnability, awareness, effects of breakdowns, and distraction). We then describe approaches for evaluating these criteria for different types of peripheral displays and present a case study to illustrate the value of our Activity Theory evaluation framework in practice.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum

 
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Matthews, Tara, Rattenbury, Tye and Carter, Scott (2007): Defining, Designing, and Evaluating Peripheral Displays: An Analysis Using Activity Theory. In Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 221-261. Available online

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to balance multiple activities. However, peripheral display innovation and development has suffered because much of the past work has been technology driven: There exists little theoretical understanding of how they operate in relation to people's everyday lives. In response to this, we present a framework for understanding, designing, and evaluating peripheral displays based on Activity Theory. We argue that peripheral displays are information displays that become unobtrusive to users. As this quality depends on the context of use, we present a framework for describing peripheral displays based on the number and types of activities they support. Furthermore, we argue that different types of displays require different approaches to evaluation. From our own work and a review of related literature we derive a set of general evaluation criteria for peripheral displays (appeal, learnability, awareness, effects of breakdowns, and distraction). We then describe approaches for evaluating these criteria for different types of peripheral displays and present a case study to illustrate the value of our Activity Theory evaluation framework in practice.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Matthews, Tara, Rattenbury, Tye and Carter, Scott (2007): Defining, Designing, and Evaluating Peripheral Displays: An Analysis Using Activity Theory. In Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 221-261. Available online

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to balance multiple activities. However, peripheral display innovation and development has suffered because much of the past work has been technology driven: There exists little theoretical understanding of how they operate in relation to people's everyday lives. In response to this, we present a framework for understanding, designing, and evaluating peripheral displays based on Activity Theory. We argue that peripheral displays are information displays that become unobtrusive to users. As this quality depends on the context of use, we present a framework for describing peripheral displays based on the number and types of activities they support. Furthermore, we argue that different types of displays require different approaches to evaluation. From our own work and a review of related literature we derive a set of general evaluation criteria for peripheral displays (appeal, learnability, awareness, effects of breakdowns, and distraction). We then describe approaches for evaluating these criteria for different types of peripheral displays and present a case study to illustrate the value of our Activity Theory evaluation framework in practice.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

2006
 
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Matthews, Tara, Czerwinski, Mary, Robertson, George G. and Tan, Desney S. (2006): Clipping lists and change borders: improving multitasking efficiency with peripheral information design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 989-998. Available online

Information workers often have to balance many tasks and interruptions. In this work, we explore peripheral display techniques that improve multitasking efficiency by helping users maintain task flow, know when to resume tasks, and more easily reacquire tasks. Specifically, we compare two types of abstraction that provide different task information: semantic content extraction, which displays only the most relevant content in a window, and change detection, which signals when a change has occurred in a window (all de-signed as modifications to Scalable Fabric [17]). Results from our user study suggest that semantic content extraction improves multitasking performance more so than either change detection or our base case of scaling. Results also show that semantic content extraction provides significant benefits to task flow, resumption timing, and reacquisition. We discuss the implication of these findings on the design of peripheral interfaces that support multitasking.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Matthews, Tara, Fong, Janette, Ho-Ching, F. Wai-ling and Mankoff, Jennifer (2006): Evaluating non-speech sound visualizations for the deaf. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 25 (4) pp. 333-351. Available online

Sounds such as co-workers chatting nearby or a dripping faucet help us maintain awareness of and respond to our surroundings. Without a tool that communicates ambient sounds in a non-auditory manner, maintaining this awareness is difficult for people who are deaf. We present an iterative investigation of peripheral, visual displays of ambient sounds. Our major contributions are: (1) a rich understanding of what ambient sounds are useful to people who are deaf, (2) a set of visual and functional requirements for a peripheral sound display, based on feedback from people who are deaf, (3) lab-based evaluations investigating the characteristics of four prototypes, and (4) a set of design guidelines for successful ambient audio displays, based on a comparison of four implemented prototypes and user feedback. Our work provides valuable information about the sound awareness needs of the deaf and can help to inform further design of such applications.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Matthews, Tara (2006): Designing and evaluating glanceable peripheral displays. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 343-345. Available online

