Publication statistics

Pub. period:2003-2011
Pub. count:18
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Florian Mueller:7
Frank Vetere:7
Martin R. Gibbs:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Stefan Agamanolis's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Rosalind W. Picard:45
Frank Vetere:42
Cati Vaucelle:24
 
 
 

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Stefan Agamanolis

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Publications by Stefan Agamanolis (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Edge, Darren, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Agamanolis, Stefan, Bongers, Bert and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2011): Designing sports: a framework for exertion games. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2651-2660.

Exertion games require investing physical effort. The fact that such games can support physical health is tempered by our limited understanding of how to design for engaging exertion experiences. This paper introduces the Exertion Framework as a way to think and talk about Exertion Games, both for their formative design and summative analysis. Our Exertion Framework is based on the ways in which we can conceive of the body investing in game-directed exertion, supported by four perspectives on the body (the Responding Body, Moving Body, Sensing Body and Relating Body) and three perspectives on gaming (rules, play and context). The paper illustrates how this framework was derived from prior systems and theory, and presents a case study of how it has been used to inspire novel exertion interactions.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Taylor, Andrea and Agamanolis, Stefan (2010): Service users' views of a mainstream telecare product: the personal trigger. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3259-3264.

Telecare is a term that covers a range of products and services that use new technology to enable people to live with greater independence and safety in their own homes. This paper considers the need for design development of a mainstream telecare product called a personal trigger, which provides a means of summoning assistance when help is needed. It is provided as part of a community alarm service and should be worn at all times for continuous protection. The discussion is based on key findings from a survey of 1,324 service users in North East Scotland with a 60% response rate. Telecare technology is often unattractive because the emphasis is on producing a functional, rather than a desirable product. We argue that the telecare industry needs to consider the social and emotional aspects of design as well as function, even though many of today's service users find the current design acceptable. The survey findings can be incorporated into future product designs.

© All rights reserved Taylor and Agamanolis and/or their publisher

 
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Mueller, Florian, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Edge, Darren, Agamanolis, Stefan and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2010): Jogging over a distance between Europe and Australia. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 189-198.

Exertion activities, such as jogging, require users to invest intense physical effort and are associated with physical and social health benefits. Despite the benefits, our understanding of exertion activities is limited, especially when it comes to social experiences. In order to begin understanding how to design for technologically augmented social exertion experiences, we present "Jogging over a Distance", a system in which spatialized audio based on heart rate allowed runners as far apart as Europe and Australia to run together. Our analysis revealed how certain aspects of the design facilitated a social experience, and consequently we describe a framework for designing augmented exertion activities. We make recommendations as to how designers could use this framework to aid the development of future social systems that aim to utilize the benefits of exertion.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Agamanolis, Stefan, Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): Remote impact: shadowboxing over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3531-3532.

Exertion games -- games that require physical effort from the user -- have been attributed with many social, mental and in particular physical health benefits. However, research has shown that most current implementations support only light or moderate exercise. We are presenting "Remote Impact -- Shadowboxing over a Distance", in which players punch and kick a life-size shadow of a remote participant in order to win the game. The game includes a novel multi-touch large-scale interaction surface that is soft (so no-one gets hurt), but can detect the location as well as the intensity of the players' even most extreme impacts. Remote Impact shows that computer-augmented games can support extreme exertion while supporting novel experiences, such as a reduced risk of injury and supporting distant players, offering a new way of thinking in which areas Human-Computer Interaction research can contribute to our lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Taylor, Andrea, Wilson, Richard and Agamanolis, Stefan (2009): Supporting carers in their caring role through design. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3985-3990.

Carers are people who look after family, partners or friends who could not manage without them because of frailness, illness or disability. Our contribution is to show the potential for design to support carers in their vital caring role, focusing on health information sharing. We describe why it is important to recognise and consider carers in the design of home health monitoring technology, and why it is important to help carers maintain their health and well being. We present design guidelines for home monitoring technology. These guidelines are distilled from a survey distributed to carers in a rural part of Scotland on health information sharing. We used these guidelines to design a new home monitoring system called @Hand. The main difference with current systems is the focus on facilitating information sharing between cared-for and carer rather than cared-for and health professional.

© All rights reserved Taylor et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Agamanolis, Stefan, Vetere, Frank and Gibbs, Martin (2009): Brute force interactions: leveraging intense physical actions in gaming. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 57-64.

People use a wide range of intensity when interacting with computers, spanning from subtle to brute force. However, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions restrained to limited force and do not consider extreme physical and brutal interactions, such as those encountered in contact sports. We present an exploration on the topic of "Brute Force" that aims to support researchers and designers who want to leverage the benefits of such forceful interactions. We present the results of a survey on this topic and describe how the salient themes could be used to inspire design work, in particular in a mediated environment, augmented with computing technology. We describe how the themes inspired certain features, and how technological limitations were overcome during this process. We hope with our work we can encourage designers to expand their range of supported interactions to include these physically intense behaviors we call Brute Force that are exhibited in many activities in people's lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Mueller, Florian, Agamanolis, Stefan, Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2008): Remote impact: shadowboxing over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2291-2296.

People use a wide range of intensity when interacting with artifacts and one another, spanning from subtle to brute force. However, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions restrained to limited force and do not consider extreme physical and brutal interactions, such as those encountered in contact sports. We present an interactive demonstrator that aims to facilitate "Brute Force" activities to aid designers who want to leverage the physical and mental health benefits of such forceful interactions. Our prototype demonstrates that augmenting Brute Force with computing technology can be beneficial: unlike traditional contact sports experiences, it supports distributed participants. Our aim is to encourage designers to extend their supported interactions to include extreme forceful behaviors, which can contribute to general fitness and weight loss while at the same time allowing socializing in an entertaining sportive way.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian and Agamanolis, Stefan (2008): Exertion interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3957-3960.

