Publication statistics

Pub. period:2008-2012
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:18



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Matt Jones:10
Parisa Eslambolchilar:5
Roderick Murray-Smith:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Simon Robinson's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Stephen A. Brewste..:108
Matt Jones:63
Roderick Murray-Sm..:41
 
 
 

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Simon Robinson

 

Publications by Simon Robinson (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Robinson, Simon, Jones, Matt, Vartiainen, Elina and Marsden, Gary (2012): PicoTales: collaborative authoring of animated stories using handheld projectors. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 671-680. Available online

In this article we describe a novel approach to collaborative video authoring using handheld projectors. PicoTales are created by sketching story elements on a projector+phone prototype, and then animated by moving the projected image. Movements are captured using motion sensor data, rather than visual or other tracking methods, allowing interaction and story creation anywhere. We describe in detail the design and development of our prototype device, and also address issues in position estimation and element tracking. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the prototype, demonstrating its accuracy and usability for ad-hoc creation of story videos. The potential of the system for story authoring is shown via a further experiment looking at the quality of the animated story videos produced. We conclude by considering possible future developments of the concept, and highlighting the benefits of our design for collaborative story capture.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Frohlich, David, Robinson, Simon, Eglinton, Kristen, Jones, Matt and Vartiainen, Elina (2012): Creative cameraphone use in rural developing regions. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 181-190. Available online

In this paper we consider the current and future use of cameraphones in the context of rural South Africa, where many people do not have access to the latest models and ICT infrastructure is poor. We report a new study of cameraphone use in this setting, and the design and testing of a novel application for creating rich multimedia narratives and materials. We argue for better creative media applications on mobile platforms in this region, and greater attention to their local use.

© All rights reserved Frohlich et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Robinson, Simon, Rajput, Nitendra, Jones, Matt, Jain, Anupam, Sahay, Shrey and Nanavati, Amit (2011): TapBack: towards richer mobile interfaces in impoverished contexts. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2733-2736. Available online

Much of the mobile work by HCI researchers explores a future world populated by high-end devices and relatively affluent users. This paper turns to consider the hundreds of millions of people for whom such sophistication will not be realised for many years to come. In developing world contexts, people will continue to rely on voice-primary interactions due to both literacy and economic reasons. Here, we motivate research into how to accommodate advanced mobile interface techniques while overcoming the handset, data-connection and user limitations. As a first step we introduce TapBack: back-of-device taps to control a dialled-up, telephone-network-based voice service. We show how these audio gestures might be recognised over a standard telephone connection, via users' existing low-end devices. Further, in a longitudinal deployment, the techniques were made available on a live voice service used by rural Indian farmers. Data from the study illustrates the desire by users to adopt the approach and its potential extensions.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Robinson, Simon, Jones, Matt, Eslambolchilar, Parisa, Murray-Smith, Roderick and Lindborg, Mads (2010): "I did it my way": moving away from the tyranny of turn-by-turn pedestrian navigation. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 341-344. Available online

In this article we describe a novel approach to pedestrian navigation using bearing-based haptic feedback. People are guided in the general direction of their destination via vibration, but additional exploratory navigation is stimulated by varying feedback based on the potential for taking alternative routes. We describe two mobile prototypes that were created to examine the possible benefits of the approach. The successful use of this exploratory navigation method is demonstrated in a realistic field trial, and we discuss the results and interesting participant behaviours that were recorded.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Williamson, John, Robinson, Simon, Stewart, Craig, Murray-Smith, Roderick, Jones, Matt and Brewster, Stephen A. (2010): Social gravity: a virtual elastic tether for casual, privacy-preserving pedestrian rendezvous. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1485-1494. Available online

We describe a virtual "tether" for mobile devices that allows groups to have quick, simple and privacy-preserving meetups. Our design provides cues which allow dynamic coordination of rendezvous without revealing users' positions. Using accelerometers and magnetometers, combined with GPS positioning and non-visual feedback, users can probe and sense a dynamic virtual object representing the nearest meeting point. The Social Gravity system makes social bonds tangible in a virtual world which is geographically grounded, using haptic feedback to help users rendezvous. We show dynamic navigation using this physical model-based system to be efficient and robust in significant field trials, even in the presence of low-quality positioning. The use of simulators to build models of mobile geolocated systems for pre-validation purposes is discussed, and results compared with those from our trials. Our results show interesting behaviours in the social coordination task, which lead to guidelines for geosocial interaction design. The Social Gravity system proved to be very successful in allowing groups to rendezvous efficiently and simply and can be implemented using only commercially available hardware.

© All rights reserved Williamson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Robinson, Simon (2010): Heads-up engagement with the real world: multimodal techniques for bridging the physical-digital divide. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2895-2898. Available online

The vast and ever-increasing collection of geo-tagged digital content about the physical world around us has prompted the development of interaction methods for various different scenarios. However, the map-based views common on desktop computers are not always appropriate when considering mobile usage. The aim of this research is to provide suitable methods that can encourage user interaction with geo-located digital content, avoiding unnecessary interference with the user's immersion in the physical world around them. This extended abstract outlines the work published to date, suggests future areas of research, and highlights the key contributions brought to the HCI community.

© All rights reserved Robinson and/or his/her publisher

 
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Wilson, Max L., Robinson, Simon, Craggs, Dan, Brimble, Kristian and Jones, Matt (2010): Pico-ing into the future of mobile projector phones. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3997-4002. Available online

Ten years ago we were on the verge of having cameras built into our mobile phones, but knew very little about what to expect or how they would be used. Now we are faced with the same unknowns with mobile projector phones. This research-in-progress seeks to explore how people will want to use such technology, how they will feel when using it, and what social effects we can expect to see. This paper describes our two-phase field investigation, with results and design recommendations from its first, experience-sampling phase.

© All rights reserved Wilson et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2009): Sweep-Shake: finding digital resources in physical environments. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 12. Available online

In this article we describe the Sweep-Shake system, a novel, low interaction cost approach to supporting the spontaneous discovery of geo-located information. By sweeping a mobile device around their environment, users browse for interesting information related to points of interest. We built a mobile haptic prototype which encourages the user to explore their surroundings to search for location information, helping them discover this by providing directional vibrotactile feedback. Once potential targets are selected, the interaction is extended to offer an hierarchy of information levels with a simple method for filtering and selecting desired types of data for each geo-tagged location. We describe and motivate our approach and present a short field trial to situate our design in a real environment, followed by a more detailed user study that compares it against an equivalent visual-based system.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2009): Evaluating haptics for information discovery while walking. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 93-102. Available online

In this article we describe and evaluate a novel, low interaction cost approach to supporting the spontaneous discovery of geo-tagged information while on the move. Our mobile haptic prototype helps users to explore their environment by providing directional vibrotactile feedback based on the presence of location data. We conducted a study to investigate whether users can find these targets while walking, comparing their performance when using only haptic feedback to that when using an equivalent visual system. The results are encouraging, and here we present our findings, discussing their significance and issues relevant to the design of future systems that combine haptics with location awareness.

© All rights reserved Robinson et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2008): Point-to-GeoBlog: Gestures and Sensors to Support User Generated Content Creation. In: Proceedings of the 10th international conference on Human computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2008. pp. 197-206. Available online

 
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Robinson, Simon, Eslambolchilar, Parisa and Jones, Matt (2008): Point-to-GeoBlog: gestures and sensors to support user generated content creation. In: Hofte, G. Henri ter, Mulder, Ingrid and Ruyter, Boris E. R. de (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2008 September 2-5, 2008, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. pp. 197-206. Available online

 
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