Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2005
Pub. count:5
Number of co-authors:3



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Chris Schmandt:3
Hiroshi Ishii:2
Kimiko Ryokai:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Stefan Marti's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hiroshi Ishii:111
Chris Schmandt:40
Kimiko Ryokai:21
 
 
 

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Stefan Marti

Ph.D.

Picture of Stefan Marti.
Personal Homepage:
http://www.stefanmarti.com

Current place of employment:
Samsung Electronics

Stefan Marti is an HCI researcher and project leader working on computer-mediated communication, software and hardware agents, robotics, artificial intelligence, ubiquitous computing and sensor networks. In 2005 he received his PhD in Media Arts and Sciences from MIT with his dissertation titled "Autonomous Interactive Intermediaries: Social Intelligence for Mobile Communication Agents."

From 1997 to 2005, he worked on mobile communication devices and spoken language systems at the MIT Media Lab's Speech Interface Group (where he was an AT&T Fellow 1998/99, and Motorola Fellow 1999/2000). His approach includes software and robotic agents to enhance user interfaces. His most recent projects focus on adding human-style social intelligence to mobile communication agents that are implemented both in the robotics and spoken language domain. His prototype system includes a dual conversational agent, a body-worn sensor network, and wireless animatronic devices (one of them the "Cellular Squirrel"). His past work includes autonomously hovering micro helicopters and personal laser projectors.

For his Master's degree in Media Arts and Sciences at MIT, he developed "Active Messenger," an Intermediary for email filtering and mobile delivery. From 1985 to 1993, he studied at the University of Bern, Switzerland, and received a Master's degree in Psychology, Philosophy, and Computer Science with his thesis titled "The Psychological Impact of Modern Communication technologies on Users."

His additional research interests include human interaction with autonomous entities and agents with commonsense reasoning. In an earlier life, he was a video editor at the Swiss national television station and sound engineer for live concerts and rock bands for over a dozen years.

He is currently working for Samsung's Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), which is the Samsung Group's central R&D research facility.

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Publications by Stefan Marti (bibliography)

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2005
 
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Marti, Stefan and Schmandt, Chris (2005): Physical embodiments for mobile communication agents. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 231-240.

This paper describes a physically embodied and animated user interface to an interactive call handling agent, consisting of a small wireless animatronic device in the form of a squirrel, bunny, or parrot. A software tool creates movement primitives, composes these primitives into complex behaviors, and triggers these behaviors dynamically at state changes in the conversational agent\'s finite state machine. Gaze and gestural cues from the animatronics alert both the user and co-located third parties of incoming phone calls, and data suggests that such alerting is less intrusive than conventional telephones.

© All rights reserved Marti and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Ryokai, Kimiko, Marti, Stefan and Ishii, Hiroshi (2005): Designing the world as your palette. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1037-1049.

"The World as your Palette" is our ongoing effort to design and develop tools to allow artists to create visual art projects with elements (specifically, the color, texture, and moving patterns) extracted directly from their personal objects and their immediate environment. Our tool called "I/O Brush" looks like a regular physical paintbrush, but contains a video camera, lights, and touch sensors. Outside of the drawing canvas, the brush can pick up colors, textures, and movements of a brushed surface. On the canvas, artists can draw with the special "ink" they just picked up from their immediate environment. We describe the evolution and development of our system, from kindergarten classrooms to an art museum, as well as the reactions of our users to the growing expressive capabilities of our brush, as an iterative design process.

© All rights reserved Ryokai et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Marti, Stefan and Schmandt, Chris (2005): Giving the caller the finger: collaborative responsibility for cellphone interruptions. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1633-1636.

We present a system in which a cell phone decides whether to ring by accepting votes from the others in a conversation with the called party. When a call comes in, the phone first determines who is in the conversation by using a decentralized network of autonomous body-worn sensor nodes. It then vibrates all participants' wireless finger rings. Although the alerted people do not know if it is their own cellphones that are about to interrupt, each of them has the possibility to veto the call anonymously by touching his/her finger ring. If no one vetoes, the phone rings. A user study showed significantly more vetoes during a collaborative group-focused setting than during a less group oriented setting. Our system is a component of a larger research project in context-aware computer-mediated call control.

