Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2009
Pub. count:36
Number of co-authors:34



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Matt Jones:11
David Bainbridge:5
Andy Cockburn:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steve Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ian H. Witten:82
Andy Cockburn:68
Matt Jones:63
 
 
 
Jul 22

... in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.

-- Herbert Simon in "Computers, Communications and the Public Interest," 1971

 
 

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Steve Jones

Personal Homepage:
cs.waikato.ac.nz/~stevej/

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Publications by Steve Jones (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Schweer, Andrea, Jones, Steve and Hinze, Annika (2009): Trails of experiences: navigating personal memories. In: Proceedings of CHINZ09, the ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapters International Conference on Computer-Human Interaction 2009. pp. 105-106.

Systems to augment personal information aim to support people in remembering both past experiences and specific information associated with past experiences. These types of information go beyond those supported in systems for Personal Information Management, making it necessary to develop new user interface and interaction techniques. Our approach is based on characteristics of human memory. Its major contribution is the combination of a graph-based data model with navigation mechanisms based on various types of context and on associations.

© All rights reserved Schweer et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Bainbridge, David, Jones, Steve, McIntosh, Sam, Jones, Matt and Witten, Ian H. (2008): Portable digital libraries on an iPod. In: JCDL08 Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. pp. 333-336.

This paper describes the facilities we built to run a self-contained digital library on an iPod. The digital library software used was the open source package Greenstone, and the paper highlights the technical problems that were encountered and solved. It attempts to convey a feeling for the kind of issues that must be faced when adapting standard DL software for non-standard, leading-edge devices.

© All rights reserved Bainbridge et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bainbridge, David, Jones, Steve, McIntosh, Sam, Jones, Matt and Witten, Ian H. (2008): Running Greenstone on an iPod. In: JCDL08 Proceedings of the 8th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2008. p. 419.

The open source digital library software Greenstone is demonstrated running on an iPod. The standalone configuration supports browsing, searching and displaying documents in a range of media formats. Plugged in to a host computer (Mac, Linux, or Windows), the exact same facilities are made available to the world through a built-in web server.

© All rights reserved Bainbridge et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Matt, Jones, Steve, Bradley, Gareth, Warren, Nigel, Bainbridge, David and Holmes, Geoff (2008): ONTRACK: Dynamically adapting music playback to support navigation. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (7) pp. 513-525.

2006
 
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Jones, Matt and Jones, Steve (2006): The music is the message. In Interactions, 13 (4) pp. 24-27.

 
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Patel, Dynal, Marsden, Gary, Jones, Matt and Jones, Steve (2006): Improving photo searching interfaces for small-screen mobile computers. In: Proceedings of 8th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2006. pp. 149-156.

In this paper, we conduct a thorough investigation of how people search their photo collections for events (a set of photographs relating to a particular well defined event), singles (individual photographs) and properties (a set of photographs with a common theme) on PDAs. We describe a prototype system that allows us to expose many issues that must be considered when designing photo searching interfaces. We discuss each of these issues and make recommendations where applicable. Our major observation is that several different methods are used to locate photographs. In light of this, we conclude by discussing how photo searching interfaces might embody or support such an approach.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Patel, Dynal, Marsden, Gary, Jones, Matt and Jones, Steve (2006): Improving photo searching interfaces for small-screen mobile computers. In: Nieminen, Marko and Röykkee, Mika (eds.) Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2006 September 12-15, 2006, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 149-156.

 
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Crestani, Fabio, Dunlop, Mark D., Jones, Matt, Jones, Steve and Mizzaro, Stefano (2006): Theme issue on interactive mobile information access. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 10 (4) pp. 193-194.

2005
 
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Jones, Steve, Jones, Matt, Marsden, Gary, Patel, Dynal and Cockburn, Andy (2005): An evaluation of integrated zooming and scrolling on small screens. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 63 (3) pp. 271-303.

