Publication statistics

Pub. period:2001-2011
Pub. count:17
Number of co-authors:57



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Shahram Izadi:9
Alex Butler:7
Nicolas Villar:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steve Hodges's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Abigail Sellen:81
Bill Buxton:78
Shahram Izadi:50
 
 
 
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Steve Hodges

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Publications by Steve Hodges (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Badshah, Akash, Gupta, Sidhant, Cohn, Gabe, Villar, Nicolas, Hodges, Steve and Patel, Shwetak N. (2011): Interactive generator: a self-powered haptic feedback device. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2051-2054.

We present Interactive Generator (InGen), a self-powered wireless rotary input device capable of generating haptic or force feedback without the need for any external power source. Our approach uses a modified servomotor to perform three functions: (1) generating power for wireless communication and embedded electronics, (2) sensing the direction and speed of rotation, and (3) providing force feedback during rotation. While InGen is rotating, the device is capable of providing the sensation of detents or bumps, changes in stiffness, and abrupt stops using only power that is harvested during interaction. We describe the device in detail, demonstrate an initial 'TV remote control' application, and end with a discussion of our experiences developing the prototype and application. To the best of our knowledge, InGen is the first self-powered device, which also provides haptic feedback during operation. More broadly, this work demonstrates a new class of input systems that uses human-generated power to provide feedback to the user and wirelessly communicate sensed information.

© All rights reserved Badshah et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Gong, Nan-Wei, Hodges, Steve and Paradiso, Joseph A. (2011): Leveraging conductive inkjet technology to build a scalable and versatile surface for ubiquitous sensing. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 45-54.

In this paper we describe the design and implementation of a new versatile, scalable and cost-effective sensate surface. The system is based on a new conductive inkjet technology, which allows capacitive sensor electrodes and different types of RF antennas to be cheaply printed onto a roll of flexible substrate that may be many meters long. By deploying this surface on (or under) a floor it is possible to detect the presence and whereabouts of users through both passive and active capacitive coupling schemes. We have also incorporated GSM and NFC electromagnetic radiation sensing and piezoelectric pressure and vibration detection. We report on a number of experiments which evaluate sensing performance based on a 2.5m x 0.3m hardware test-bed. We describe some potential applications for this technology and highlight a number of improvements we have in mind.

© All rights reserved Gong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Izadi, Shahram, Kim, David, Hilliges, Otmar, Molyneaux, David, Newcombe, Richard, Kohli, Pushmeet, Shotton, Jamie, Hodges, Steve, Freeman, Dustin, Davison, Andrew and Fitzgibbon, Andrew (2011): KinectFusion: real-time 3D reconstruction and interaction using a moving depth camera. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 559-568.

KinectFusion enables a user holding and moving a standard Kinect camera to rapidly create detailed 3D reconstructions of an indoor scene. Only the depth data from Kinect is used to track the 3D pose of the sensor and reconstruct, geometrically precise, 3D models of the physical scene in real-time. The capabilities of KinectFusion, as well as the novel GPU-based pipeline are described in full. Uses of the core system for low-cost handheld scanning, and geometry-aware augmented reality and physics-based interactions are shown. Novel extensions to the core GPU pipeline demonstrate object segmentation and user interaction directly in front of the sensor, without degrading camera tracking or reconstruction. These extensions are used to enable real-time multi-touch interactions anywhere, allowing any planar or non-planar reconstructed physical surface to be appropriated for touch.

© All rights reserved Izadi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butler, Alex, Hilliges, Otmar, Izadi, Shahram, Hodges, Steve, Molyneaux, David, Kim, David and Kong, Danny (2011): Vermeer: direct interaction with a 360° viewable 3D display. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 569-576.

We present Vermeer, a novel interactive 360 viewable 3D display. Like prior systems in this area, Vermeer provides viewpoint-corrected, stereoscopic 3D graphics to simultaneous users, 360 around the display, without the need for eyewear or other user instrumentation. Our goal is to over-come an issue inherent in these prior systems which -- typically due to moving parts -- restrict interactions to outside the display volume. Our system leverages a known optical illusion to demonstrate, for the first time, how users can reach into and directly touch 3D objects inside the display volume. Vermeer is intended to be a new enabling technology for interaction, and we therefore describe our hardware implementation in full, focusing on the challenges of combining this optical configuration with an existing approach for creating a 360 viewable 3D display. Initially we demonstrate direct involume interaction by sensing user input with a Kinect camera placed above the display. However, by exploiting the properties of the optical configuration, we also demonstrate novel prototypes for fully integrated input sensing alongside simultaneous display. We conclude by discussing limitations, implications for interaction, and ideas for future work.

