Publication statistics

Pub. period:2003-2012
Pub. count:16
Number of co-authors:25



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Blair MacIntyre:11
Maribeth Gandy:7
Jay David Bolter:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steven Dow's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Blair MacIntyre:43
Yang Li:30
 
 
 

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Steven Dow

 

Publications by Steven Dow (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Dow, Steven, Kulkarni, Anand, Klemmer, Scott and Hartmann, Bjorn (2012): Shepherding the crowd yields better work. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 1013-1022. Available online

Micro-task platforms provide massively parallel, on-demand labor. However, it can be difficult to reliably achieve high-quality work because online workers may behave irresponsibly, misunderstand the task, or lack necessary skills. This paper investigates whether timely, task-specific feedback helps crowd workers learn, persevere, and produce better results. We investigate this question through Shepherd, a feedback system for crowdsourced work. In a between-subjects study with three conditions, crowd workers wrote consumer reviews for six products they own. Participants in the None condition received no immediate feedback, consistent with most current crowdsourcing practices. Participants in the Self-assessment condition judged their own work. Participants in the External assessment condition received expert feedback. Self-assessment alone yielded better overall work than the None condition and helped workers improve over time. External assessment also yielded these benefits. Participants who received external assessment also revised their work more. We conclude by discussing interaction and infrastructure approaches for integrating real-time assessment into online work.

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Dow, Steven, Fortuna, Julie, Schwartz, Dan, Altringer, Beth, Schwartz, Daniel and Klemmer, Scott (2011): Prototyping dynamics: sharing multiple designs improves exploration, group rapport, and results. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2807-2816. Available online

Prototypes ground group communication and facilitate decision making. However, overly investing in a single design idea can lead to fixation and impede the collaborative process. Does sharing multiple designs improve collaboration? In a study, participants created advertisements individually and then met with a partner. In the Share Multiple condition, participants designed and shared three ads. In the Share Best condition, participants designed three ads and selected one to share. In the Share One condition, participants designed and shared one ad. Sharing multiple designs improved outcome, exploration, sharing, and group rapport. These participants integrated more of their partner's ideas into their own subsequent designs, explored a more divergent set of ideas, and provided more productive critiques of their partner's designs. Furthermore, their ads were rated more highly and garnered a higher click-through rate when hosted online.

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Dow, Steven, Kulkarni, Anand, Bunge, Brie, Nguyen, Truc, Klemmer, Scott and Hartmann, Bjorn (2011): Shepherding the crowd: managing and providing feedback to crowd workers. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1669-1674. Available online

Micro-task platforms provide a marketplace for hiring people to do short-term work for small payments. Requesters often struggle to obtain high-quality results, especially on content-creation tasks, because work cannot be easily verified and workers can move to other tasks without consequence. Such platforms provide little opportunity for workers to reflect and improve their task performance. Timely and task-specific feedback can help crowd workers learn, persist, and produce better results. We analyze the design space for crowd feedback and introduce Shepherd, a prototype system for visualizing crowd work, providing feedback, and promoting workers into shepherding roles. This paper describes our current progress and our plans for system development and evaluation.

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Dow, Steven, MacIntyre, Blair and Mateas, Michael (2008): Styles of play in immersive and interactive story: case studies from a gallery installation of AR Façade. In: Inakage, Masa and Cheok, Adrian David (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2008 December 3-5, 2008, Yokohama, Japan. pp. 373-380. Available online

2007
 
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Dow, Steven, Mehta, Manish, Harmon, Ellie, MacIntyre, Blair and Mateas, Michael (2007): Presence and engagement in an interactive drama. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1475-1484. Available online

In this paper we present the results of a qualitative, empirical study exploring the impact of immersive technologies on presence and engagement, using the interactive drama Faade as the object of study. In this drama, players are situated in a married couple's apartment, and interact primarily through conversation with the characters and manipulation of objects in the space. We present participants' experiences across three different versions of Faade -- augmented reality (AR) and two desktop computing based implementations, one where players communicate using speech and the other using typed keyboard input. Through interviews and observations of players, we find that immersive AR can create an increased sense of presence, confirming generally held expectations. However, we demonstrate that increased presence does not necessarily lead to more engagement. Rather, mediation may be necessary for some players to fully engage with certain interactive media experiences.