Speed-dependent automatic zooming (SDAZ) has been proposed for standard desktop displays as a means of overcoming problems associated with the navigation of large information spaces. SDAZ combines zooming and panning facilities into a single operation, with the magnitude of both factors dependent on simple user interaction. Previous research indicated dramatic user performance improvements when using the technique for document and map navigation tasks. In this paper, we propose algorithmic extensions to the technique for application on small-screen devices and present a comparative experimental evaluation of user performance with the system and a normative scroll-zoom-pan interface. Users responded positively to the system, particularly in relation to reduced physical navigational workload. However, the reduced screen space reduced the impact of SDAZ in comparison to that reported in previous studies. In fact, for one-dimensional navigation (vertical document navigation) the normative interface out-performed SDAZ. For navigation in two dimensions (map browsing) SDAZ supports more accurate target location, and also produces longer task completion times. Some SDAZ users became lost within the information space and were unable to recover navigational context. We discuss the reasons for these observations and suggest ways in which limitations of SDAZ in the small-screen context may be overcome.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Warren, Nigel, Jones, Matt, Jones, Steve and Bainbridge, David (2005): Navigation via continuously adapted music. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1849-1852.

Listening to music on personal, digital devices while mobile is an enjoyable, everyday activity. We explore a scheme for exploiting this practice to immerse listeners in navigation cues. Our prototype, Ontrack, continuously adapts audio, modifying the spatial balance and volume to lead listeners to their target destination. An initial lab-based evaluation has demonstrated the approach's efficacy: users were able to complete tasks within a reasonable time and their subjective feedback was positive. Encouraged by these findings, we are building a pocket-sized prototype for further testing.

© All rights reserved Warren et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Krishnan, Aparna and Jones, Steve (2005): TimeSpace: activity-based temporal visualisation of personal information spaces. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 9 (1) pp. 46-65.

 
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Jones, Steve and Johnson-Yale, Camille (2005): Professors online: The Internet's impact on college faculty. In First Monday, 10 (9) .

2004
 
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Patel, Dynal, Marsden, Gary, Jones, Steve and Jones, Matt (2004): An Evaluation of Techniques for Browsing Photograph Collections on Small Displays. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 132-143.

 
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Masoodian, Masood, Jones, Steve and Rogers, Bill (eds.) Computer Human Interaction 6th Asia Pacific Conference - APCHI 2004 June 29 - July 2, 2004, Rotorua, New Zealand.

 
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Jones, Steve, Jones, Matt and Deo, Shaleen (2004): Using keyphrases as search result surrogates on small screen devices. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (1) pp. 55-68.

2002
 
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Jones, Steve and Paynter, Gordon W. (2002): Automatic extraction of document keyphrases for use in digital libraries: Evaluation and applications. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53 (8) pp. 653-677.

 
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Jones, Steve, Lundy, Stephen and Paynter, Gordon W. (2002): Interactive Document Summarisation Using Automatically Extracted Keyphrases. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 101.

 
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Johnson, Andrew E., Leigh, Jason, Carter, Bryan, Sosnoski, Jim and Jones, Steve (2002): Virtual Harlem. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 22 (5) pp. 61-67.

2001
 
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Jones, Steve and Paynter, Gordon W. (2001): Human Evaluation of Kea, An Automatic Keyphrasing System. In: JCDL01: Proceedings of the 1st ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2001. pp. 148-156.

This paper describes an evaluation of the Kea automatic keyphrase extraction algorithm. Tools that automatically identify keyphrases are desirable because document keyphrases have numerous applications in digital library systems, but are costly and time consuming to manually assign. Keyphrase extraction algorithms are usually evaluated by comparison to author-specified keywords, but this methodology has several well-known shortcomings. The results presented in this paper are based on subjective evaluations of the quality and appropriateness of keyphrases by human assessors, and make a number of contributions. First, they validate previous evaluations of Kea that rely on author keywords. Second, they show Kea's performance is comparable to that of similar systems that have been evaluated by human assessors. Finally, they justify the use of author keyphrases as a performance metric by showing that authors generally choose good keywords.

© All rights reserved Jones and Paynter and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Jones, Steve and Thomas, Peter J. (1999): Nationality as a Factor in the Use of Information Management Technologies. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 18 (4) pp. 231-233.

In an attempt to uncover various non-technical and behavioural issues relating to the adoption of personal information management (PIM) technologies, an exploratory study was conducted into cultural and nationality factors in the usage of such artefacts. This investigation assessed such usage among two sample groups, comparable on multiple sociodemographic and occupational factors, but situated within historically diverse nations-those of the UK, and the only recently democratized state of the Czech Republic. Particular attention was paid to any differences in the use of 'traditional' paper based as opposed to 'emerging' electronic technologies. The findings suggest that, whilst there was no significant difference in the usage of electronic items between the Czech and UK subjects, a nationality effect was observed in the use of traditional items, this being particularly pronounced in the case of two specific artefacts when taking the use of individual items into account.

