Publication statistics

Pub. period:1989-2010
Pub. count:14
Number of co-authors:15



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

William Cheung:1
Suman Karumuri:1
Joshua Kaplan:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steven P. Reiss's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Joseph J. LaViola:29
Robert Zeleznik:12
Andrew Bragdon:9
 
 
 

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Steven P. Reiss

 

Publications by Steven P. Reiss (bibliography)

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2010
 
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Bragdon, Andrew, Zeleznik, Robert, Reiss, Steven P., Karumuri, Suman, Cheung, William, Kaplan, Joshua, Coleman, Christopher, Adeputra, Ferdi and LaViola, Joseph J. (2010): Code bubbles: a working set-based interface for code understanding and maintenance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2503-2512. Available online

Developers spend significant time reading and navigating code fragments spread across multiple locations. The file-based nature of contemporary IDEs makes it prohibitively difficult to create and maintain a simultaneous view of such fragments. We propose a novel user interface metaphor for code understanding based on collections of lightweight, editable fragments called bubbles, which form concurrently visible working sets. We present the results of a qualitative usability evaluation, and the results of a quantitative study which indicates Code Bubbles significantly improved code understanding time, while reducing navigation interactions over a widely-used IDE, for two controlled tasks.

© All rights reserved Bragdon et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (2007): Visual representations of executing programs. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 18 (2) pp. 126-148. Available online

2006
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (2006): Visualizing program execution using user abstractions. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Software Visualization 2006. pp. 125-134. Available online

A practical system that uses visualization for understanding the execution of complex programs must offer the user views of the execution that are specific to the program being understood and the particular problem at hand without significantly slowing down or perturbing the system being examined. This paper describes a visualization data model and its implementation that accomplishes this. The model starts with program events that can be instrumented efficiently and with little overhead. It uses extended finite state automata to model program behaviors in terms of events. It builds time-varying data structures based on these automata. The data structures are then made available to various visualizations through a set of mappings that let the user dynamically control the visualization. The model and its implementation have been demonstrated on a range of specific understanding problems with a variety of different visualizations.

© All rights reserved Reiss and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Reiss, Steven P. and Eddon, Guy (2005): Visualizing What People Are Doing on the Web. In: VL-HCC 2005 - IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 21-24 September, 2005, Dallas, TX, USA. pp. 305-307. Available online

 
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Reiss, Steven P. and Renieris, Manos (2005): Jove: java as it happens. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Software Visualization 2005. pp. 115-124. Available online

Dynamic software visualization is designed to provide programmers with insights as to what the program is doing. Most current dynamic visualizations either use program traces to show information about prior runs, slow the program down substantially, show only minimal information, or force the programmer to indicate when to turn visualizations on or off. We have developed a dynamic Java visualizer that provides a statement-level view of a Java program in action with low enough overhead so that it can be used almost all the time by programmers to understand what their program is doing while it is doing it.

© All rights reserved Reiss and Renieris and/or ACM Press

2003
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (2003): Visualizing Java in action. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Software Visualization 2003. pp. 57-ff. Available online

Dynamic software visualization is supposed to provide programmers with insights as to what the program is doing. Most current dynamic visualizations either use program traces to show information about prior runs, slow the program down substantially, show only minimal information, or force the programmer to indicate when to turn visualizations on or off. We have developed a dynamic Java visualizer that provides a view of a program in action with low enough overhead so that it can be used almost all the time by programmers to understand what their program is doing while it is doing it.

© All rights reserved Reiss and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (2002): A Visual Query Language for Software Visualization. In: HCC 2002 - IEEE CS International Symposium on Human-Centric Computing Languages and Environments 3-6 September, 2002, Arlington, VA, USA. pp. 80-82. Available online

2000
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (2000): Working with Patterns and Code. In: HICSS 2000 2000. . Available online

1997
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (1997): Cacti: a front end for program visualization. In: InfoVis 1997 - IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization October 18-25, 1997, Phoenix, AZ, USA. pp. 46-. Available online

1995
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (1995): An Engine for the 3D Visualization of Program Information. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 6 (3) pp. 299-323.

1993
 
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Sarkar, Manojit, Snibbe, Scott S., Tversky, Oren J. and Reiss, Steven P. (1993): Stretching the Rubber Sheet: A Metophor for Visualizing Large Layouts on Small Screens. In: Hudson, Scott E., Pausch, Randy, Zanden, Brad Vander and Foley, James D. (eds.) Proceedings of the 6th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology 1993, Atlanta, Georgia, United States. pp. 81-91. Available online

We propose the metaphor of rubber sheet stretching for viewing large and complex layouts within small display areas. Imagine the original 2D layout on a rubber sheet. Users can select and enlarge different areas of the sheet by holding and stretching it with a set of special tools called handles. As the user stretches an area, a greater level of detail is displayed there. The technique has some additional desirable features such as areas specified as arbitrary closed polygons, multiple regions of interest, and uniform scaling inside the stretched regions.

© All rights reserved Sarkar et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Bifocal Display: [/encyclopedia/bifocal_display.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Bifocal Display: [/encyclopedia/bifocal_display.html]


 
 
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Reiss, Steven P. (1993): Presentation and Editing of Structured 3-D Graphics. In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1993. pp. 397-402.

This paper provides an overview of our efforts at providing high-quality, 3-D visualizations of information about programs. This data is generated by querying the different information sources through a single object-oriented database schema. The result of the query is a set of abstraction objects that are then mapped, through a set of user-definable translations, into a set of abstract graphical objects that represent the display. A separate package handles layout, constraints, and presentation of these graphical objects. The resultant display is interactive at three levels. Syntactic interactions allow the user to pan, zoom and fly around in 3-D space. Semantic interactions allow user actions to affect the translations from abstraction objects into abstract graphical objects and to change the set of abstraction objects by modifying the initial query.

© All rights reserved Reiss and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Reiss, Steven P. (1993): A Framework for Abstract 3D Visualization. In: Proceedings of the 1993 IEEE Workshop on Visual Languages August 24-27, 1993, Bergen, Norway. pp. 108-115.

1989
 
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Reiss, Steven P., Meyers, Scott and Duby, Carolyn (1989): Using GELO to Visualize Software Systems. In: Sibert, John L. (ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology November 13 - 15, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. pp. 149-157.

GELO is a package that supports the interactive graphical display of software systems. Its features include built-in panning and zooming, abstraction of objects too small to see, pick correlation, windowing, and scroll bars. GELO creates a hierarchy of graphical objects that correspond to the components of the structure being displayed. Five flavors of graphical objects are supported, including those for simple structures, tiled layouts, and graph-based layouts. This framework is powerful enough to handle a wide variety of graphical visualizations, and it is general enough that new object flavors can be smoothly integrated in the future. GELO is easy to learn and to use, and is presently employed in two software development environments. Among its current applications are a variety of visual languages, an interactive display of call graphs, an interactive display of data structures, and a graphical representation of module dependencies.

© All rights reserved Reiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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