Peripheral displays are an important class of applications that improve our ability to multitask. Increased knowledge on how to design and evaluate glanceable peripheral displays can lead to better support for multitasking. We will contribute a set of guidelines for designing glanceable peripheral displays, using the wealth of abstraction techniques (e.g., change detection, feature extraction), design variables (e.g., color, shape), and design characteristics (e.g., dimensionality, symbolism) available. We will contribute an evaluation framework that clearly defines peripheral displays, metrics for evaluating their success, and guidelines for selecting evaluation methods. These contributions will improve peripheral displays that enable users to manage multiple tasks through low-effort monitoring.

© All rights reserved Matthews and/or ACM Press

 
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Matthews, Tara, Carter, Scott, Pai, Carol, Fong, Janette and Mankoff, Jennifer (2006): Scribe4Me: Evaluating a Mobile Sound Transcription Tool for the Deaf. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 159-176. Available online

2005
 
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Matthews, Tara, Fong, Janette and Mankoff, Jennifer (2005): Visualizing non-speech sounds for the deaf. In: Seventh Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2005. pp. 52-59. Available online

Sounds constantly occur around us, keeping us aware of our surroundings. People who are deaf have difficulty maintaining an awareness of these ambient sounds. We present an investigation of peripheral, visual displays to help people who are deaf maintain an awareness of sounds in the environment. Our contribution is twofold. First, we present a set of visual design preferences and functional requirements for peripheral visualizations of non-speech audio that will help improve future applications. Visual design preferences include ease of interpretation, glance-ability, and appropriate distractions. Functional requirements include the ability to identify what sound occurred, view a history of displayed sounds, customize the information that is shown, and determine the accuracy of displayed information. Second, we designed, implemented, and evaluated two fully functioning prototypes that embody these preferences and requirements, serving as examples for future designers and furthering progress toward understanding how to best provide peripheral audio awareness for the deaf.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Consolvo, Sunny, Smith, Ian E., Matthews, Tara, LaMarca, Anthony, Tabert, Jason and Powledge, Pauline (2005): Location disclosure to social relations: why, when, & what people want to share. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 81-90. Available online

Advances in location-enhanced technology are making it easier for us to be located by others. These new technologies present a difficult privacy tradeoff, as disclosing one's location to another person or service could be risky, yet valuable. To explore whether and what users are willing to disclose about their location to social relations, we conducted a three-phased formative study. Our results show that the most important factors were who was requesting, why the requester wanted the participant's location, and what level of detail would be most useful to the requester. After determining these, participants were typically willing to disclose either the most useful detail or nothing about their location. From our findings, we reflect on the decision process for location disclosure. With these results, we hope to influence the design of future location-enhanced applications and services.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Matthews, Tara, Dey, Anind K., Mankoff, Jennifer, Carter, Scott and Rattenbury, Tye (2004): A toolkit for managing user attention in peripheral displays. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 247-256. Available online

Traditionally, computer interfaces have been confined to conventional displays and focused activities. However, as displays become embedded throughout our environment and daily lives, increasing numbers of them must operate on the periphery of our attention. Peripheral displays can allow a person to be aware of information while she is attending to some other primary task or activity. We present the Peripheral Displays Toolkit (PTK), a toolkit that provides structured support for managing user attention in the development of peripheral displays. Our goal is to enable designers to explore different approaches to managing user attention. The PTK supports three issues specific to conveying information on the periphery of human attention. These issues are abstraction of raw input, rules for assigning notification levels to input, and transitions for updating a display when input arrives. Our contribution is the investigation of issues specific to attention in peripheral display design and a toolkit that encapsulates support for these issues. We describe our toolkit architecture and present five sample peripheral displays demonstrating our toolkit\'s capabilities.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Matthews, Tara, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Laerhoven, Kristof van and Dey, Anind K. (2004): Augmenting Collections of Everyday Objects: A Case Study of Clothes Hangers As an Information Display. In: Ferscha, Alois and Mattern, Friedemann (eds.) PERVASIVE 2004 - Pervasive Computing, Second International Conference April 21-23, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 340-344. Available online

 
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