© All rights reserved Jones and Thomas and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Jones, Steve and Paynter, Gordon (1999): Topic-Based Browsing within a Digital Library using Keyphrases. In: DL99: Proceedings of the 4th ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1999. pp. 114-121.

 
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Jones, Steve and Staveley, Mark S. (1999): Phrasier: A System for Interactive Document Retrieval using Keyphrases. In: Proceedings of the 22nd Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 1999. pp. 160-167.

 
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Witten, Ian H., McNab, Rodger J., Jones, Steve, Apperley, Mark, Bainbridge, David and Cunningham, Sally Jo (1999): Managing Complexity in a Distributed Digital Library. In IEEE Computer, 32 (2) pp. 74-79.

1998
 
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Jones, Steve (1998): Graphical Query Specification and Dynamic Result Previews for a Digital Library. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 143-151.

Textual query languages based on Boolean logic are common amongst the search facilities of on-line information repositories. However, there is evidence to suggest that the syntactic and semantic demands of such languages lead to user errors and adversely affect the time that it takes users to form queries. Additionally, users are faced with user interfaces to these repositories which are unresponsive and uninformative, and consequently fail to support effective query refinement. We suggest that graphical query languages, particularly Venn-like diagrams, provide a natural medium for Boolean query specification which overcomes the problems of textual query languages. Also, dynamic result previews can be seamlessly integrated with graphical query specification to increase the effectiveness of query refinements. We describe VQuery, a query interface to the New Zealand Digital Library which exploits querying by Venn diagrams and integrated query result previews.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Steve (1998): Dynamic Query Result Previews for a Digital Library. In: DL98: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1998. pp. 291-292.

Previous models of dynamic querying supported by query previews have focussed on attribute based querying, have required information providers to create preview tables, and have provided little information to support initial query refinement. We present an alternative model that has been implemented for the New Zealand Digital Library, and describe the system architecture and user interface.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Steve, Cunningham, Sally Jo and McNab, Rodger (1998): Usage Analysis of a Digital Library. In: DL98: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1998. pp. 293-294.

We analyse transaction logs for a large full-text document collection for Computer Science researchers. We report insights gained from this analysis and identify resulting search interface design issues.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Steve (1998): Philosophical Perspectives on Computer-Mediated Communication, by Charles Ess (Ed.). In The Information Society, 14 (2) .

1997
 
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Jones, Steve and Thomas, Peter J. (1997): Empirical Assessment of Individuals' 'Personal Information Management Systems'. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 16 (3) pp. 158-160.

A simple pilot study has been undertaken to investigate the use of 'personal information management technologies' (including both traditional and emerging electronic technologies) via a combination of nominal questionnaire and semi-structured interview schedules. The pilot study suggested that the number of users adopting computer-based personal information management technologies is low, as is the combination of computer-based technologies with traditional paper-based technologies in users' 'personal information management systems'.

© All rights reserved Jones and Thomas and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Jones, Steve and Marsh, Steve (1997): Human-Computer-Human Interaction: Trust in CSCW. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (3) pp. 36-40.

We suggest that trust is a key factor in the efficacy of both intra-group and inter-group activities, and that it can be formalised and then exploited in the design and analysis of CSCW systems. We call our formal description Trust in order to differentiate it from wider definitions. Potential uses of Trust in a group work context include the following: * it can be used as a tool for the discussion of the design of CSCW systems; * it can be embedded in computer systems to mediate cooperative computer based activities; * it can be used to record and analyze group activity; * it provides a tool for the discussion and clarification of trust, and its role in group activities. The development of the formalism addresses the need for support beyond technical issues for designers involved in the development of multi-user-centered systems.

© All rights reserved Jones and Marsh and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Steve (1997): Using the News: An Examination of the Value and Use of News Sources in CMC. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 2 (4) .

1996
 
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Jones, Steve and Cockburn, Andy (1996): A Study of Navigational Support Provided by Two World Wide Web Browsing Applications. In: Hypertext 96 - Proceedings of the Seventh ACM Conference on Hypertext March 16-20, 1996, Washington, DC. pp. 161-169.