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dow, Steven (2007): User engagement in physically embodied narrative experiences. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2007, Washington DC, USA. p. 280. Available online

 
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Dow, Steven, Mehta, Manish, MacIntyre, Blair and Mateas, Michael (2007): AR façade: an augmented reality interactve drama. In: Majumder, Aditi, Hodges, Larry F., Cohen-Or, Daniel and Spencer, Stephen N. (eds.) VRST 2007 - Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology November 5-7, 2007, Newport Beach, California, USA. pp. 215-216. Available online

2006
 
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Dow, Steven, Saponas, T. Scott, Li, Yang and Landay, James A. (2006): External representations in ubiquitous computing design and the implications for design tools. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 241-250. Available online

One challenge for ubiquitous computing is providing appropriate tools for professional designers, thus leading to stronger user-valued applications. Unlike many previous tool-builders' attempts to support a specific technology, we take a designer-centered stance, asking the question: how do professional designers externalize ideas for off-the-desktop computing and how do these inform next generation design tools? We report on interviews with designers from various domains, including experience, interaction, industrial, and space designers. The study broadly reveals perceived challenges of moving into a non-traditional design medium, emphasizes the practice of storytelling for relating the context of interaction, and through two case studies, traces the use of various external representations during the design progression of ubicomp applications. Using paperprototyped "walkthroughs" centered on two common design representations (storyboards and physical simulations), we formed a deeper understanding of issues influencing tool development. We offer guidelines for builders of future ubicomp tools, especially early-stage conceptual tools for professional designers to prototype applications across multiple sensors, displays, and physical environments.

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dow, Steven, Mehta, Manish, Lausier, Annie, MacIntyre, Blair and Mateas, Michael (2006): Initial lessons from AR Faade, an interactive augmented reality drama. In: Ishii, Hiroshi, Lee, Newton, Natkin, Stphane and Tsushima, Katsuhide (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2006 June 14-16, 2006, Hollywood, California, USA. p. 28. Available online

2005
 
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Dow, Steven, Lee, Jaemin, Oezbek, Christopher, MacIntyre, Blair, Bolter, Jay David and Gandy, Maribeth (2005): Wizard of Oz interfaces for mixed reality applications. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1339-1342. Available online

One important tool for developing complex interactive applications is "Wizard of Oz "(WOz)simulation. WOz simulation allows design concepts,content and partially completed applications to be tested on users without the need to first create a completely working system. In this paper we discuss the integration of wizard interface tools into a Mixed Reality (MR)design environment and show how easier creation and evolution of wizard interfaces can lead to an expanded role for WOz-based testing during the design evolution of MR experiences. We share our experiences designing an audio experience in an historic site,and illustrate the evolution of the wizard interfaces alongside the user experience

© All rights reserved Dow et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Gandy, Maribeth, MacIntyre, Blair, Presti, Peter, Dow, Steven, Bolter, Jay David, Yarbrough, Brandon and O'Rear, Nigel (2005): AR Karaoke: Acting in Your Favorite Scenes. In: Fourth IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2005 5-8 October, 2005, Vienna, Austria. pp. 114-117. Available online

 
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Dow, Steven, Lee, Jaemin, Oezbek, Christopher, MacIntyre, Blair, Bolter, Jay David and Gandy, Maribeth (2005): Exploring spatial narratives and mixed reality experiences in Oakland Cemetery. In: Lee, Newton (ed.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2005 June 15-15, 2005, Valencia, Spain. pp. 51-60. Available online

 
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Dow, Steven, MacIntyre, Blair, Lee, Jaemin, Oezbek, Christopher, Bolter, Jay David and Gandy, Maribeth (2005): Wizard of Oz support throughout an iterative design process. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 18-26. Available online

2004
 
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MacIntyre, Blair, Gandy, Maribeth, Dow, Steven and Bolter, Jay David (2004): DART: a toolkit for rapid design exploration of augmented reality experiences. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 197-206. Available online

In this paper, we describe The Designer\'s Augmented Reality Toolkit (DART). DART is built on top of Macromedia Director, a widely used multimedia development environment. We summarize the most significant problems faced by designers working with AR in the real world, and discuss how DART addresses them. Most of DART is implemented in an interpreted scripting language, and can be modified by designers to suit their needs. Our work focuses on supporting early design activities, especially a rapid transition from story-boards to working experience, so that the experiential part of a design can be tested early and often. DART allows designers to specify complex relationships between the physical and virtual worlds, and supports 3D animatic actors (informal, sketch-based content) in addition to more polished content. Designers can capture and replay synchronized video and sensor data, allowing them to work off-site and to test specific parts of their experience more effectively.

© All rights reserved MacIntyre et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Gandy, Maribeth, MacIntyre, Blair and Dow, Steven (2004): Making Tracking Technology Accessible in a Rapid Prototyping Environment. In: 3rd IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2004 2-5 November, 2004, Arlington, VA, USA. pp. 282-283. Available online

2003
 
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MacIntyre, Blair, Gandy, Maribeth, Bolter, Jay David, Dow, Steven and Hannigan, Brendan (2003): DART: The Designer's Augmented Reality Toolkit. In: 2003 IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2003 7-10 October, 2003, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 329-330. Available online

 
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