© All rights reserved Marti and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

 
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Schmandt, Chris and Marti, Stefan (2005): Active Messenger: E-Mail Filtering and Delivery in a Heterogeneous Network. In Human-Computer Interaction, 20 (1) pp. 163-194.

Active Messenger (AM) is a software agent that dynamically filters and routes e-mail to a variety of wired and wireless delivery channels, monitoring a message's progress through various channels over time. Its goal is to ensure that desired messages always reach the subscriber, while decreasing message volume when the user is less reachable through location awareness. AM acts as a proxy, hiding the identity of the multiple device addresses at which the subscriber may be found and caches channels to guarantee seamless information delivery in a heterogeneous network. Our previous experience with mobile messaging influenced the initial requirements and design of AM. We describe the operation and evolution of AM to meet changing user needs, and how our own communication patterns and expectations have changed as we relied increasingly on mobile delivery.

© All rights reserved Schmandt and Marti and/or Taylor and Francis

2004
 
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Ryokai, Kimiko, Marti, Stefan and Ishii, Hiroshi (2004): I/O brush: drawing with everyday objects as ink. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 303-310.

We introduce I/O Brush, a new drawing tool aimed at young children, ages four and up, to explore colors, textures, and movements found in everyday materials by "picking up" and drawing with them. I/O Brush looks like a regular physical paintbrush but has a small video camera with lights and touch sensors embedded inside. Outside of the drawing canvas, the brush can pick up color, texture, and movement of a brushed surface. On the canvas, children can draw with the special "ink" they just picked up from their immediate environment. In our preliminary study with kindergarteners, we found that children not only produced complex works of art using I/O Brush, but they also engaged in explicit talk about patterns and features available in their environment. I/O Brush invites children to explore the transformation from concrete and familiar raw material into abstract concepts about patterns of colors, textures and movements.

© All rights reserved Ryokai et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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User-contributed publications

Here is a list of publications that have been submitted by the author himself/herself or a website visitor:

Marti, S. & Schmandt, C. (2005). Physical Embodiments for Mobile Communication Agents. In Proceedings of UIST 2005, Seattle/WA, 2005.

Marti, S. & Schmandt, C. (2005). Giving the Caller the Finger: Collaborative Responsibility for Cellphone Interruptions. In Proceedings of ACM conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '05), Portland/OR, 2005.

Ryokai, K., Marti, S., & Ishii, H. (2005). Designing "The World as your Palette." Design Expo of the ACM conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '05), Portland/OR, 2005.

Schmandt, C. & Marti, S. (2005). Active Messenger: Email Filtering and Delivery in a Heterogeneous Network. In Human-Computer Interaction Journal (HCI), 2005, Vol. 20, No. 1&2, 2005.

Marti, S. (2004). Autonomous Interactive Intermediaries: Social Intelligence for Mobile Communication Agents. In Doctoral Colloquium Companion Booklet of ACM conference on Computer supported Cooperative Work (CSCW '04), Chicago, 2004.

Ryokai, K., Marti, S., & Ishii, H. (2004). I/O Brush: Drawing with Everyday Objects as Ink. In Proceedings of ACM conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '04), Vienna/Austria, 2004.

Schmandt, C., Marmasse, N., Marti, S., Sawhney, N., & Wheeler, S. (2000). Everywhere Messaging. IBM Systems Journal, Vol. 39, No. 3&4, 2000.

 

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Changes to this page (author)

25 Aug 2009: Added
29 Jun 2007: Modified
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29 Jun 2007: Modified
11 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/stefan_marti.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2005
Pub. count:5
Number of co-authors:3



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Chris Schmandt:3
Hiroshi Ishii:2
Kimiko Ryokai:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Stefan Marti's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Hiroshi Ishii:111
Chris Schmandt:40
Kimiko Ryokai:21
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

Affordances: Designing Intuitive User Interfaces

89% booked. Starts in 6 days
 
 
 

User Experience: The Beginner's Guide

84% booked. Starts in 11 days
 
 
 
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 
 
 
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