© All rights reserved Butler et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Villar, Nicolas and Hodges, Steve (2009): The peppermill: a human-powered user interface device. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 29-32.

A human-powered user interface device sources its power from the physical effort required to operate it. This paper describes a technique by which a geared DC motor and a simple circuit can be used to enable interaction-powered rotary input devices. When turned, the circuit provides a temporary power source for an embedded device, and doubles as a sensor that provides information about the direction and rate of input. As a proof of concept, we have developed a general-purpose wireless input device -- called the Peppermill -- and illustrate its capabilities by using it as a remote control for a multimedia-browsing application.

© All rights reserved Villar and Hodges and/or their publisher

 
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Villar, Nicolas and Hodges, Steve (2009): The peppermill: a human-powered user interface device. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2009. pp. 29-32.

A human-powered user interface device sources its power from the physical effort required to operate it. This paper describes a technique by which a geared DC motor and a simple circuit can be used to enable interaction-powered rotary input devices. When turned, the circuit provides a temporary power source for an embedded device, and doubles as a sensor that provides information about the direction and rate of input. As a proof of concept, we have developed a general-purpose wireless input device -- called the Peppermill -- and illustrate its capabilities by using it as a remote control for a multimedia-browsing application.

© All rights reserved Villar and Hodges and/or their publisher

 
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Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Rosenfeld, Dan, Benko, Hrvoje, Helmes, John, Westhues, Jonathan, Hodges, Steve, Ofek, Eyal, Butler, Alex, Cao, Xiang and Chen, Billy (2009): Mouse 2.0: multi-touch meets the mouse. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 33-42.

In this paper we present novel input devices that combine the standard capabilities of a computer mouse with multi-touch sensing. Our goal is to enrich traditional pointer-based desktop interactions with touch and gestures. To chart the design space, we present five different multi-touch mouse implementations. Each explores a different touch sensing strategy, which leads to differing form-factors and hence interactive possibilities. In addition to the detailed description of hardware and software implementations of our prototypes, we discuss the relative strengths, limitations and affordances of these novel input devices as informed by the results of a preliminary user study.

© All rights reserved Villar et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Izadi, Shahram, Wilson, Andrew D., Hodges, Steve, Garcia-Mendoza, Armando and Butz, Andreas (2009): Interactions in the air: adding further depth to interactive tabletops. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 139-148.

Although interactive surfaces have many unique and compelling qualities, the interactions they support are by their very nature bound to the display surface. In this paper we present a technique for users to seamlessly switch between interacting on the tabletop surface to above it. Our aim is to leverage the space above the surface in combination with the regular tabletop display to allow more intuitive manipulation of digital content in three-dimensions. Our goal is to design a technique that closely resembles the ways we manipulate physical objects in the real-world; conceptually, allowing virtual objects to be 'picked up' off the tabletop surface in order to manipulate their three dimensional position or orientation. We chart the evolution of this technique, implemented on two rear projection-vision tabletops. Both use special projection screen materials to allow sensing at significant depths beyond the display. Existing and new computer vision techniques are used to sense hand gestures and postures above the tabletop, which can be used alongside more familiar multi-touch interactions. Interacting above the surface in this way opens up many interesting challenges. In particular it breaks the direct interaction metaphor that most tabletops afford. We present a novel shadow-based technique to help alleviate this issue. We discuss the strengths and limitations of our technique based on our own observations and initial user feedback, and provide various insights from comparing, and contrasting, our tabletop implementations.

© All rights reserved Hilliges et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Izadi, Shahram, Butler, Alex, Hodges, Steve, West, Darren, Hall, Malcolm, Buxton, Bill and Molloy, Mike (2008): Experiences with building a thin form-factor touch and tangible tabletop. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 181-184.

 
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Butler, Alex, Izadi, Shahram and Hodges, Steve (2008): SideSight: multi-"touch" interaction around small devices. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 201-204.

 
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Izadi, Shahram, Hodges, Steve, Taylor, Stuart, Rosenfeld, Dan, Villar, Nicolas, Butler, Alex and Westhues, Jonathan (2008): Going beyond the display: a surface technology with an electronically switchable diffuser. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 269-278.

2007
 
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Sellen, Abigail, Fogg, Andrew, Aitken, Mike, Hodges, Steve, Rother, Carsten and Wood, Kenneth R. (2007): Do life-logging technologies support memory for the past?: an experimental study using sensecam. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 81-90.

We report on the results of a study using SenseCam, a "life-logging" technology in the form of a wearable camera, which aims to capture data about everyday life in order to support people's memory for past, personal events. We find evidence that SenseCam images do facilitate people's ability to connect to their past, but that images do this in different ways. We make a distinction between "remembering" the past, and "knowing" about it, and provide evidence that SenseCam images work differently over time in these capacities. We also compare the efficacy of user-captured images with automatically captured images and discuss the implications of these findings and others for how we conceive of and make claims about life-logging technologies.

© All rights reserved Sellen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hodges, Steve, Izadi, Shahram, Butler, Alex, Rrustemi, Alban and Buxton, Bill (2007): ThinSight: versatile multi-touch sensing for thin form-factor displays. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 7-10, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 259-268.

ThinSight is a novel optical sensing system, fully integrated into a thin form factor display, capable of detecting multi-ple fingers placed on or near the display surface. We describe this new hardware in detail, and demonstrate how it can be embedded behind a regular LCD, allowing sensing without degradation of display capability. With our approach, fingertips and hands are clearly identifiable through the display. The approach of optical sensing also opens up the exciting possibility for detecting other physical objects and visual markers through the display, and some initial experiments are described. We also discuss other novel capabilities of our system: interaction at a distance using IR pointing devices, and IR-based communication with other electronic devices through the display. A major advantage of ThinSight over existing camera and projector based optical systems is its compact, thin form-factor making such systems even more deployable. We therefore envisage using ThinSight to capture rich sensor data through the display which can be processed using computer vision techniques to enable both multi-touch and tangible interaction.

© All rights reserved Hodges et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hodges, Steve, Thorne, Alan, Mallinson, Hugo and Floerkemeier, Christian (2007): Assessing and Optimizing the Range of UHF RFID to Enable Real-World Pervasive Computing Applications. In: LaMarca, Anthony, Langheinrich, Marc and Truong, Khai N. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2007 - Pervasive Computing 5th International Conference May 13-16, 2007, Toronto, Canada. pp. 280-297.

2006
 
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Taylor, Alex S., Swan, Laurel, Eardley, Rachel, Sellen, Abigail, Hodges, Steve and Wood, Kenneth R. (2006): Augmenting refrigerator magnets: why less is sometimes more. In: Proceedings of the Fourth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 115-124.

In this paper we present a number of augmented refrigerator magnet concepts. The concepts are shown to be derived from previous research into the everyday use of fridge surfaces. Three broadly encompassing practices have been addressed through the concepts: (i) organization/planning in households; (ii) reminding; and (iii) methods household members use to assign ownership to particular tasks, activities and artifacts. Particular emphasis is given to a design approach that aims to build on the simplicity of magnets so that each of the concepts offers a basic, simple to operate function. The concepts, and our use of what we call this less is more design sensibility are examined using a low-fidelity prototyping exercise. The results of this preliminary work suggest that the concepts have the potential to be easily incorporated into household routines and that the design of simple functioning devices lends itself to this.

© All rights reserved Taylor et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hodges, Steve, Williams, Lyndsay, Berry, Emma, Izadi, Shahram, Srinivasan, James, Butler, Alex, Smyth, Gavin, Kapur, Narinder and Wood, Kenneth R. (2006): SenseCam: A Retrospective Memory Aid. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 177-193.

2001
 
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Addlesee, Mike, Curwen, Rupert W., Hodges, Steve, Newman, Joseph, Steggles, Pete, Ward, Andy and Hopper, Andy (2001): Implementing a Sentient Computing System. In IEEE Computer, 34 (8) pp. 50-56.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
24 Aug 2009: Modified
12 Jul 2009: Modified
12 Jul 2009: Modified
01 Jun 2009: Modified
30 May 2009: Modified
29 May 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
22 Jun 2007: Modified
19 Jun 2007: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/steve_hodges.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2001-2011
Pub. count:17
Number of co-authors:57



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Shahram Izadi:9
Alex Butler:7
Nicolas Villar:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Steve Hodges's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Abigail Sellen:81
Bill Buxton:78
Shahram Izadi:50
 
 
 
Jul 11

Creative without strategy is called ‘art‘. Creative with strategy is called ‘advertising‘

-- Jef I. Richards

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!