This paper describes a usability study of the Hypertext navigation facilities provided by two popular World Wide Web client applications (also termed 'browsers'). We detail the navigation tools provided by the clients and describe their underlying page retrieval models. We introduce a notation that represents the system states resulting from the user's navigation actions in World Wide Web subspaces. The notation is used to analyse the client applications. We find that the client user interfaces present a model of navigation that conflicts with the underlying stack-based system model. A small usability study was carried out to investigate the effects of the clients' browser behaviour on users. The study reveals that users have incorrect models of their navigation support, and they have little confidence in the application of their models when using the clients. The paper concludes with a description of future work and a discussion of implications for WWW page and client designers.

© All rights reserved Jones and Cockburn and/or ACM Press

 
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Cockburn, Andy and Jones, Steve (1996): Which Way Now? Analysing and Easing Inadequacies in WWW Navigation. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 45 (1) pp. 105-129.

This paper examines the usability of the hypertext navigation facilities provided by World Wide Web client applications. A notation is defined to represent the user's navigational acts and the resultant system states. The notation is used to report potential, or "theoretical" problems in the models of navigation supported by three web client applications. A usability study confirms that these problems emerge in actual use, and demonstrates that incorrect user models of the clients' facilities are common. A usability analysis identifies inadequacies in the clients' interfaces. Motivated by the analysis of usability problems, we propose extensions to the design of WWW client applications. These proposals are demonstrated by our system WEBNET which uses dynamic graphical overview diagrams to extend the navigational facilities of conventional World Wide Web client applications. Related work on graphical overview diagrams for web navigation is reviewed.

© All rights reserved Cockburn and Jones and/or Academic Press

1995
 
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Cockburn, Andy and Jones, Steve (1995): Four Principles of Groupware Design. In Interacting with Computers, 7 (2) pp. 195-210.

Groupware design is at a stage where identification, clarification and validation of best practice is critical if its potential is to be realised. The paper examines and records the major causes of groupware failure, and provides four groupware design principles that encapsulate the problems and guide design teams around them. The principles provide an extendable framework that is a synthesis of design lessons recorded in CSCW literature.

© All rights reserved Cockburn and Jones and/or Elsevier Science

1994
 
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Cockburn, Andy and Jones, Steve (1994): Four Principles for Groupware Design. In: Proceedings of OZCHI94, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1994. pp. 21-26.

Participatory design amalgamates the expertise of interdisciplinary specialists with the task-specific expertise of end-users. Groupware design is widely recognised as benefiting from participative approaches. Recognition of this ideal, however, does not preclude the failure of groupware design due to poor communication and inadequate understanding. This paper provides a grounding in the problems affecting groupware's success, and introduces four design principles. These principles guide all those involved in design around the pitfalls that have been encountered, some repeatedly, by groupware.

© All rights reserved Cockburn and Jones and/or Ergonomics Society of Australia

 
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Jones, Steve (1994): Identification and use of guidelines for the design of computer supported collaborative writing tools. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 3 (3) pp. 379-404.

As groupware and workflow technologies become widely accepted, it is important to identify and clarify best practice at all stages of the development of those systems. One approach to the promulgation of best practice is to develop clear and effective guidelines for application in system development.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

1992
 
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Jones, Steve (1992): Designing Computer Systems to Support Collaborating Authors. In: Proceedings of OZCHI92, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1992. pp. 134-141.

Authors who collaborate via a computer are faced with a variety of problems concerning both the processes of writing and collaboration. This paper is concerned with reducing the scale and number of those problems. It discusses the applicability of models of writing to the design of collaborative authoring tools, and highlights the difficulties authors currently face with the use of such tools. New principles for the design of groupware are proposed and a novel collaborative authoring tool, MILO, is described. Conclusions are drawn about the development of such tools.

© All rights reserved Jones and/or ACM Press

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/steve_jones.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2009
Pub. count:36
Number of co-authors:34



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Matt Jones:11
David Bainbridge:5
Andy Cockburn:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steve Jones's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ian H. Witten:82
Andy Cockburn:68
Matt Jones:63
 
 
 
Jul 22

... in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.

-- Herbert Simon in "Computers, Communications and the Public Interest," 1971

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!