Exertion as an interface for computing technology has generated increased attention recently due to the belief that it can address health issues such as obesity, contribute to social benefits, and open new markets for entertainment industries. We are proposing a workshop on this topic to bring researchers and industry participants from related areas together to strengthen the scientific influence on this field and promote a multidisciplinary agenda. The workshop will support the development of future collaborative efforts in this rapidly growing area.

© All rights reserved Mueller and Agamanolis and/or ACM Press

 
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Agamanolis, Stefan (2008): At the Intersection of Broadband and Broadcasting: How Interactive TV Technologies can Support Human Connectedness. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 24 (2) pp. 121-135.

Broadcasting is all about creating shared experiences. How can new technologies broaden the effects of broadcasting -- enabling new modes of communication, providing an enhanced sense of community, offering opportunities to meet new people, and allowing us to build relationships in new ways? This article surveys several research projects undertaken in the Human Connectedness group at Media Lab Europe that address these themes.

© All rights reserved Agamanolis and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Mueller, Florian, Gibbs, Martin R., Vetere, Frank and Agamanolis, Stefan (2008): Design space of networked exertion games demonstrated by a three-way physical game based on Table Tennis. In Computers in Entertainment, 6 (3) .

2007
 
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Mueller, Florian, Agamanolis, Stefan, Vetere, Frank and Gibbs, Martin (2007): Brute force as input for networked gaming. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 167-170.

Bodily activities such as sports have many physical and mental health benefits. The associated physical interactions are often of an exertion character and facilitate the use of brute force and intense physical actions. On the other hand, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions that use limited force and often ignored the existence of extreme brutal interactions that can be encountered in everyday life, in particular in contact sports. We present our initial investigations on the concept of "Brute Force" interfaces in HCI and describe work-in-progress on a prototype that aims to facilitate brute force interactions. We hope with our work we can aid designers who want to leverage the physical and mental health benefits of such physically intense behaviors that people do exhibit in their lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Agamanolis, Stefan (2005): New technologies for human connectedness. In Interactions, 12 (4) pp. 33-37.

 
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Kanis, Marije, Winters, Niall, Agamanolis, Stefan, Gavin, Anna and Cullinan, Cian (2005): Toward wearable social networking with iBand. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1521-1524.

The iBand is a wearable bracelet-like device that exchanges information about its users and their relationships. This exchange happens during the common gesture of the handshake, which is detected by the device. As such, iBand seeks to explore potential applications at the intersection of social networking and ubiquitous computing. In this paper, we discuss the iBand technology and feedback from an initial study in which 11 devices were used at two different social networking events. The results suggest that control over personal information is an ongoing issue, but they also highlight the possibility for wearable devices to enable the creation of a set of invented techno-gestures with different affordances and constraints that might be more appropriate for certain social interaction applications.

© All rights reserved Kanis et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian and Agamanolis, Stefan (2005): Sports over a distance. In Computers in Entertainment, 3 (3) p. 4.

2004
 
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Bitton, Joelle, Agamanolis, Stefan and Karau, Matthew (2004): RAW: conveying minimally-mediated impressions of everyday life with an audio-photographic tool. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 495-502.

This paper traces the development of RAW, a system combining a tool and a process for capturing and conveying audiovisual impressions of everyday life. The project aims to enable a relationship between the user of the tool and an audience in a different place or time with an absolute minimum of editorial mediation by a third party. The tool itself incorporates a digital camera and a binaural audio recording device that captures the minute of sound before and after a picture is taken. To inform the design process, we tested prototypes in a progression of three studies within different cultural contexts in Ireland, France, and Mali. We present the results of these experiences, in which we observed among our participants an emerging set of ways of exploiting the tool for different purposes: social glances, depictions of activities, active documentation, and intentional discourses. We also discuss more generally the advantages and pitfalls of multicultural analyses of prototype technologies like the one we undertook.

© All rights reserved Bitton et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kanis, Marije, Winters, Niall, Agamanolis, Stefan, Cullinan, Cian and Gavin, Anna (2004): iBand: a wearable device for handshake-augmented interpersonal information exchange. In: Proceedings of Ubicomp 2004 September 2004, 2004, Nottingham. .

2003
 
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Mueller, Florian, Agamanolis, Stefan and Picard, Rosalind W. (2003): Exertion interfaces: sports over a distance for social bonding and fun. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 561-568.

 
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Kanis, Marije, Agamanolis, Stefan, Vaucelle, Cati and Davenport, Glorianna (2003): The WANDerful Alcove: Encouraging constructive social interaction with a socially transforming interface. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 966.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Jul 2011: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
20 Jul 2009: Modified
20 Jul 2009: Modified
05 Jun 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
09 May 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
06 Mar 2008: Added
06 Mar 2008: Added
24 Jul 2007: Modified
29 Jun 2007: Modified
29 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/stefan_agamanolis.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2003-2011
Pub. count:18
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Florian Mueller:7
Frank Vetere:7
Martin R. Gibbs:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Stefan Agamanolis's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Rosalind W. Picard:45
Frank Vetere:42
Cati Vaucelle:24
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
90% booked. Starts in 5 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
89% booked. Starts in 6 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading